9

I have the cameraMatrix and the distCoeff needed to undistort an image or a vector of points. Now I'd like to distort them back.

Is it possible with Opencv? I remember I read something about it in stackoverflow but cannot find now.

EDIT: I found the way to do it in this answer. It is also in the opencv developer zone (in this issue)

But my results are not properly correct. There is some error of 2-4 pixel more or less. Probably there is something wrong in my code because in the answer I linked everything seems good in the unit test. Maybe type casting from float to double, or something else that I cannot see.

here is my test case:

#include <opencv2/core/core.hpp>
#include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp>

#include <iostream>

using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

void distortPoints(const std::vector<cv::Point2d> & src, std::vector<cv::Point2d> & dst,
                         const cv::Mat & cameraMatrix, const cv::Mat & distorsionMatrix)
{

  dst.clear();
  double fx = cameraMatrix.at<double>(0,0);
  double fy = cameraMatrix.at<double>(1,1);
  double ux = cameraMatrix.at<double>(0,2);
  double uy = cameraMatrix.at<double>(1,2);

  double k1 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 0);
  double k2 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 1);
  double p1 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 2);
  double p2 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 3);
  double k3 = distorsionMatrix.at<double>(0, 4);

  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < src.size(); i++)
  {
    const cv::Point2d & p = src[i];
    double x = p.x;
    double y = p.y;
    double xCorrected, yCorrected;
    //Step 1 : correct distorsion
    {
      double r2 = x*x + y*y;
      //radial distorsion
      xCorrected = x * (1. + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2);
      yCorrected = y * (1. + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2);

      //tangential distorsion
      //The "Learning OpenCV" book is wrong here !!!
      //False equations from the "Learning OpenCv" book below :
      //xCorrected = xCorrected + (2. * p1 * y + p2 * (r2 + 2. * x * x));
      //yCorrected = yCorrected + (p1 * (r2 + 2. * y * y) + 2. * p2 * x);
      //Correct formulae found at : http://www.vision.caltech.edu/bouguetj/calib_doc/htmls/parameters.html
      xCorrected = xCorrected + (2. * p1 * x * y + p2 * (r2 + 2. * x * x));
      yCorrected = yCorrected + (p1 * (r2 + 2. * y * y) + 2. * p2 * x * y);
    }
    //Step 2 : ideal coordinates => actual coordinates
    {
      xCorrected = xCorrected * fx + ux;
      yCorrected = yCorrected * fy + uy;
    }
    dst.push_back(cv::Point2d(xCorrected, yCorrected));
  }

}

int main(int /*argc*/, char** /*argv*/) {

    cout << "OpenCV version: " << CV_MAJOR_VERSION << " " << CV_MINOR_VERSION << endl; // 2 4

    Mat cameraMatrix = (Mat_<double>(3,3) << 1600, 0, 789, 0, 1600, 650, 0, 0, 1);
    Mat distorsion   = (Mat_<double>(5,1) << -0.48, 0, 0, 0, 0);

    cout << "camera matrix: " << cameraMatrix << endl;
    cout << "distorsion coefficent: " << distorsion << endl;

    // the starting points
    std::vector<Point2f> original_pts;
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(23, 358) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(8,  357) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(12, 342) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(27, 343) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(7,  350) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(-8, 349) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(-4, 333) );
    original_pts.push_back( Point2f(12, 334) );
    Mat original_m = Mat(original_pts);

    // undistort
    Mat undistorted_m;
    undistortPoints(original_m, undistorted_m, 
                    cameraMatrix, distorsion);

    cout << "undistort points" << undistorted_m << endl;

    // back to array
    vector< cv::Point2d > undistorted_points;
    for(int i=0; i<original_pts.size(); ++i) {
        Point2d p;
        p.x = undistorted_m.at<float>(i, 0);
        p.y = undistorted_m.at<float>(i, 1);
        undistorted_points.push_back( p );

        // NOTE THAT HERE THERE IS AN APPROXIMATION
        // WHAT IS IT? STD::COUT? CASTING TO FLOAT?
        cout << undistorted_points[i] << endl;
    }

    vector< cv::Point2d > redistorted_points;
    distortPoints(undistorted_points, redistorted_points, cameraMatrix, distorsion);

    cout << redistorted_points << endl;

    for(int i=0; i<original_pts.size(); ++i) {
        cout << original_pts[i] << endl;
        cout << redistorted_points[i] << endl;

        Point2d o;
        o.x = original_pts[i].x;
        o.y = original_pts[i].y;
        Point2d dist = redistorted_points[i] - o;

        double norm = sqrt(dist.dot(dist));
        std::cout << "distance = " << norm << std::endl;

        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

And here is my output:

    OpenCV version: 2 4
camera matrix: [1600, 0, 789;
  0, 1600, 650;
  0, 0, 1]
distorsion coefficent: [-0.48; 0; 0; 0; 0]
undistort points[-0.59175861, -0.22557901; -0.61276215, -0.22988389; -0.61078846, -0.24211435; -0.58972651, -0.23759322; -0.61597037, -0.23630577; -0.63910204, -0.24136727; -0.63765121, -0.25489968; -0.61291695, -0.24926868]
[-0.591759, -0.225579]
[-0.612762, -0.229884]
[-0.610788, -0.242114]
[-0.589727, -0.237593]
[-0.61597, -0.236306]
[-0.639102, -0.241367]
[-0.637651, -0.2549]
[-0.612917, -0.249269]
[24.45809095301274, 358.5558144841519; 10.15042938413364, 357.806737955385; 14.23419751024494, 342.8856229036298; 28.51642501095819, 343.610956960508; 9.353743900129871, 350.9029663678638; -4.488033489615646, 350.326357275197; -0.3050714463695385, 334.477016554487; 14.41516474594289, 334.9822130217053]
[23, 358]
[24.4581, 358.556]
distance = 1.56044

[8, 357]
[10.1504, 357.807]
distance = 2.29677

[12, 342]
[14.2342, 342.886]
distance = 2.40332

[27, 343]
[28.5164, 343.611]
distance = 1.63487

[7, 350]
[9.35374, 350.903]
distance = 2.521

[-8, 349]
[-4.48803, 350.326]
distance = 3.75408

[-4, 333]
[-0.305071, 334.477]
distance = 3.97921

[12, 334]
[14.4152, 334.982]
distance = 2.60725
13

The initUndistortRectifyMap linked in one of the answers of the question you mention does indeed what you want. Since it is used in Remap to build the full undistorted image, it gives, for each location in the destination image (undistorted), where to find the corresponding pixel in the distorted image so they can use its color. So it's really an f(undistorted) = distorted map.

However, using this map will only allow for input positions that are integer and within the image rectangle. Thankfully, the documentation gives the full equations.

It is mostly what you have, except that there is a preliminary step that you are missing. Here is my version (it is C# but should be the same):

public PointF Distort(PointF point)
{
    // To relative coordinates <- this is the step you are missing.
    double x = (point.X - cx) / fx;
    double y = (point.Y - cy) / fy;

    double r2 = x*x + y*y;

    // Radial distorsion
    double xDistort = x * (1 + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2 * r2);
    double yDistort = y * (1 + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2 * r2);

    // Tangential distorsion
    xDistort = xDistort + (2 * p1 * x * y + p2 * (r2 + 2 * x * x));
    yDistort = yDistort + (p1 * (r2 + 2 * y * y) + 2 * p2 * x * y);

    // Back to absolute coordinates.
    xDistort = xDistort * fx + cx;
    yDistort = yDistort * fy + cy;

    return new PointF((float)xDistort, (float)yDistort);
}
  • 1
    I think this solution would undistort the points and not distort them back like OP asked. I am in a similar situation as OP, and multiplying the coefficients by -1 gives me the expected result. – François Pilote Feb 9 '17 at 15:07
  • 1
    @FrançoisPilote: are your coeffs coming from OpenCV? There are other distortion models that use the inverse mapping and produce coefficients that go the other way. I have used the above with success in my own programs. – Joan Charmant Feb 10 '17 at 1:30
  • yes, the coefficients i am using come from opencv, most precisely from calibrateCamera function. – François Pilote Feb 17 '17 at 19:58
  • would this be similar for point clouds? because i have un-distorted point cloud, distortion coefficients and i'd like to apply them – mereth Oct 11 '19 at 7:27
  • Thank you. It works on rectified image generated using cv::undistort(originalDistortedImg, rectifiedImg, K, D, K); – lingjiankong Jan 28 '20 at 0:16
4

You can easily distort back your points using ProjectPoints.

cv::Mat rVec(3, 1, cv::DataType<double>::type); // Rotation vector
rVec.at<double>(0) = 0;
rVec.at<double>(1) = 0;
rVec.at<double>(2) =0;
cv::Mat tVec(3, 1, cv::DataType<double>::type); // Translation vector
tVec.at<double>(0) =0;
tVec.at<double>(1) = 0;
tVec.at<double>(2) = 0;

cv::projectPoints(points,rVec,tVec, cameraMatrix, distCoeffs,result);

PS: in the opencv 3 they added a function for distort.

  • 2
    That distort function is for fish eye camera model, not pinhole camera model which cv::undistortPoints uses. – user202729 Jul 6 '19 at 2:49
2

If you multiply all the distortion coefficients by -1 you can then pass them to undistort or undistortPoints and basically you will apply the inverse distortion which will bring the distortion back.

  • 2
    That's only a first order approximation though, it only works well for small distortions. – Hugo Maxwell Apr 4 '18 at 17:29
1

The OCV camera model (see http://docs.opencv.org/2.4/modules/calib3d/doc/camera_calibration_and_3d_reconstruction.html) describes how a 3D point first maps to an immaginary ideal pinhole camera coordinate and then "distorts" the coordinate so that it models the image of the actual real world camera.

Using the OpenCV distortion coefficients (= Brown distortion coefficients), the following 2 operations are simple to calculate:

  • Calculate the pixel-coordinate in the original camera image from a given pixel-coordinate in the distortion-free (i.e. undistorted image). AFAIK there is no explicit OpenCV function for this. But the code in Joan Charmant's answer does exactly this.
  • Calculate the distortion-free image from the original camera image. This can be done using cv::undistort(....) or alternatively a combination of cv::initUndistortRectifyMap(....) and cv::remap(....).

However the following 2 operations are computionally much more complex:

  • Calculate the pixel coordinate in the distortion-free image from a pixel coordinate in the original camera image. This can be done using cv::undistortPoints(....).
  • Calculate the original camera image from the distortion-free image.

This may sound counter intuitive. More detailed explanation:

For a given a pixel coordinate in the distortion-free image it is easy to calculate the corresponding coordinate in the original image (i.e. "distort" the coordinate).

x = (u - cx) / fx; // u and v are distortion free
y = (v - cy) / fy;

rr = x*x + y*y
distortion = 1 + rr  * (k1 + rr * (k2 + rr * k3))
# I ommit the tangential parameters for clarity

u_ = fx * distortion * x + cx
v_ = fy * distortion * y + cy
// u_ and v_ are coordinates in the original camera image

Doing it the other way round is much more difficult; basically one would need to combine all the code lines above into one big vectorial equation and solve it for u and v. I think for the general case where all 5 distortion coefficients are used, it can only be done numerically. Which is (without looking at the code) probably what cv::undistortPoints(....) does.

However, using the distortion coefficients, we can calculate an undistortion-map (cv::initUndistortRectifyMap(....)) which maps from the distortion-free image coordinates to the original camera image coordinates. Each entry in the undistortion-map contains a (floating point) pixel position in the original camera image. In other words, the undistortion-map points from the distorion-free image into the original camera image. So the map is calculated by exactly the above formula.

The map can then be applied to get the new distortion-free image from the original (cv::remap(....)). cv::undistort() does this without the explicit calculation of the undistorion map.

1

There are some points which I found when tried to redistort points using tips from this topic:

  1. Code in the question is almost right, but has a bug. It uses r^4 after k3 instead of r^6. I rewrote code and successfully run after this simple correction.

xCorrected = x * (1. + k1 * r2 + k2 * r2 * r2 + k3 * r2 * r2 * r2); // Multiply r2 after k3 one more time in yCorrected too

  1. Joan Charman said the right things and equations allow to distort point back (Not undistort, as mentioned in comments under his answer). However, some words are incorrect:

// To relative coordinates <- this is the step you are missing

This is wrong, as the code in this question already useы relative coordinates! It is a trick in OpenCV undistortPoints functions. It has a new intrinsic matrix as the 6th argument. If it is None, than the function returns points in relative coordinates. And this is why the original code in question has this step:

//Step 2 : ideal coordinates => actual coordinates
      xCorrected = xCorrected * fx + ux;
      yCorrected = yCorrected * fy + uy;
  1. Also, I have to say about confusion in the Internet material.

When I started to study this question, I had the same opinion that these equations undistort points, not the opposite.

Recently I have found why. The tutorial of OpenCV and its documentation has the different names. Tutorial uses variables 'xCorrected' and 'yCorrected' for the equations. While in doc the same things have different names: 'xDistorted' and 'yDistorted'

So let's me solve the confuse: Distortion operation can be represented as equations in various distortion models. But Undistortion is only possible through numerical iteration algorithm. There is no analytical solutions to represent undistortion as equations (Because of 6th order part in radial part and nonlinearity)

0

There is no analytical solution to this problem once you distort the coordinates there is no way going back at least analytically with this specific model. It is in nature of radial distortion model, the way it is defined allows to distort in simple analytical fashion but not vice versa. In order to do so one has to solve 7-th degree polynomial for which it is proven that there is no analytical solution.

However the radial camera model is not special or sacred in any way it just simple rule that stretches the pixels outwards or inwards to optical center depending on lens you taken your picture with. The closer to optical center the less distortion pixel receives. There is multitude of other ways to define radial distortion model which could yield not only similar quality of distortion but also provide simple way to define the inverse of distortion. But going this way means that you would need to find optimal parameters for such model yourself.

For instance in my specific case I've found that a simple sigmoid function (offset and scaled) is capable to approximating my existing radial model parameters with MSE integral error less than or equal to 1E-06 even though the comparison between model seems pointles. I don't think that native radial model yields better values and must not be treated as etalon one. Physical lens geometry may vary in a way that is not representable by both models and to better approximate lens geometry a mesh-like approach should be used. However I'm impressed by approximated model because it uses only one free parameter and provides notably accurate result which makes me think which model is actually better for the job.

Here's the plot of original radial model (red) and it's sigmoid approximation (green) on top and also their derivatives (blue lines):

enter image description here

So distortion / undistortion function in my case looked like this:

distort = (r, alpha) -> 2/(1 + exp(-alpha*r)) - 1
undistort = (d, alpha) -> -ln((d + 1)/(d - 1))/alpha

(Please note that distortion is performed in polar coordinates around optical center and affects only distance from optical center (i.e. not the angle itself), r - distance from optical center, alpha is a free parameter that needs to be estimated):

Here's how the distortion looked compared to native radial distortion (green is approximated, red is native radial distortion)

enter image description here

And here's how the inverse mapping of pixels looks like if we were to take a regular pixel grid and try to undistort it:

enter image description here

0

Another way is to use remap to project rectified image to distorted image:

img_distored = cv2.remap(img_rect, mapx, mapy, cv2.INTER_LINEAR)

mapx and mapy are mappings from rectified pixel locations to distorted pixel locations. It can be obtained in below steps:

X, Y = np.meshgrid(range(w), range(h)
pnts_distorted = np.merge(X, Y).reshape(w*h, 2)
pnts_rectified = cv2.undistortPoints(pnts_distorted, cameraMatrix, distort, R=rotation, P=pose)
mapx = pnts_rectified[:,:,0]
mapy = pnts_rectified[:,:,1]

cameraMatrix, distort, rotation, pose are the parameters returned in cv calibration and stereoRectify functions.

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