11

How should I detect that column moved action is finished in JTable? I've added columnModeListener to my column model but the problem is columnMoved method is called every time a column moves (by certain pixels). I don't want this behavior. I just want to detect when the column dragging is finished.

columnModel.addColumnModelListener(new TableColumnModelListener() {

            public void columnAdded(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnRemoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
                //this is called so many times
                //I don't want this, but something like column moved finished event
                System.out.println("Moved "+e.getFromIndex()+", "+e.getToIndex());
            }

            public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnSelectionChanged(ListSelectionEvent e) {
            }
        });

I hope it is clear what I'm looking for. Thanks.

3
  • Must you know when the user has finished dragging a column, or would it suffice to know when the column order has actually changed (but the user may still drag it further)? – Jason Nichols Jan 29 '10 at 18:16
  • I just want to know when the user has finished dragging a column. How about column order change notification? How should I implement that? – ashokgelal Jan 29 '10 at 18:38
14

This is what I ended up doing. I know it is dirty, but it fits for what I'm looking:

boolean dragComplete = false;
        apTable.getTableHeader().addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e) {
                if (dragComplete) {
                    System.out.println("Drag completed");
                }
                dragComplete = false;
            }
        });
        columnModel.addColumnModelListener(new TableColumnModelListener() {

            public void columnAdded(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnRemoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
                dragComplete = true;
            }

            public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
            }

            public void columnSelectionChanged(ListSelectionEvent e) {
            }
        });
4
  • 1
    +1 dirty or not, this actually works really well for my current app, which (as everyone else's app probably does too) saves width, order, and sort info to a prefs file. I save the file every time the mouse is released in the header, and all of the fluff while dragging and moving and whatnot no longer affects this save. – Ben May 13 '12 at 23:07
  • 1
    I would name the boolean "dragging" or similar, the name you chose is a bit confusing... :-) Thanks for asking this question anyway. – PhiLho Jul 31 '12 at 14:34
  • I do the same, although I have my own table header class, but the concept is the same, and it works. – DejanLekic Nov 8 '12 at 9:19
  • 1
    Tip: add "dragComplete = true" to columnMarginChanged in order to trigger on column resize :) – マルちゃん だよ Nov 5 '14 at 1:51
4

Here's an inner class I use to determine when the column ordering has changed. Note that the user may not have let go of the mouse at this point, so the dragging may continue further.

private class ColumnUpdateListener implements TableColumnModelListener {

   int lastFrom = 0;
   int lastTo = 0;

   private void verifyChange(int from, int to) {
      if (from != lastFrom || to != lastTo) {
         lastFrom = from;
         lastTo = to;

         ///////////////////////////////////////
         // Column order has changed!  Do something here
         ///////////////////////////////////////
      }
   }

   public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
      verifyChange(e.getFromIndex(), e.getToIndex());
   }

   public void columnAdded(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
      verifyChange(e.getFromIndex(), e.getToIndex());
   }

   public void columnRemoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
      verifyChange(e.getFromIndex(), e.getToIndex());
   }

   public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {}
   public void columnSelectionChanged(ListSelectionEvent e) {}

}

It's worked well for me.

3
  • 1
    It's better than the default behavior but still the column order changes more frequently. I just need to observe drag finish because I need save the order of all the columns as soon as drag is completed (I don't want to call my expensive saving method that frequently). I'm posting what I ended up doing. Thanks for writing down the codes though. Might be helpful for someone coming for a similar functionality. – ashokgelal Jan 29 '10 at 18:55
  • +1 given that we can't add a mouse listener to the column this seems to me a clever way to detect that column dragging ended. – sateesh Jan 29 '10 at 18:58
  • Understandable. I wrote the above code because saving the column order to preferences on every columnMoved() event was eating up the CPU. I think the TableColumnModelListener is lacking. – Jason Nichols Jan 29 '10 at 18:58
3

This might be a better approach:

table.setTableHeader(new JTableHeader(table.getColumnModel()) {

      @Override
      public void setDraggedColumn(TableColumn column) {
        boolean finished = draggedColumn != null && column == null;
        super.setDraggedColumn(column);
        if (finished) {
          onColumnChange(table); // Handle the event here...
        }
      }
    });
1
  • Good idea, as the header already has its own mouse listeners, even if JavaDoc says "Application code will not use this method explicitly"... :-) Might need to be combined with the columnMoved event to get the from and to values. – PhiLho Jul 31 '12 at 14:32
1

This is what works for me (both column movements and margin resizes):

I extend the table and override the columnMoved and columnMarginChanged methods in the following way:

... first add some variables for state keeping

private int lastMovementDistance = 0;
private boolean bigMove = false;
private boolean resizeBegan = false;

...

@Override
public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
   super.columnMarginChanged(e);
   if (isShowing()){
      resizeBegan = true;
   }
}

@Override
public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
   super.columnMoved(e);

   //this will be set to 0 when the column is dragged
   //to where it should begin if released       
   lastMovementDistance = Math.abs(getTableHeader().getDraggedDistance());


   if (e.getFromIndex() != e.getToIndex()){
     //note, this does not guarantee that the columns will be eventually
     //swapped - the user may move the column back.
     //but it prevents us from reacting to movements where
     //the user hasn't even moved the column further then its nearby region.
     //Works for me, because I don't care if the columns stay the same
     //I only need the updates to be infrequent and don't want to miss
     //changes to the column order
 bigMove = true;
   }
}

... then in the constructor of my table i do this:

 public MyTable(){

   ...

 getTableHeader().addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter(){

     public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent evt) {  
      if (bigMove && lastMovementDistance == 0 ){
         //react! the tables have possibly switched!
      } 

          else if (resizeBegan){
    //react! columns resized
      }

      resizeBegan = false;
      bigMove = false;
 } 
 });
  ...
}

It is kinda like a hack, but it works for me.

1

Nice answer on your own question ashokgelal. Just a little improvement I think. Your code also trigger on single click on the header. Using one more flag you can prevent the 'dragComplete' trigger when the column haven't really changed. Modified code:

    boolean mDraggingColumn = false;
    boolean mColumnCHangedIndex = false;

    tblObjects.getTableHeader().addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e) {
            if (mDraggingColumn && mColumnCHangedIndex) {
                System.out.println("Column changed");
            }
            mDraggingColumn = false;
            mColumnCHangedIndex = false;
        }
    });
    tblObjects.getColumnModel().addColumnModelListener(new TableColumnModelListener() {
        @Override
        public void columnAdded(TableColumnModelEvent e) {}
        @Override
        public void columnRemoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {}
        @Override
        public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
            mDraggingColumn = true;
            if (e.getFromIndex() != e.getToIndex()) {
                mColumnCHangedIndex = true;
            }
        }
        @Override
        public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {}
        @Override
        public void columnSelectionChanged(ListSelectionEvent e) {}
    });
0

If I understand you correctly, maybe you want to look at the mouse listeners. Maybe the MOUSE_RELEASED event?

6
  • how should I do that? MOUSE_RELEASED on what? table? – ashokgelal Jan 29 '10 at 18:00
  • Are you clicking and dragging a column? At some point, that action will trigger the appropriate mouse events. The MouseListener may not know what it is you're dragging exactly, but you do, and you can just listen for the button to be unpressed. – Jon Jan 29 '10 at 18:05
  • I think your suggestion implies addition of a MouseListener to the JTable. But with that the methods in MouseListener are invoked even when the column isn't dragged. – sateesh Jan 29 '10 at 18:18
  • @sateesh. That's right. I cannot add mouse listener to column model but only to jtable. If I follow this oath, I need to keep a flag to check whether a column has been dragged and the mouse has been released. But this seems so dirty and lengthy. An obvious feature such as this shouldn't be a part of JTable. – ashokgelal Jan 29 '10 at 18:36
  • You're right, it's a bit of a hack. I like the way Jason does it but without knowing the mouse state I don't think there's much you can do. I guess the argument for not tying the move-complete into the table API itself is probably that there's no reason to assume anything's being done with a mouse in the first place. You could be moving with the keyboard, or with other code, etc. Anything mouse-specific would just need a MouseListener, and only graphical components themselves make sense to have them. :/ – Jon Jan 29 '10 at 19:26
-1

All answers fail at one use-case: if the table is in a layout filling up the entire window, then resizing the window will resize the table and thus its columns. By watching for mouse events on the column headers, we fail to receive the event when the user resize the window.

I looked at the JTable&friends source-code, and the columnMarginChanged() method is always called in a sub-sub-sub...-function called by JTable.doLayout().

Then, my solution is to watch for doLayout() calls that trigger at least one columnMarginChanged().

In fact, columnMarginChanged() is called for every columns.

Here is my solution:

private class ResizableJTable extends JTable {

    private TableColumnModelListener columnModelListener;

    private boolean columnsWereResized;

    @Override
    public void setColumnModel(TableColumnModel columnModel) {
        if (getColumnModel() != null) {
            getColumnModel().removeColumnModelListener(columnModelListener);
            columnModelListener = null;
        }

        if (columnModel != null) {
            columnModelListener = new TableColumnModelListener() {

                public void columnSelectionChanged(ListSelectionEvent e) {
                    // Nothing to do
                }

                public void columnRemoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
                    // Nothing to do
                }

                public void columnMoved(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
                    // Nothing to do
                }

                public void columnMarginChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
                    columnsWereResized = true;
                }

                public void columnAdded(TableColumnModelEvent e) {
                    // Nothing to do
                }
            };

            columnModel.addColumnModelListener(columnModelListener);
        }

        super.setColumnModel(columnModel);
    }

    @Override
    public void doLayout() {
        columnsWereResized = false;
        super.doLayout();
        if (columnsWereResized) {
            onColumnsResized();
        }
    }

    /**
     * Sub-classes can override this method to
     * get the columns-were-resized event.
     * By default this method must be empty,
     * but here we added debug code.
     */
    protected void onColumnsResized() {
        int[] columnSizes = getColumnSizes();
        String sizes = "";
        for (int i : columnSizes) {
            sizes += i + " ";
        }
        System.out.println("COLUMNS RESIZED: [ " + sizes + "]");
    }

    protected int[] getColumnSizes() {
        TableColumnModel columnModel = getTableHeader().getColumnModel();
        int columnCount = columnModel.getColumnCount();
        int[] columnSizes = new int[columnCount];

        for(int i = 0; i < columnCount; i++) {
            TableColumn column = columnModel.getColumn(i);
            columnSizes[i] = column.getWidth();
        }

        return columnSizes;
    }
}
1
  • I am not sure what you are trying to say, but I think you might be mistaken. Resizing a column does not move the column. After resizing, the column index is the same. The OP wanted to know a good way of knowing when the "Column Moved" event is done. – hfontanez Jul 17 '15 at 14:44

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