29

How is it possible to learn the name of function I am in?

The below code alerts 'Object'. But I need to know how to alert "Outer."

function Outer(){

    alert(typeof this);

}
| |
22

I think that you can do that :

var name = arguments.callee.toString();

For more information on this, take a look at this article.

function callTaker(a,b,c,d,e){
  // arguments properties
  console.log(arguments);
  console.log(arguments.length);
  console.log(arguments.callee);
  console.log(arguments[1]);
  // Function properties
 console.log(callTaker.length);
  console.log(callTaker.caller);
  console.log(arguments.callee.caller);
  console.log(arguments.callee.caller.caller);
  console.log(callTaker.name);
  console.log(callTaker.constructor);
}

function callMaker(){
  callTaker("foo","bar",this,document);
}

function init(){
  callMaker();
}
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  • 3
    unfortunately arguments.callee is deprecated, but since ECMA hasn't defined any substitute yet, this is the way to go. – Boldewyn Jan 29 '10 at 11:01
  • @boldewyn: after more searching I saw that too. But while it's deprecated it still works in most browsers. And like you said, there's no alternative sooooo... ^^ – marcgg Jan 29 '10 at 11:05
  • 1
    @Boldewyn, arguments.callee is not just deprecated. When strict mode is enabled, accessing it would cause TypeError. – bryantsai Jan 29 '10 at 11:18
  • 4
    I'm not sure arguments.callee is deprecated. Function.arguments and Function.arguments.callee are, but not the callee property of the arguments of a function. From MDC:- JavaScript 1.4: Deprecated callee as a property of Function.arguments, retained it as a property of a function's local arguments variable. – meouw Jan 29 '10 at 11:32
  • This is the source @meouw is quoting from. – Nils Lindemann Oct 20 '19 at 15:19
30

This will work:

function test() {
  var z = arguments.callee.name;
  console.log(z);
}
| |
7

As of ES6, you can use Function.prototype.name. This has the added benefit of working with arrow functions, since they do not have their own arguments object.

function logFuncName() {
  console.log(logFuncName.name);
}

const logFuncName2 = () => {
  console.log(logFuncName2.name);
};
| |
  • 9
    What about not wanting to use the function's own name? Something like "this.name" where "this" means "this function" rather than "this class"? – Ran Lottem Dec 2 '18 at 8:47

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