5

I'm creating a website but, in order to further my coding skills, I'm trying to do it utilising the power of OOP.

I'm using classes to validate form input so thought I'd have a 'parent' validation class and then child classes for each form that gets submitted (i.e. login class, registration class etc) that would take care of putting the right values into the database etc.

The code I've seen has the parent being constructed from the child's constructor. However, I've not done that but my class seems to work anyway?

Could someone explain to me why we call the parent constructor from the child? Also, is my code only working because I have 'public' functions (methods) in my parent? (is this potentially an issue)?

My code (abridged version for clarity) is below:

class Validation_Class
{
 public function __construct()
{
 // constructor not needed
 }

 public function is_genuine_email_address($email) {
     // code to validate email are genuine here...
     }

 }

My child class looks like...

class Login_Class extends Validation_Class
{

public function __construct()
{
    // I don't call parent::__construct() from here
    // should I be doing?
    // I can still access parent methods with $this->is_genuine_email_address
    }

 }

All my functions (methods) in my Validation_Class are 'public' and when I instantiate my child class I can call any of the Validation Class methods with:

$className = "Login_Class";
$thisClass = new $className();
1
  • OOP, as any other paradigm, is used to solve problems. If you don't see/feel such problems [yet], you won't be using it wisely, but just for the sake of it.
    – moonwave99
    Feb 5, 2014 at 21:42

3 Answers 3

5

It is not nessecary to call the parent constructor

class Parent {
  //maybe just holding some constants
  public $database = 'mydatabase';
}

class Child extends Parent {
   public function myFunction() {
     if ($this->database == 'myDatabase') {
       // you can access the parents data without calling a constructor
     }
  }
}

Is good. But if you want to benefit from something the parent has to do itself in order to work properly, a call to the parent __construct could be needed - like

class Parent {
  public $database = null;
  public function __construct() {
    // example -> login to database
  }
}

class Child extends Parent {
  public function __construct() {
    parent::__construct();
    // .. further code
  }

  public function myFunction() {
     // do something, like executing a query
     $this->database->executeQuery($SQL);
  }
}

In PHP "OOP", which is not real OOP like you see in other languages, constructors are just shorthands for instantiating the resulting object. It would be a hell if we over and over should call

$object = new MyClass();
$object->instantiate()

so calling __construct or new ClassName() is easier. But it is not absolutely needed for the class-successors to work properly, that they call constructors up in the class-hierarchy. Unless, of course, some certain initialization is needed in one of the class parents to let the successors work properly.

2
  • 1
    thank you for your excellent response. Just a really pedantic observation, I'm assuming in your first example that you meant to write - $this->database == 'myDatabase' in the Child class (and not $this->myDatabase) ? Many thanks for your help.
    – John T
    Feb 5, 2014 at 22:28
  • Yes, you are right.Corrected that. Made the example by hand, confused myself with the use of "myxx" Feb 5, 2014 at 22:32
5

From an architecture perspective this would not make much sense. Because using OO inheritance is not just about extending a class in the code but also also designing and structuring your class hierarchy in such a way that it makes sense.

From a logic structuring stamp point I would not imagine a Login class to inherit from a validation class. Rather I might have a validation class object as a member of the Login class and use its functions to perform validations.

From inheritance perspective always remember that we should strive to have classes that represent 'Objects' and not 'Actions'. Of course we can have classes for Login and Validation actions, but actions rarely inherit in a parent-child fashion. They complement each other better an class members.

Calling a parent class, be it constructor or a standard method is not mandatory. It is required if you are having part of an action specified in the parent and more fine-grained action will be defined in the child.

The rule of the thumb is that as you traverse up an inherited class chain it becomes more and more generic and as you traverse down, it becomes more and more specialized.

3
  • many thanks for the information. Especially the tip about having classes represent Objects and not Actions. As I'm very new to OOP I'm just beginning to grasp classes and change my programming viewpoint to make use of them. Information such as is contained in your reply is invaluable in my transition from my 'old' style of programming to getting my head around OOP. Thank you for your help.
    – John T
    Feb 5, 2014 at 22:31
  • You must face it : PHP != OOP Feb 5, 2014 at 22:52
  • @davidkonrad I could face that duel, but I guess I will just let it go ;-) It is like architects who are building houses, arguing about what is the most effective way to park the trucks - very petulant.
    – raidenace
    Mar 18, 2014 at 19:02
0

Rather than using inheritance, using Strategy pattern for validation is one of the popular patterns available. This makes the code more modular and extendible,

Validating Incoming Data with the Strategy Design Pattern

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