44

I have noticed a odd behavior in using letter-spacing and text-align: center together. Increasing the space, bring the text to be closer to the left margin of the element.

div {
  width: 400px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: #3b0d3b;
  text-align: center;
  margin: auto;
}

p {
  color: #fff;
  margin-top: 40px;
  text-align: center;
  padding-top: 10px;
  font-size: 1.2em;
}

.spacing {
  letter-spacing:.4em; /* This property is the problem */
}

.spacing-large {
  letter-spacing:.9em; /* This property is the problem */
}
<div>
  <p>- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
  <p class="spacing">- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
  <p class="spacing-large">- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
</div>

I spot the same behavior on last Firefox and Chrome. Is there a way to fix this issue?

4
  • I don't get it..where is the problem?
    – Naele
    Feb 6, 2014 at 19:27
  • the text is not centered. the left dash is closer to the left margin than the right dash to the right margin.
    – pasine
    Feb 6, 2014 at 19:28
  • @Naele the text are not centered
    – Huangism
    Feb 6, 2014 at 19:28
  • If you look closely, the top one is not centered as well... so it looks like a bug to me. At least it is consistent across browsers. Feb 6, 2014 at 19:30

8 Answers 8

109

It seems you need to indent the text by the same amount as the letter-spacing. The first letter does not have the spacing applied to the left side

div {
  width: 400px;
  height: 400px;
  background-color: #3b0d3b;
  text-align: center;
  margin: auto;
}

p {
  color: #fff;
  background: black;
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 1.2em;
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}

.spacing {
  letter-spacing: .4em;
}

.spacing-large {
  letter-spacing: 0.9em;
  text-align: center;
  text-indent: 0.9em;
}
<div>
  <p>- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
  <p class="spacing">- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
  <p class="spacing-large">- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
</div>

The logical explanation I came up with is - since it is the first letter, spacing on the left side will not apply.

4
  • I guess it is because it is easier to align paragraphs with different letter spacing?
    – cytsunny
    Mar 17, 2017 at 4:02
  • It appears to me that the spacing adjustment is made to the right of the character only. So if you increase letter spacing it doesn't append space to the left side of the character at the same time as the right. Was trying to see if you could apply flexbox to characters in a word, alas I have not found a way.
    – Peter W
    Dec 23, 2017 at 20:25
  • 1
    This is fine when you are consistently using text-align: center on the text, but a text indent will cause issues if some text is also left aligned Jun 7, 2018 at 20:11
  • Thanks! It doesn't work with multiline text though. Margin-left with the same value helps in this case.
    – ZenBerry
    Apr 12, 2023 at 9:50
9

Using padding would be safer incase the text goes onto two lines. text-indent would only indent the first line of text.

p { 
  padding-left: 0.9em; 
}
1
  • 4
    This is an under-appreciated contribution, much better solution in my opinion/case Oct 15, 2019 at 8:26
2

Set a negative margin the same amount as the letter spacing. So if your letter spacing is 10px, set margin-right:-10px.

Using text-indent will leave that space in front of the first letter, even when the parent element is too small to fit the content, causing it to not look centered.

1

If you look closely, the top one without letter spacing is not properly centered as well. The only thing I can think of is to monkey patch it with margin-left: 15px like so:

p { margin-left: 15px; }
1

letter-spacing is inherently imbalanced, coming after each letter. You can compensate for it with a negative margin-right.

For example, in React with TypeScript and styled-components:

import React from 'react'
import styled from 'styled-components'

/**
 * Center text, accounting for letter-spacing.
 */
export const CenterText: React.FC<{
  className?: string
  letterSpacing: string
}> = ({ children, className, letterSpacing }) => {
  return <Body {...{ className, letterSpacing }}>{children}</Body>
}

/**
 * Negative right margin handles inherent imbalance in letter-spacing.
 * `justify-content: center` handles both narrow content and overflow.
 * `text-align: center` aligns multiple lines of text when text wraps.
 */
export const Body = styled.div<{ letterSpacing: string }>`
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  letter-spacing: ${o => o.letterSpacing};
  margin-right: -${o => o.letterSpacing};
  text-align: center;
`
0

This behavior is because there is the extra space (as a result of increased letter spacing) added to the right side of the right most letter.

There is a simpler method to achieve center alignment in such cases. Just remove the letter spacing property from the last alphabet

Here is a solution.

div {
  width: 400px;
  height:400px;
  background-color: #3b0d3b;
  text-align:center;
  margin:auto;
}

p {
  color:#fff;
  margin-top: 40px;
  text-align:center;
  padding-top:30px;
  font-size: 1.2em;
}

.spacing {
  letter-spacing:.4em;
}

.spacing-large {
  letter-spacing:.9em;
}
<div>
  <p>- Foo Bar Zan -</p>
  <p class="spacing">- Foo Bar Zan <span style="letter-spacing:0">-</span></p>
  <p class="spacing-large">- Foo Bar Zan <span style="letter-spacing:0">-</span></p>
</div>

Notice the span element nesting the last character.

0
0

The best answer I have found to solve a letter spacing word being off center is to simply put &nbsp; in front of the word.

1
  • This doesn't work because you introduce both a space and letter spacing to the left of the text, which is larger than just the letter spacing on the right of the text. So now your 'centered' text is too far to the right.
    – Bryan
    Dec 29, 2020 at 10:55
0

It probably depends on your use-case but using flexbox and a CSS ::before selector might be a viable solution if you still want to allow padding on the parent container without affecting the content.

.tracking-center {
  letter-spacing: 0.25em;
  display: flex;
  justify-content:center;
  text-align:center;
}

.tracking-center.inline-flex {
  display: inline-flex;
}

.tracking-center::before {
  width: 0.25em;
  content: '';
  flex: none;
}
<h3>Example</h3>
<div style="width:80px">
  <p class="tracking-center">
   Hello
  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center">
   The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
  </p>
</div>

<h3>Example: Inline container with its own padding</h3>
<div style="width:200px">
  <p class="tracking-center inline-flex" style="padding:0 2em;">
   Hello
  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center inline-flex" style="padding:0 2em;">
   The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
  </p>
</div>

<h3>Example: Container too narrow</h3>
<div style="width:20px; margin-left: 50px;">
  <p class="tracking-center">
   Hello
  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center">
   The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
  </p>
</div>

<style>
<!-- example styles -->
div {
  border:2px cyan dotted;
}

p {
 border:2px pink dotted;
 display: inline-block;
}
.tracking-center::before {
  background:turquoise;
}
</style>

If you want to add a wrapper-container inside your element every time, you can simply specify a margin/padding on the inner-container like others have suggested

 .tracking-center > * {
   letter-spacing: 0.25em;
   margin-left: 0.25em; //or negative margin-right;
   text-align: center;
   display: block;
 }
<h3>Example</h3>
<div style="width:80px">
  <p class="tracking-center">
    <span>
     Hello
   </span>
  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center">
   <span>
     The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
   </span>
  </p>
</div>

<h3>Example: Inline container with its own padding</h3>
<div style="width:200px">
  <p class="tracking-center inline-flex" style="padding:0 2em;">
    <span>
     Hello
   </span>

  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center inline-flex" style="padding:0 2em;">
   <span>
     The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
   </span>
  </p>
</div>

<h3>Example: Container too narrow</h3>
<div style="width:20px; margin-left: 50px;">
  <p class="tracking-center">
    <span>
     Hello
   </span>
  </p>
  <p class="tracking-center">
   <span>
     The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
   </span>
  </p>
</div>

<style>
<!-- example styles -->
div {
  border:2px cyan dotted;
}

p {
 border:2px pink dotted;
 display: inline-block;
}
p > span {
  background:white;
}
p {
  background:turquoise;
}
</style>

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