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I wrote this to create button like functionality using pygame gaming library to learn how to use Python. In using the function push() I get the error "global name 'next' is not defined" when trying to reference an instance variable.

I don't really understand how variables in classes work, I assume the environment is automatically global due to using the self keyboard: it's global by the fact its a member of self. And then anything else is simply in a local scope. I guess that's wrong. So how do I define a "global name" before its used?

Button:

class Button(object):

    def __init__(self,x,y,dimx,dimy,color,phrase):
        self.is_clicked = False
        self.has_next = False
        self.next = None
        self.x=x
        self.y=y
        self.dim_x=dimx
        self.dim_y=dimy
        self.e_x=x+dimx
        self.e_y=y+dimy
        self.color=color
        self.color2=color
        self.phrase=phrase

    def mypush(self,btn):
        if not (self.has_next):
            self.next=btn
            self.has_next=True
        else:
            next.mypush(btn)   """ === right here === """

    def checkhit(self,x,y):
         if ((x>= self.x) or (x<=self.e_x)):
             if((y>= self.y) or (y<=self.e_y)):
                 self.is_clicked = True
             self.color = (255,255,255)
                 return self.phrase
         elif (self.has_next == True):
             return self.next.checkhit(x,y)
         else:
             return None

    def release(self):
        if(self.is_clicked == True):
             self.is_clicked=False
         self.color=self.color2
        elif(self.has_next == True):
            self.next.release()

    def mydraw(self,the_game,scrn):
        the_game.draw.rect(scrn,self.color,[self.x, self.y, self.dim_x,self.dim_y])
        if(self.has_next):
            self.next.mydraw(the_game,scrn)
    ...

Where function push is used:

for x in range(2, 10):
    btn = Button(10+50*x,470,45,20,(128,64,224),"Button ".join(num[x-1]))
    my_button.mypush(btn)

result:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "testbutton1.py", line 83, in <module>
    my_button.mypush(btn)
  File "testbutton1.py", line 22, in mypush
    next.mypush(btn)
NameError: global name 'next' is not defined
  • By convention in Python, class names use CamelCase, so Button. Variables use lower_case, so my_button. Makes things a little more readable; I edited your code. – smci Jan 26 '18 at 0:35
  • Note that self is not a keyword. It's just another local variable, set from the function parameter. You can name that parameter anything you like, that it's called self is just convention. Don't get wrong, you really want to stick to the convention because that makes it immediately clear what the name refers to, but it's not a magic name by any manner of means. – Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '18 at 12:29
2

you need to refer to the member variable

self.next.mypush(btn)

not the global variable

next
  • 1
    Also.. check out PEP8 python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 you might as well get into "pythonic" habits from the start – demented hedgehog Feb 6 '14 at 5:34
  • That's a bit of a terse answer I gave there. Let me expand on it a bit. Variables are resolved in python like this. Namespaces are dictionaries. A class instance has a namespace which you can access through self, e.g. self.next. The class itself has (static) class scoped variables which you access through classname. Then you access variables in the global namespace. Go and have a look at the python builtins globals() and locals() and try adding print(globals()) and print(locals()) to a few places in your code to see how it works. – demented hedgehog Oct 9 '15 at 8:21

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