11

I am looking for possibilities to define a new type and using it in C# like below:

Class definition:

public class Position
{
    public double180 Longitude { get; set; } // double180 is a type within a range -180 and 180
    public double90 Latitude { get; set; } // double90 is a type within a range of -90 and 90
}

Usage:

var position = new Position
{
     Longitude = 45,
     Latitude = 96 // This line should give an error while initializing the object
};
3
  • 2
    You can make the property validate in its setter, or you can make a type that wraps double with an implicit cast. – SLaks Feb 5 '14 at 17:09
  • The solution provided by @dvnrrs its right, you only need to define what type of Error you need if out of range value is used. – Luis Tellez Feb 5 '14 at 17:13
  • Are you really trying to create a new type or just validating some values? – FrankO Feb 5 '14 at 17:31
8

A type may be overkill, but if you want one, this is a good start:

struct Double180 : IEquatable<Double180>
{
    private readonly double value;

    public Double180(double d)
    {
        if (d < -180 || d > 180)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("d");
        }

        this.value = d;
    }

    public static implicit operator double(Double180 d)
    {
        return d.value;
    }

    public static explicit operator Double180(double d)
    {
        return new Double180(d);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.value.ToString();
    }

    public bool Equals(Double180 other)
    {
        return this.value == other.value;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return obj is Double180 && this.Equals((Double180)obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.value.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Double180 a, Double180 b)
    {
        return a.Equals(b);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Double180 a, Double180 b)
    {
        return !a.Equals(b);
    }
}

Of course, there are many more interfaces to implement, for example IConvertible and IComparable<Double180> would be nice.

As you can see, you know where this starts, but you don't know where it ends.

A setter validator, as suggested by the other answers, might be a better idea.

4
  • If you are going down the template route, why not also template the double part? From what I am seeing the critical information is -180 ..180 and -90 .. 90, and not the data type holding the values. IE a float or int may do as well in some circumstances. – Peter M Feb 7 '14 at 13:42
  • @PeterM This is C#. C++ templates are not available. – Kris Vandermotten Feb 7 '14 at 15:55
  • I've looking at C++ too much recently .. what I meant was make the type a generic class. – Peter M Feb 7 '14 at 16:03
  • @PeterM Generics are too limited for this kind of thing, as you can't use operators. While the struct in my answer doesn't show it, you'd want to implement arithmetic and comparison operators. Also, unlike with C++ templates, generics can't parameterize the range constraint. – Kris Vandermotten Feb 7 '14 at 16:42
11

You don't necessarily need a new type for this. Instead of using an auto property, you can manually write a setter which validates the value:

public double Latitude
{
    get
    {
        return mLatitude;
    }

    set
    {
        if (value > 90 || value < -90)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Invalid latitude");
        }

        mLatitude = value;
    }
}

private double mLatitude;

If you want to reuse this code, you could define your own type and use the above setter in it; then provide an appropriate constructor and conversion operators.

7

You would probably be better adding System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations and using [Range] like so:

public class Position
{
    [Range(-180, 180)]
    public double Longitude { get; set; }

    [Range(-90, 90)]
    public double Latitude { get; set; }
}
4
  • 1
    Isn't system.componentmodel.dataannotations.rangeattribute specific to ASP.NET? – DougM Feb 5 '14 at 19:21
  • 1
    These attributes are advisory only, not strictly enforced by the compiler or CLR. (And as DougM pointed out, domain specific.) – TypeIA Feb 5 '14 at 22:08
  • The attributes can be used in other "domains" like WPF, dynamic controls, etc. – FrankO Feb 5 '14 at 22:46
  • 2
    @FrankO Granted, but this is still only advisory validation, enforced by the caller instead of callee. – TypeIA Feb 6 '14 at 2:21
5

Use a double and have the setter check the value:

private double _longitude;
public double Longitude
{
    get
    {
        return _longitude;
    }
    set
    {
        if(value < -180 || value > 180)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("value");
        }
        _longitude = value;
    }
}
0
4

Add a validation step to the setter:

private double m_Latitude;

public double Latitude
{
  get{return m_Latitude;}

  set
  {
    if(value < -90 || value > 90) throw new ArgumentException("value");

    m_Latitude = value;
  }
}

Note that you as you are providing an implementation of the property you will need to add a member variable to store the underlying property value.

1

I basically got the idea: validation the input inside the setter. When it comes to type definition, it seems Structs are simply the best. So finally, I will use below in my project.

public struct Coordinate
{
    private readonly double _x;
    private readonly double _y;

    /// <summary>
    /// Longitude
    /// </summary>
    public double X
    {
        get { return _x; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Latitude
    /// </summary>
    public double Y
    {
        get { return _y; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initiates a new coordinate.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="x">Longitude [-180, 180]</param>
    /// <param name="y">Latitude [-90, 90]</param>
    public Coordinate(double x, double y)
    {
        if (x < -180 || x > 180)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(
                "x", "Longitude value must be in range of -180 and 180.");

        if (y < -90 || y > 90)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(
                "y", "Latitude value must be in range of -90 and 90.");

        _x = x;
        _y = y;
    }
}

Then I will use like this

var position = new Coordinate(46.32, 34.23);

Thank you all for your valuable comments.

1

I like the documentation to be the part of a system:

public class Position
{
    /// <summary>
    /// ...
    /// 
    /// A value within a range -180 and 180
    /// </summary>
    public double Longitude { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// ...
    /// 
    /// A value within a range -90 and 180
    /// </summary>
    public double Latitude { get; set; }
}

All dependent modules must be tested to comply with the specification of their dependency. Test-driven development is one way. Contract-driven development is another.

If you insist on "defencive programming" with run-time checks of values, then simply use a constructor:

public class Position
{
    /// <summary>
    /// ...
    /// 
    /// A value within a range -180 and 180
    /// </summary>
    public double Longitude { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// ...
    /// 
    /// A value within a range -90 and 180
    /// </summary>
    public double Latitude { get; private set; }

    public Position(double longitude, double latitude)
    {
        if (longitude < -180 || longitude > 180)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        }

        if (latitude < -90 || latitude > 90)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        }

        Longitude = longitude;

        Latitude = latitude;
    }
}

Or use a builder:

public class Position
{
    public double Longitude { get; private set; }

    public double Latitude { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Protects from invalid positions. Use <see cref="Position.Builder"/>
    /// </summary>
    private Position() { }

    /// <summary>
    /// Builds valid positions
    /// </summary>
    public class Builder
    {
        public double Longitude { get; set; }

        public double Latitude { get; set; }

        public Position Build()
        {
            if (Longitude < -180 || Longitude > 180)
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }

            if (Latitude < -90 || Latitude > 90)
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }

            return new Position() { Latitude = this.Latitude, Longitude = this.Longitude };
        }
    }
}

Usage:

Position p = new Position.Builder()
{
    Latitude = 2,
    Longitude = 5
}.Build();

Summary:

  • Run-time checks ("defensive programming"):
    • Public setter with check (see other answers)
    • Public constructor with check
    • "Builder pattern" with builder performing checks
  • Test-time checks:
    • Test-driven
    • Contract-driven

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