236

I need to find the frequency of elements in an unordered list

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

output->

b = [4,4,2,1,2]

Also I want to remove the duplicates from a

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
  • Are they always ordered like in that example? – Farinha Jan 29 '10 at 12:11
  • @Peter. Yes, you've sorted the list for the purposes of posting. Will the list always be sorted? – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 12:26
  • 2
    No, the list will not be sorted always. This is not homework. – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:54
  • I am trying to plot the graph of degree distribution of a network. – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:55
  • 5
    @Peter: Please update your question with the useful information. Please do not add comments to your question -- you own the question, you can fix it to be complete and clear. – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 13:43

31 Answers 31

146

Note: You should sort the list before using groupby.

You can use groupby from itertools package if the list is an ordered list.

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
from itertools import groupby
[len(list(group)) for key, group in groupby(a)]

Output:

[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
| improve this answer | |
  • nice, using groupby. I wonder about its efficiency vs. the dict approach, though – Eli Bendersky Jan 29 '10 at 12:20
  • 32
    The python groupby creates new groups when the value it sees changes. In this case 1,1,1,2,1,1,1] would return [3,1,3]. If you expected [6,1] then just be sure to sort the data before using groupby. – Evan Jan 30 '10 at 22:41
  • 4
    @CristianCiupitu: sum(1 for _ in group). – Martijn Pieters Jul 29 '16 at 7:25
  • 6
    This is not a solution. The output doesn't tell what was counted. – buhtz Jul 29 '16 at 13:58
  • 7
    [(key, len(list(group))) for key, group in groupby(a)] or {key: len(list(group)) for key, group in groupby(a)} @buhtz – Eric Pauley Jun 16 '17 at 18:47
530

In Python 2.7 (or newer), you can use collections.Counter:

import collections
a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
counter=collections.Counter(a)
print(counter)
# Counter({1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 2, 5: 2, 4: 1})
print(counter.values())
# [4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
print(counter.keys())
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
print(counter.most_common(3))
# [(1, 4), (2, 4), (3, 2)]

If you are using Python 2.6 or older, you can download it here.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @unutbu: What if I have three lists, a,b,c for which a and b remain the same, but c changes? How to count the the value of c for which a and c are same? – ThePredator Jun 29 '14 at 12:31
  • @Srivatsan: I don't understand the situation. Please post a new question where you can elaborate. – unutbu Jun 29 '14 at 13:27
  • 1
    Is there a way to extract the dictionary {1:4, 2:4, 3:2, 5:2, 4:1} from the counter object ? – Pavan Mar 22 '15 at 0:38
  • 7
    @Pavan: collections.Counter is a subclass of dict. You can use it in the same way you would a normal dict. If you really want a dict, however, you could convert it to a dict using dict(counter). – unutbu Mar 22 '15 at 0:46
  • 1
    Works in 3.6 also, so assume anything greater than 2.7 – kpierce8 Nov 15 '17 at 22:20
107

Python 2.7+ introduces Dictionary Comprehension. Building the dictionary from the list will get you the count as well as get rid of duplicates.

>>> a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
>>> d = {x:a.count(x) for x in a}
>>> d
{1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 2, 4: 1, 5: 2}
>>> a, b = d.keys(), d.values()
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
| improve this answer | |
  • This works really well with lists of strings as opposed to integers like the original question asked. – Glen Selle Jan 14 '16 at 5:29
  • 15
    It's faster using a set: {x:a.count(x) for x in set(a)} – stenci Feb 17 '16 at 17:55
  • 45
    This is hugely inefficient. a.count() does a full traverse for each element in a, making this a O(N^2) quadradic approach. collections.Counter() is much more efficient because it counts in linear time (O(N)). In numbers, that means this approach will execute 1 million steps for a list of length 1000, vs. just 1000 steps with Counter(), 10^12 steps where only 10^6 are needed by Counter for a million items in a list, etc. – Martijn Pieters Jul 29 '16 at 7:29
  • 3
    @stenci: sure, but the horror of using a.count() completely dwarfs the efficiency of having used a set there. – Martijn Pieters Oct 7 '16 at 23:22
  • 2
    @MartijnPieters one more reason to use it fewer times :) – stenci Oct 8 '16 at 1:14
48

To count the number of appearances:

from collections import defaultdict

appearances = defaultdict(int)

for curr in a:
    appearances[curr] += 1

To remove duplicates:

a = set(a) 
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    +1 for collections.defaultdict. Also, in python 3.x, look up collections.Counter. It is the same as collections.defaultdict(int). – hughdbrown Jan 29 '10 at 13:54
  • 2
    @hughdbrown, actually Counter can use multiple numeric types including float or Decimal, not just int. – Cristian Ciupitu Jul 29 '16 at 8:43
28

In Python 2.7+, you could use collections.Counter to count items

>>> a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
>>>
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> c=Counter(a)
>>>
>>> c.values()
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
>>>
>>> c.keys()
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
| improve this answer | |
25

Counting the frequency of elements is probably best done with a dictionary:

b = {}
for item in a:
    b[item] = b.get(item, 0) + 1

To remove the duplicates, use a set:

a = list(set(a))
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    @phkahler: Mine would only a tiny bit better than this. It's hardly worth my posting a separate answer when this can be improved with a small change. The point of SO is to get to the best answers. I could simply edit this, but I prefer to allow the original author a chance to make their own improvements. – S.Lott Jan 29 '10 at 16:58
  • 1
    @S.Lott The code is much cleaner without having to import defaultdict. – bstrauch24 Jul 28 '18 at 23:04
  • Why not preinitialize b: b = {k:0 for k in a}? – DylanYoung Jan 13 at 21:00
20

Here's another succint alternative using itertools.groupby which also works for unordered input:

from itertools import groupby

items = [5, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5]

results = {value: len(list(freq)) for value, freq in groupby(sorted(items))}

results

{1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 2, 4: 1, 5: 2}
| improve this answer | |
16

You can do this:

import numpy as np
a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
np.unique(a, return_counts=True)

Output:

(array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]), array([4, 4, 2, 1, 2], dtype=int64))

The first array is values, and the second array is the number of elements with these values.

So If you want to get just array with the numbers you should use this:

np.unique(a, return_counts=True)[1]
| improve this answer | |
7
seta = set(a)
b = [a.count(el) for el in seta]
a = list(seta) #Only if you really want it.
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    using lists count is ridiculously expensive and uncalled for in this scenario. – Idan K Jan 29 '10 at 12:20
  • @IdanK why count is expensive? – Kritika Rajain Sep 7 '18 at 11:13
  • @KritikaRajain For each unique element in the list you iterate over the whole list to generate a count (quadratic in the number of unique elements in the list). Instead, you can iterate over the list once and count up the number of each unique element (linear in the size of the list). If your list has only one unique element, the result will be the same. Moreover, this approach requires an additional intermediate set. – DylanYoung Jan 13 at 21:10
7

I would simply use scipy.stats.itemfreq in the following manner:

from scipy.stats import itemfreq

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

freq = itemfreq(a)

a = freq[:,0]
b = freq[:,1]

you may check the documentation here: http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-0.16.0/reference/generated/scipy.stats.itemfreq.html

| improve this answer | |
7
from collections import Counter
a=["E","D","C","G","B","A","B","F","D","D","C","A","G","A","C","B","F","C","B"]

counter=Counter(a)

kk=[list(counter.keys()),list(counter.values())]

pd.DataFrame(np.array(kk).T, columns=['Letter','Count'])
| improve this answer | |
  • While this code snippet may be the solution, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion – Rahul Gupta Dec 28 '17 at 5:16
  • Yes will do that Rahul Gupta – Anirban Lahiri Dec 28 '17 at 20:00
4

For your first question, iterate the list and use a dictionary to keep track of an elements existsence.

For your second question, just use the set operator.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Can you please elaborate on the first answer – Bruce Jan 29 '10 at 12:14
3

This answer is more explicit

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,4,4]

d = {}
for item in a:
    if item in d:
        d[item] = d.get(item)+1
    else:
        d[item] = 1

for k,v in d.items():
    print(str(k)+':'+str(v))

# output
#1:4
#2:4
#3:3
#4:2

#remove dups
d = set(a)
print(d)
#{1, 2, 3, 4}
| improve this answer | |
3
def frequencyDistribution(data):
    return {i: data.count(i) for i in data}   

print frequencyDistribution([1,2,3,4])

...

 {1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1}   # originalNumber: count
| improve this answer | |
3

I am quite late, but this will also work, and will help others:

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
freq_list = []
a_l = list(set(a))

for x in a_l:
    freq_list.append(a.count(x))


print 'Freq',freq_list
print 'number',a_l

will produce this..

Freq  [4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
number[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
| improve this answer | |
2
a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

# 1. Get counts and store in another list
output = []
for i in set(a):
    output.append(a.count(i))
print(output)

# 2. Remove duplicates using set constructor
a = list(set(a))
print(a)
  1. Set collection does not allow duplicates, passing a list to the set() constructor will give an iterable of totally unique objects. count() function returns an integer count when an object that is in a list is passed. With that the unique objects are counted and each count value is stored by appending to an empty list output
  2. list() constructor is used to convert the set(a) into list and referred by the same variable a

Output

D:\MLrec\venv\Scripts\python.exe D:/MLrec/listgroup.py
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
| improve this answer | |
2

Simple solution using a dictionary.

def frequency(l):
     d = {}
     for i in l:
        if i in d.keys():
           d[i] += 1
        else:
           d[i] = 1

     for k, v in d.iteritems():
        if v ==max (d.values()):
           return k,d.keys()

print(frequency([10,10,10,10,20,20,20,20,40,40,50,50,30]))
| improve this answer | |
  • max(d.values()) will not change in the last loop. Don't compute it in the loop, compute it before the loop. – DylanYoung Jan 13 at 21:15
1
#!usr/bin/python
def frq(words):
    freq = {}
    for w in words:
            if w in freq:
                    freq[w] = freq.get(w)+1
            else:
                    freq[w] =1
    return freq

fp = open("poem","r")
list = fp.read()
fp.close()
input = list.split()
print input
d = frq(input)
print "frequency of input\n: "
print d
fp1 = open("output.txt","w+")
for k,v in d.items():
fp1.write(str(k)+':'+str(v)+"\n")
fp1.close()
| improve this answer | |
1
num=[3,2,3,5,5,3,7,6,4,6,7,2]
print ('\nelements are:\t',num)
count_dict={}
for elements in num:
    count_dict[elements]=num.count(elements)
print ('\nfrequency:\t',count_dict)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Please don't post code-only answers but clarify your code, especially when a question already has a valid answer. – Erik A Sep 3 '17 at 19:12
1
from collections import OrderedDict
a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
def get_count(lists):
    dictionary = OrderedDict()
    for val in lists:
        dictionary.setdefault(val,[]).append(1)
    return [sum(val) for val in dictionary.values()]
print(get_count(a))
>>>[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]

To remove duplicates and Maintain order:

list(dict.fromkeys(get_count(a)))
>>>[4, 2, 1]
| improve this answer | |
1

i'm using Counter to generate a freq. dict from text file words in 1 line of code

def _fileIndex(fh):
''' create a dict using Counter of a
flat list of words (re.findall(re.compile(r"[a-zA-Z]+"), lines)) in (lines in file->for lines in fh)
'''
return Counter(
    [wrd.lower() for wrdList in
     [words for words in
      [re.findall(re.compile(r'[a-zA-Z]+'), lines) for lines in fh]]
     for wrd in wrdList])
| improve this answer | |
1

Another approach of doing this, albeit by using a heavier but powerful library - NLTK.

import nltk

fdist = nltk.FreqDist(a)
fdist.values()
fdist.most_common()
| improve this answer | |
0

Yet another solution with another algorithm without using collections:

def countFreq(A):
   n=len(A)
   count=[0]*n                     # Create a new list initialized with '0'
   for i in range(n):
      count[A[i]]+= 1              # increase occurrence for value A[i]
   return [x for x in count if x]  # return non-zero count
| improve this answer | |
0

You can use the in-built function provided in python

l.count(l[i])


  d=[]
  for i in range(len(l)):
        if l[i] not in d:
             d.append(l[i])
             print(l.count(l[i])

The above code automatically removes duplicates in a list and also prints the frequency of each element in original list and the list without duplicates.

Two birds for one shot ! X D

| improve this answer | |
0

This approach can be tried if you don't want to use any library and keep it simple and short!

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
marked = []
b = [(a.count(i), marked.append(i))[0] for i in a if i not in marked]
print(b)

o/p

[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]
| improve this answer | |
0

For the record, a functional answer:

>>> L = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
>>> import functools
>>> >>> functools.reduce(lambda acc, e: [v+(i==e) for i, v in enumerate(acc,1)] if e<=len(acc) else acc+[0 for _ in range(e-len(acc)-1)]+[1], L, [])
[4, 4, 2, 1, 2]

It's cleaner if you count zeroes too:

>>> functools.reduce(lambda acc, e: [v+(i==e) for i, v in enumerate(acc)] if e<len(acc) else acc+[0 for _ in range(e-len(acc))]+[1], L, [])
[0, 4, 4, 2, 1, 2]

An explanation:

  • we start with an empty acc list;
  • if the next element e of L is lower than the size of acc, we just update this element: v+(i==e) means v+1 if the index i of acc is the current element e, otherwise the previous value v;
  • if the next element e of L is greater or equals to the size of acc, we have to expand acc to host the new 1.

The elements do not have to be sorted (itertools.groupby). You'll get weird results if you have negative numbers.

| improve this answer | |
0

Found another way of doing this, using sets.

#ar is the list of elements
#convert ar to set to get unique elements
sock_set = set(ar)

#create dictionary of frequency of socks
sock_dict = {}

for sock in sock_set:
    sock_dict[sock] = ar.count(sock)
| improve this answer | |
0

To find unique elements in the list

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]
a = list(set(a))

To find the count of unique elements in a sorted array using dictionary

def CountFrequency(my_list): 
# Creating an empty dictionary  
freq = {} 
for item in my_list: 
    if (item in freq): 
        freq[item] += 1
    else: 
        freq[item] = 1

for key, value in freq.items(): 
    print ("% d : % d"%(key, value))

# Driver function 
if __name__ == "__main__":  
my_list =[1, 1, 1, 5, 5, 3, 1, 3, 3, 1, 4, 4, 4, 2, 2, 2, 2] 

CountFrequency(my_list)

Reference GeeksforGeeks

| improve this answer | |
-1

One more way is to use a dictionary and the list.count, below a naive way to do it.

dicio = dict()

a = [1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,5]

b = list()

c = list()

for i in a:

   if i in dicio: continue 

   else:

      dicio[i] = a.count(i)

      b.append(a.count(i))

      c.append(i)

print (b)

print (c)
| improve this answer | |
-1
a=[1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3]
b=[0,0,0,0,0,0,0]
for i in range(0,len(a)):
    b[a[i]]+=1
| improve this answer | |

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