I have just found out that my script gives me a fatal error:

Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 268435456 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 440 bytes) in C:\process_txt.php on line 109

That line is this:

$lines = count(file($path)) - 1;

So I think it is having difficulty loading the file into memeory and counting the number of lines, is there a more efficient way I can do this without having memory issues?

The text files that I need to count the number of lines for range from 2MB to 500MB. Maybe a Gig sometimes.

Thanks all for any help.

16 Answers 16

up vote 144 down vote accepted

This will use less memory, since it doesn't load the whole file into memory:

$file="largefile.txt";
$linecount = 0;
$handle = fopen($file, "r");
while(!feof($handle)){
  $line = fgets($handle);
  $linecount++;
}

fclose($handle);

echo $linecount;

fgets loads a single line into memory (if the second argument $length is omitted it will keep reading from the stream until it reaches the end of the line, which is what we want). This is still unlikely to be as quick as using something other than PHP, if you care about wall time as well as memory usage.

The only danger with this is if any lines are particularly long (what if you encounter a 2GB file without line breaks?). In which case you're better off doing slurping it in in chunks, and counting end-of-line characters:

$file="largefile.txt";
$linecount = 0;
$handle = fopen($file, "r");
while(!feof($handle)){
  $line = fgets($handle, 4096);
  $linecount = $linecount + substr_count($line, PHP_EOL);
}

fclose($handle);

echo $linecount;
  • Thanks for the explanation Dominic - that looks good. I had a feeling it had to be done line by line and not letting count of file load the whole thing into memory! – Abs Jan 29 '10 at 14:38
  • 4
    not perfect: you could have a unix-style file (\n) being parsed on a windows machine (PHP_EOL == '\r\n') – nickf Jan 29 '10 at 15:01
  • 1
    Why not improve a bit by limiting the line reading to 1 ? Since we only want to count the number of lines, why not do a fgets($handle, 1); ? – Cyril N. Nov 17 '14 at 15:22
  • 1
    @CyrilN. This depends on your setup. If you're having mostly files that contain only some chars per line it could be faster because you don't need to use substr_count(), but if you are having very long lines you need to call while() and fgets() much more causing a disadvantage. Do not forget: fgets() does not read line by line. It reads only the amount of chars you defined through $length and if it contains a linebreak it stops whatever $length have been set. – mgutt Mar 31 '15 at 4:34
  • 1
    Won't this return 1 more than the number of lines? while(!feof()) will cause you to read an extra line, because the EOF indicator isn't set until after you try to read at the end of file. – Barmar Apr 29 '15 at 12:10

Using a loop of fgets() calls is fine solution and the most straightforward to write, however:

  1. even though internally the file is read using a buffer of 8192 bytes, your code still has to call that function for each line.

  2. it's technically possible that a single line may be bigger than the available memory if you're reading a binary file.

This code reads a file in chunks of 8kB each and then counts the number of newlines within that chunk.

function getLines($file)
{
    $f = fopen($file, 'rb');
    $lines = 0;

    while (!feof($f)) {
        $lines += substr_count(fread($f, 8192), "\n");
    }

    fclose($f);

    return $lines;
}

If the average length of each line is at most 4kB, you will already start saving on function calls, and those can add up when you process big files.

Benchmark

I ran a test with a 1GB file; here are the results:

             +-------------+------------------+---------+
             | This answer | Dominic's answer | wc -l   |
+------------+-------------+------------------+---------+
| Lines      | 3550388     | 3550389          | 3550388 |
+------------+-------------+------------------+---------+
| Runtime    | 1.055       | 4.297            | 0.587   |
+------------+-------------+------------------+---------+

Time is measured in seconds real time, see here what real means

  • Curious how faster (?) it will be if you extend the buffer size to something like 64k. PS: if only php had some easy way to make IO asynchronous in this case – zerkms Dec 12 '13 at 21:51
  • @zerkms To answer your question, with 64kB buffers it becomes 0.2 seconds faster on 1GB :) – Ja͢ck Dec 13 '13 at 3:19
  • 14
    +1 for the benchmark – Rahul Prasad Mar 23 '14 at 12:15
  • 2
    Be careful with this benchmark, which did you run first? The second one will have the benefit of the file already being in disk cache, massively skewing the result. – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 28 '14 at 21:20
  • 6
    @OliCharlesworth they're averages over five runs, skipping the first run :) – Ja͢ck Aug 28 '14 at 23:32

Simple Oriented Object solution

$file = new \SplFileObject('file.extension');

while($file->valid()) $file->fgets();

var_dump($file->key());

Update

Another way to make this is with PHP_INT_MAX in SplFileObject::seek method.

$file = new \SplFileObject('file.extension', 'r');
$file->seek(PHP_INT_MAX);

echo $file->key() + 1; 
  • 3
    The second solution is great and uses Spl! Thanks. – Daniele Orlando Jan 23 '16 at 19:14
  • 2
    Thank you ! This is, indeed, great. And faster than calling wc -l (because of the forking I suppose), especially on small files. – Drasill Feb 18 '16 at 16:44
  • I didn't thought that the solution would be so helpful! – Wallace Maxters Mar 14 '16 at 15:49
  • 3
    Update must be marked as accepted answer! – HPM Aug 5 '17 at 0:11
  • 2
    This is the best solution by far – Valdrinit Oct 25 '17 at 9:58

If you're running this on a Linux/Unix host, the easiest solution would be to use exec() or similar to run the command wc -l $path. Just make sure you've sanitized $path first to be sure that it isn't something like "/path/to/file ; rm -rf /".

  • I am on a windows machine! If I was, I think that would be the best solution! – Abs Jan 29 '10 at 14:39
  • 22
    @ghostdog74: Why, yes, you're right. It is non-portable. That's why I explicitly acknowledged my suggestion's non-portability by prefacing it with the clause "If you're running this on a Linux/Unix host...". – Dave Sherohman Jan 30 '10 at 10:11
  • 1
    Non portable (though useful in some situations), but exec (or shell_exec or system) are a system call, which are considerably slower compared to PHP built-in functions. – Manz Nov 8 '12 at 2:15
  • 10
    @Manz: Why, yes, you're right. It is non-portable. That's why I explicitly acknowledged my suggestion's non-portability by prefacing it with the clause "If you're running this on a Linux/Unix host...". – Dave Sherohman Nov 12 '12 at 12:00
  • @DaveSherohman Yes, you're right, sorry. IMHO, I think the most important issue is the time consuming in a system call (especially if you need to use frequently) – Manz Nov 13 '12 at 19:42

There is a faster way I found that does not require looping through the entire file

only on *nix systems, there might be a similar way on windows ...

$file = '/path/to/your.file';

//Get number of lines
$totalLines = intval(exec("wc -l '$file'"));
  • add 2>/dev/null to suppress the "No such file or directory" – Tegan Snyder May 3 '13 at 21:22
  • $total_lines = intval(exec("wc -l '$file'")); will handle file names with spaces. – pgee70 Nov 11 '13 at 12:22
  • Thanks pgee70 didn't come across that yet but makes sense, I updated my answer – Andy Braham Nov 11 '13 at 17:12
  • 5
    exec('wc -l '.escapeshellarg($file).' 2>/dev/null') – Zheng Kai May 30 '14 at 8:32

If you're using PHP 5.5 you can use a generator. This will NOT work in any version of PHP before 5.5 though. From php.net:

"Generators provide an easy way to implement simple iterators without the overhead or complexity of implementing a class that implements the Iterator interface."

// This function implements a generator to load individual lines of a large file
function getLines($file) {
    $f = fopen($file, 'r');

    // read each line of the file without loading the whole file to memory
    while ($line = fgets($f)) {
        yield $line;
    }
}

// Since generators implement simple iterators, I can quickly count the number
// of lines using the iterator_count() function.
$file = '/path/to/file.txt';
$lineCount = iterator_count(getLines($file)); // the number of lines in the file
  • 4
    The try/finally is not strictly necessary, PHP will automatically close the file for you. You should probably also mention that the actual counting can be done using iterator_count(getFiles($file)) :) – NikiC Oct 13 '13 at 9:34

This is an addition to Wallace de Souza's solution

It also skips empty lines while counting:

function getLines($file)
{
    $file = new \SplFileObject($file, 'r');
    $file->setFlags(SplFileObject::READ_AHEAD | SplFileObject::SKIP_EMPTY | 
SplFileObject::DROP_NEW_LINE);
    $file->seek(PHP_INT_MAX);

    return $file->key() + 1; 
}

If you're under linux you can simply do:

number_of_lines = intval(trim(shell_exec("wc -l ".$file_name." | awk '{print $1}'")));

You just have to find the right command if you're using another OS

Regards

private static function lineCount($file) {
    $linecount = 0;
    $handle = fopen($file, "r");
    while(!feof($handle)){
        if (fgets($handle) !== false) {
                $linecount++;
        }
    }
    fclose($handle);
    return  $linecount;     
}

I wanted to add a little fix to the function above...

in a specific example where i had a file containing the word 'testing' the function returned 2 as a result. so i needed to add a check if fgets returned false or not :)

have fun :)

Counting the number of lines can be done by following codes:

<?php
$fp= fopen("myfile.txt", "r");
$count=0;
while($line = fgetss($fp)) // fgetss() is used to get a line from a file ignoring html tags
$count++;
echo "Total number of lines  are ".$count;
fclose($fp);
?>

You have several options. The first is to increase the availble memory allowed, which is probably not the best way to do things given that you state the file can get very large. The other way is to use fgets to read the file line by line and increment a counter, which should not cause any memory issues at all as only the current line is in memory at any one time.

There is another answer that I thought might be a good addition to this list.

If you have perl installed and are able to run things from the shell in PHP:

$lines = exec('perl -pe \'s/\r\n|\n|\r/\n/g\' ' . escapeshellarg('largetextfile.txt') . ' | wc -l');

This should handle most line breaks whether from Unix or Windows created files.

TWO downsides (at least):

1) It is not a great idea to have your script so dependent upon the system its running on ( it may not be safe to assume Perl and wc are available )

2) Just a small mistake in escaping and you have handed over access to a shell on your machine.

As with most things I know (or think I know) about coding, I got this info from somewhere else:

John Reeve Article

public function quickAndDirtyLineCounter()
{
    echo "<table>";
    $folders = ['C:\wamp\www\qa\abcfolder\',
    ];
    foreach ($folders as $folder) {
        $files = scandir($folder);
        foreach ($files as $file) {
            if($file == '.' || $file == '..' || !file_exists($folder.'\\'.$file)){
                continue;
            }
                $handle = fopen($folder.'/'.$file, "r");
                $linecount = 0;
                while(!feof($handle)){
                    if(is_bool($handle)){break;}
                    $line = fgets($handle);
                    $linecount++;
                  }
                fclose($handle);
                echo "<tr><td>" . $folder . "</td><td>" . $file . "</td><td>" . $linecount . "</td></tr>";
            }
        }
        echo "</table>";
}
  • 5
    Please consider adding at least some words explaining to the OP and to further readers of you answer why and how it does reply to the original question. – b.enoit.be Jul 1 '15 at 21:02

Based on dominic Rodger's solution, here is what I use (it uses wc if available, otherwise fallbacks to dominic Rodger's solution).

class FileTool
{

    public static function getNbLines($file)
    {
        $linecount = 0;

        $m = exec('which wc');
        if ('' !== $m) {
            $cmd = 'wc -l < "' . str_replace('"', '\\"', $file) . '"';
            $n = exec($cmd);
            return (int)$n + 1;
        }


        $handle = fopen($file, "r");
        while (!feof($handle)) {
            $line = fgets($handle);
            $linecount++;
        }
        fclose($handle);
        return $linecount;
    }
}

https://github.com/lingtalfi/Bat/blob/master/FileTool.php

For just counting the lines use:

$handle = fopen("file","r");
static $b = 0;
while($a = fgets($handle)) {
    $b++;
}
echo $b;

I use this method for purely counting how many lines in a file. What is the downside of doing this verses the other answers. I'm seeing many lines as opposed to my two line solution. I'm guessing there's a reason nobody does this.

$lines = count(file('your.file'));
echo $lines;
  • The original solution was this. But since file() loads the entire file in memory this was also the original issue (Memory exhaustion) so no, this isn't a solution for the question. – Tuim Oct 26 '17 at 14:43

protected by Mark Rotteveel Nov 17 at 9:17

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.