7

I have a main window called form1. in form1 I have a button, when it is pressed it will open form2 (form2.ShowDialog()). In form2 I have a button called "Check". When the user clicks on "Check" it should do some validation and if successful creates a string object and return it to form1. Any Ideas on how to implement this? I don't want to return anything when the user closes the window.

10

Create an event in your second window, have the parameters of the event's delegate contain whatever information you want to pass:

public class Popup : Window
{
    public event Action<string> Check;

    public void Foo()
    {
        //fire the event
        if (Check != null)
            Check("hello world");
    }
}

Then the main window can subscribe to that event to do what it wants with the information:

public class Main : Window
{
    private Label label;
    public void Foo()
    {
        Popup popup = new Popup();
        popup.Check += value => label.Content = value;
        popup.ShowDialog();
    }
}
  • Beat me to it. Personally, I love this method of inter-window communication. There is, however, another method that I also quite like, and I'll post an answer containing that below. – Joe Brunscheon Feb 6 '14 at 16:10
  • Worked flawlessly. Thank you! – barack o mama Feb 6 '14 at 16:25
  • what if i have two strings?? How to write code?? popup.Check += value => label.Content = value, label2.Content = value; ?? – Sizzling Code Aug 7 '15 at 11:59
  • @SizzlingCode Then you use a statement lambda rather than an expression lambda, or you just assign the result of one assignment to the next label.. – Servy Aug 7 '15 at 12:40
  • 1
    Thankyou SIr. but if its ok can you give example, as i am really new to C# and WPF application. Moved from PHP development. i already have posted a question regarding this.. stackoverflow.com/questions/31877458/… If its ok please have a look to my question. – Sizzling Code Aug 7 '15 at 12:43
2

This answer while not perfectly on target will be more useful to people that google themselves here for the general solution of how to communicate between windows:

There is no reason at all to set up events to access objects of the Main Window of you application. You can simply call them on the popup code and be done with it:

((MainWindow)Application.Current.MainWindow).textBox1.Text = "Some text";
0

This could be accomplished in several ways. The method Servy posted is quite good and will accomplish what you need. I would prefer to see the Action<sting> passed as a parameter to the constructor and named callback so it's clear what it is used for, but that's just a preference thing.

The other method that is pretty good at getting this done is via Messaging. The MVVMLight Toolkit provides a great little feature in it for accomplishing tasks such as this.

Step 1: create a strongly typed Message:

public class MyMessage : MessageBase
{
    //Message payload implementation goes here by declaring properties, etc...
}

Step 2: Determine where, and when to publish that message.

public class PublishMessage
{
    public PublishMessage(){
    }

    public void MyMethod()
    {
        //do something in this method, then send message:
        Messenger.Default.Send(new MyMessage() { /*initialize payload here */ });
    }
}

Setp 3: Now that you are sending the message, you need to be able to receive that message:

public class MessageReceiver
{
    public MessageReceiver()
    {
        Messenger.Default.Register<MyMessage>(this, message => Foo(message));
    }

    public void Foo(MyMessage message)
    {
        //do stuff
    }
}
  • 1
    While you haven't provided enough of an implementation to say for sure, it appears that what you have here is, more or less, a public static event that can be fired by anyone. It is no longer discoverable for other types to see what events there might be to subscribe to, when they do come across a message there isn't any built in indication as to what it means, who's "responsible" for it, what it is associated with, etc. It is also possible to (and rather easy to mistakenly) end up firing the improper message, causing problems in two different places. I don't really see any advantages here. – Servy Feb 6 '14 at 16:30
  • I didn't say it was an advantage. Just another way of doing it. It's actually pretty easy to find out who is subscribed to what Message in this scenario by finding your message, and inspecting who uses it. It's strongly typed, so there's no question about what messages you are sending and receiving. The responsibility falls to the Message Receiver about what to do with the message. The sender is simply raising a flag to say that something has been done. Sending improper messages is pretty hard to do, but possible, and just requires developers to pay attention. – Joe Brunscheon Feb 6 '14 at 16:34

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