6

I have the cameraMatrix and the distCoeff needed to undistort an image or a vector of points. Now I'd like to distort them back.

Is it possible with Opencv? I remember I read something about it in stackoverflow but cannot find now.

EDIT: I found the way to do it in this answer. It is also in the opencv developer zone (in this issue)

But my results are not properly correct. There is some error of 2-4 pixel more or less. Probably there is something wrong in my code because in the answer I linked everything seems good in the unit test. Maybe type casting from float to double, or something else that I cannot see.

here is my test case:

#include <opencv2/core/core.hpp>
#include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp>

#include <iostream>

using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

void distortPoints(const std::vector<cv::Point2d> & src, std::vector<cv::Point2d> & dst,
                         const cv::Mat & cameraMatrix, const cv::Mat & distorsionMatrix)
{

  dst.clear();
  double fx = cameraMatrix.at<double>(0,0);
  double fy = cameraMatrix.at<double>(1,1);
  double ux = cameraMatrix.at<double>(0,2);
  double uy = cameraMatrix.at<double>(1,2);

  double k1 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 0);
  double k2 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 1);
  double p1 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 2);
  double p2 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 3);
  double k3 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 4);

  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < src.size(); i++)
  {
    const cv::Point2d & p = src[i];
    double x = p.x;
    double y = p.y;
    double xCorrected, yCorrected;
    //Step 1 : correct distorsion
    {
      double r2 = x*x + y*y;
      //radial distorsion
      xCorrected = x * (1. + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2);
      yCorrected = y * (1. + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2);

      //tangential distorsion
      //The "Learning OpenCV" book is wrong here !!!
      //False equations from the "Learning OpenCv" book below :
      //xCorrected = xCorrected + (2. * p1 * y + p2 * (r2 + 2. * x * x));
      //yCorrected = yCorrected + (p1 * (r2 + 2. * y * y) + 2. * p2 * x);
      //Correct formulae found at : http://www.vision.caltech.edu/bouguetj/calib_doc/htmls/parameters.html
      xCorrected = xCorrected + (2. * p1 * x * y + p2 * (r2 + 2. * x * x));
      yCorrected = yCorrected + (p1 * (r2 + 2. * y * y) + 2. * p2 * x * y);
    }
    //Step 2 : ideal coordinates => actual coordinates
    {
      xCorrected = xCorrected * fx + ux;
      yCorrected = yCorrected * fy + uy;
    }
    dst.push_back(cv::Point2d(xCorrected, yCorrected));
  }

}

int main(int /*argc*/, char** /*argv*/) {

    cout << "OpenCV version: " << CV_MAJOR_VERSION << " " << CV_MINOR_VERSION << endl; // 2 4

    Mat cameraMatrix = (Mat_<double>(3,3) << 1600, 0, 789, 0, 1600, 650, 0, 0, 1);
    Mat distorsion   = (Mat_<double>(5,1) << -0.48, 0, 0, 0, 0);

    cout << "camera matrix: " << cameraMatrix << endl;
    cout << "distorsion coefficent: " << distorsion << endl;

    // the starting points
    std::vector<Point2f> original_pts;
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(23, 358) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(8,  357) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(12, 342) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(27, 343) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(7,  350) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(-8, 349) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(-4, 333) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(12, 334) );
    Mat original_m = Mat(original_pts);

    // undistort
    Mat undistorted_m;
    undistortPoints(original_m, undistorted_m, 
                    cameraMatrix, distorsion);

    cout << "undistort points" << undistorted_m << endl;

    // back to array
    vector< cv::Point2d > undistorted_points;
    for(int i=0; i<original_pts.size(); ++i) {
        Point2d p;
        p.x = undistorted_m.at<float>(i, 0);
        p.y = undistorted_m.at<float>(i, 1);
        undistorted_points.push_back( p );

        // NOTE THAT HERE THERE IS AN APPROXIMATION
        // WHAT IS IT? STD::COUT? CASTING TO FLOAT?
        cout << undistorted_points[i] << endl;
    }

    vector< cv::Point2d > redistorted_points;
    distortPoints(undistorted_points, redistorted_points, cameraMatrix, distorsion);

    cout << redistorted_points << endl;

    for(int i=0; i<original_pts.size(); ++i) {
        cout << original_pts[i] << endl;
        cout << redistorted_points[i] << endl;

        Point2d o;
        o.x = original_pts[i].x;
        o.y = original_pts[i].y;
        Point2d dist = redistorted_points[i] - o;

        double norm = sqrt(dist.dot(dist));
        std::cout << "distance = " << norm << std::endl;

        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

And here is my output:

    OpenCV version: 2 4
camera matrix: [1600, 0, 789;
  0, 1600, 650;
  0, 0, 1]
distorsion coefficent: [-0.48; 0; 0; 0; 0]
undistort points[-0.59175861, -0.22557901; -0.61276215, -0.22988389; -0.61078846, -0.24211435; -0.58972651, -0.23759322; -0.61597037, -0.23630577; -0.63910204, -0.24136727; -0.63765121, -0.25489968; -0.61291695, -0.24926868]
[-0.591759, -0.225579]
[-0.612762, -0.229884]
[-0.610788, -0.242114]
[-0.589727, -0.237593]
[-0.61597, -0.236306]
[-0.639102, -0.241367]
[-0.637651, -0.2549]
[-0.612917, -0.249269]
[24.45809095301274, 358.5558144841519; 10.15042938413364, 357.806737955385; 14.23419751024494, 342.8856229036298; 28.51642501095819, 343.610956960508; 9.353743900129871, 350.9029663678638; -4.488033489615646, 350.326357275197; -0.3050714463695385, 334.477016554487; 14.41516474594289, 334.9822130217053]
[23, 358]
[24.4581, 358.556]
distance = 1.56044

[8, 357]
[10.1504, 357.807]
distance = 2.29677

[12, 342]
[14.2342, 342.886]
distance = 2.40332

[27, 343]
[28.5164, 343.611]
distance = 1.63487

[7, 350]
[9.35374, 350.903]
distance = 2.521

[-8, 349]
[-4.48803, 350.326]
distance = 3.75408

[-4, 333]
[-0.305071, 334.477]
distance = 3.97921

[12, 334]
[14.4152, 334.982]
distance = 2.60725
8

The initUndistortRectifyMap linked in one of the answers of the question you mention does indeed what you want. Since it is used in Remap to build the full undistorted image, it gives, for each location in the destination image (undistorted), where to find the corresponding pixel in the distorted image so they can use its color. So it's really an f(undistorted) = distorted map.

However, using this map will only allow for input positions that are integer and within the image rectangle. Thankfully, the documentation gives the full equations.

It is mostly what you have, except that there is a preliminary step that you are missing. Here is my version (it is C# but should be the same):

public PointF Distort(PointF point)
{
    // To relative coordinates <- this is the step you are missing.
    double x = (point.X - cx) / fx;
    double y = (point.Y - cy) / fy;

    double r2 = x*x + y*y;

    // Radial distorsion
    double xDistort = x * (1 + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2 * r2);
    double yDistort = y * (1 + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2 * r2);

    // Tangential distorsion
    xDistort = xDistort + (2 * p1 * x * y + p2 * (r2 + 2 * x * x));
    yDistort = yDistort + (p1 * (r2 + 2 * y * y) + 2 * p2 * x * y);

    // Back to absolute coordinates.
    xDistort = xDistort * fx + cx;
    yDistort = yDistort * fy + cy;

    return new PointF((float)xDistort, (float)yDistort);
}
  • I think this solution would undistort the points and not distort them back like OP asked. I am in a similar situation as OP, and multiplying the coefficients by -1 gives me the expected result. – François Pilote Feb 9 '17 at 15:07
  • 1
    @FrançoisPilote: are your coeffs coming from OpenCV? There are other distortion models that use the inverse mapping and produce coefficients that go the other way. I have used the above with success in my own programs. – Joan Charmant Feb 10 '17 at 1:30
  • yes, the coefficients i am using come from opencv, most precisely from calibrateCamera function. – François Pilote Feb 17 '17 at 19:58
  • would this be similar for point clouds? because i have un-distorted point cloud, distortion coefficients and i'd like to apply them – mereth Oct 11 '19 at 7:27
3

You can easily distort back your points using ProjectPoints.

cv::Mat rVec(3, 1, cv::DataType<double>::type); // Rotation vector
rVec.at<double>(0) = 0;
rVec.at<double>(1) = 0;
rVec.at<double>(2) =0;
cv::Mat tVec(3, 1, cv::DataType<double>::type); // Translation vector
tVec.at<double>(0) =0;
tVec.at<double>(1) = 0;
tVec.at<double>(2) = 0;

cv::projectPoints(points,rVec,tVec, cameraMatrix, distCoeffs,result);

PS: in the opencv 3 they added a function for distort.

  • 1
    That distort function is for fish eye camera model, not pinhole camera model which cv::undistortPoints uses. – user202729 Jul 6 '19 at 2:49
2

If you multiply all the distortion coefficients by -1 you can then pass them to undistort or undistortPoints and basically you will apply the inverse distortion which will bring the distortion back.

  • That's only a first order approximation though, it only works well for small distortions. – Hugo Maxwell Apr 4 '18 at 17:29
1

The OCV camera model (see http://docs.opencv.org/2.4/modules/calib3d/doc/camera_calibration_and_3d_reconstruction.html) describes how a 3D point first maps to an immaginary ideal pinhole camera coordinate and then "distorts" the coordinate so that it models the image of the actual real world camera.

Using the OpenCV distortion coefficients (= Brown distortion coefficients), the following 2 operations are simple to calculate:

  • Calculate the pixel-coordinate in the original camera image from a given pixel-coordinate in the distortion-free (i.e. undistorted image). AFAIK there is no explicit OpenCV function for this. But the code in Joan Charmant's answer does exactly this.
  • Calculate the distortion-free image from the original camera image. This can be done using cv::undistort(....) or alternatively a combination of cv::initUndistortRectifyMap(....) and cv::remap(....).

However the following 2 operations are computionally much more complex:

  • Calculate the pixel coordinate in the distortion-free image from a pixel coordinate in the original camera image. This can be done using cv::undistortPoints(....).
  • Calculate the original camera image from the distortion-free image.

This may sound counter intuitive. More detailed explanation:

For a given a pixel coordinate in the distortion-free image it is easy to calculate the corresponding coordinate in the original image (i.e. "distort" the coordinate).

x = (u - cx) / fx; // u and v are distortion free
y = (v - cy) / fy;

rr = x*x + y*y
distortion = 1 + rr  * (k1 + rr * (k2 + rr * k3))
# I ommit the tangential parameters for clarity

u_ = fx * distortion * x + cx
v_ = fy * distortion * y + cy
// u_ and v_ are coordinates in the original camera image

Doing it the other way round is much more difficult; basically one would need to combine all the code lines above into one big vectorial equation and solve it for u and v. I think for the general case where all 5 distortion coefficients are used, it can only be done numerically. Which is (without looking at the code) probably what cv::undistortPoints(....) does.

However, using the distortion coefficients, we can calculate an undistortion-map (cv::initUndistortRectifyMap(....)) which maps from the distortion-free image coordinates to the original camera image coordinates. Each entry in the undistortion-map contains a (floating point) pixel position in the original camera image. In other words, the undistortion-map points from the distorion-free image into the original camera image. So the map is calculated by exactly the above formula.

The map can then be applied to get the new distortion-free image from the original (cv::remap(....)). cv::undistort() does this without the explicit calculation of the undistorion map.

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