1

I am repeatedly executing the ls -l command within /tmp/stream and I receive the following output:

pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 112
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 112812 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 112
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 112812 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi      0 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg~
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 116748 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi      0 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg~
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 117608 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 117608 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi      0 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg~
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 118674 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi      0 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg~
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 118147 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 118147 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi      0 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg~
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $ ls -l
total 116
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 117175 Feb  7 03:32 pic.jpg
pi@dewsaq18 /tmp/stream $

......and so on

My question is - what exactly is going on with the "~" character appended to the second (empty) file? Why doesn't this file show up each time ls -l is executed?

Since I'm using a static filename pic.jpg and the image is overwritten each time a new one is taken, my initial thought was the pic.jpg~ file's use was to compare changes between frames.

However, it isn't always there (maybe there were no changes, so it is not needed?) and, even more so, it is always empty without any data written to it at all.

Thanks for the help and direction in advance.

closed as off-topic by Charles Duffy, Conner, devnull, fedorqui, derobert Mar 6 '14 at 19:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about general computing hardware and software are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve tools used primarily for programming. You may be able to get help on Super User." – Charles Duffy, Conner, devnull, derobert
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4

The tilde (~) at the end of a file name is often used to signify a backup file. So if you have a file foo.bar and you edit it and save it, the new saved file would be foo.bar and the previous version would be foo.bar~. But it's program dependent: not all editors or programs would save the prior version of a file as a backup, and if they do, they don't all follow the convention of appending a tilde (~). It's not literally a standard, but rather a very commonly used convention.

  • i was about to say this should be an answer also here is an example office-recovery.com/excel.asp uses this for their backup files... i imagine a lot of programs follow this convention – clancer Feb 7 '14 at 4:11
  • It's common enough on linux to have an option for the ls command not to show them. It's -B or --ignore-backups. – ooga Feb 7 '14 at 4:16
  • @ooga indeed, it is. I agree. I only shy from the word "standard" in the sense that it hasn't been defined by any standards committee for Linux as a necessary method for naming backups. – lurker Feb 7 '14 at 4:19
  • @mbratch Good point! But re-reading the question, there's still a mystery. Why doesn't it show up every time? He seems to be doing an ls- l over and over and it only shows up sometimes. And when it does, it has a size of 0. – ooga Feb 7 '14 at 4:22
  • 1
    @ooga one possibility is that the backup was created but then the edit (or whatever process was occurring on the jpeg file) was aborted, leaving the original intact and an empty backup file name. A less likely possibility is that it's created as some kind of temporary working file in the same directory, abandoned before it's been filled with data (due to command abort?). – lurker Feb 7 '14 at 4:24

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