-1

Lets assume a public function:

public boolean doFoo(Enum e) {
    if (e == north) { // do foo north } 
  if (e == south) { // do foo south } 
  if (e == east) { // do foo east } 
  if (e == west) { // do foo west } 

  throw new IllegalArgumentException(" illegal direction " + e);
}

Now lets say we had doFoo as private method, where we have complete control over who passes what. We know that such situation would never be possible. Do we still throw IllegalArgumentException ? Do we return null ?

The question is not as much about enum etc. The code sample was just an example. The question is: how does it make sense to throw illegal argument in private code, where input is in our control?

  • 1
    Why would you think something has to be replaced? – Jeroen Vannevel Feb 8 '14 at 17:26
  • 2
    Why not use the actual Enum as the method argument? This would prevent anything invalid from being passed. – Kevin Bowersox Feb 8 '14 at 17:26
  • 2
    There is no "requirement" on how you must handle error cases - you can throw an exception, return true/false, or anything really - just try to make it consistent with how the rest of your code treats similar situations, and make sure the behavior is documented. – Krease Feb 8 '14 at 17:28
  • If the goal is to throw an exception in case an additional enum value is added (like southeast), and you forgot to handle this new value in the code, then I would use an IllegalStateException or a custom exception instead: the argument is valid, but you forgot to handle it. The accessibility of the method doesn't change anything to how the situation should be handled. – JB Nizet Feb 8 '14 at 17:30
  • 1
    Unless the method is a part of a documented API you're free to report (or not report) errors however you wish. It's purely between you and whoever calls your code. In this case a simple assertion check might be a good choice. – Hot Licks Feb 8 '14 at 17:58
2

It always makes sense to not trust input, even if you're, at least in theory, responsible for that input:

  • you're in control of it now, but there is no guarantee that'll always be the case
  • do you trust yourself never to make mistakes? I certainly don't (trust myself, that is, not you).
  • can you state with 100% certainty that, even if you're currently the sole maintainer of that code, that'll always be the case?
  • ....

There's nothing wrong with and IllegalArgumentException, but in this case, you're not trying to catch an illegal input - rather, you want to protect yourself against programming errors that are in theory impossible (which means that, in practice, they're sure to happen at least once). Java, as well as most programming languages, have a feature for that: assertions.

  • just what i was looking for .. to the point. – JavaDeveloper Feb 8 '14 at 18:05
  • Using the design in the original post, it would be better to throw an IllegalStateException, since the problem would likely be a bigger issue than simply a bad parameter was sent in, like someone updated the enum without telling you. – aliteralmind Feb 8 '14 at 18:10
  • Debatable - I feel that this counts as a "this was meant to be an impossible case and therefore I must freak out" situation, that is, one that must be dealt with by an assertion, but it's purely a matter of preference. Throwing an IllegalStateException is certainly not incorrect, and might indeed be argued to be the better solution in that case. I was trying to address the later part of the question, which is meant not to be about Enum but good programming practices in general. – Nicolas Rinaudo Feb 8 '14 at 18:15
1

The way I characterize statements like this are "go-and-fix" statements. What you've got is an enumeration with a finite set of arguments, and you want to ensure that someone isn't just adding a new enum that your program can't handle just off the bat.

Let's describe that if statement as a switch, with an enum of Cardinality:

switch(e) {
    case Cardinality.NORTH:
        break;
    case Cardinality.SOUTH:
        break;
    case Cardinality.EAST:
        break;
    case Cardinality.WEST:
        break;
    default:
        throw new IllegalStateException("Not a supported state: " e.getName());
}

If your enum only ever has four cases, then it just won't be possible to hit that last condition.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but what happens if someone decides to expand your enum to this:

public enum Cardinality {
    NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST, UP
}

Wait...how do we deal with a cardinality of UP? Seems like we're in an unsupported state, so then the exception should be thrown.

1

If you intend to catch programming errors, then assertion is the feature you are looking for.

Check this out http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/assert.html

1

Yes, it makes sense to also throw an IllegalArgumentException from a private method.

First of all, most of the public methods you write are also going to be called by your own code, where you also are in control of the input. The goal of the exception is to signal a programming error. Whether you have made the error or someone else has is irrelevant: the argument is illegal, so you signal it by throwing an IllegalArgumentException.

Second, a common situation is to have public methods delegate to private ones. So, even if the private method is not directly called by some external client, it is called by some external client indirectly, and you want to signal the error by the most appropriate exception, which is IllegalArgumentException.

1
package  x;
//Enums may not be local. They must be "public enum".
public enum Direction  {
   NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST;
}

//----------------

import  x.Direction;

/**
   <P>{@code java EnumXmpl}</P>
 **/
public class EnumXmpl  {
   public static final void main(String[] igno_red)  {

   }
   public boolean doFoo(Direction e_dir) {
     if (e_dir == Direction.NORTH) {
        // do foo NORTH
     }
     if (e_dir == Direction.SOUTH) {
        // do foo SOUTH
     }
     if (e_dir == Direction.EAST) {
        // do foo EAST
     }
     if (e_dir == Direction.WEST) {
        // do foo WEST
     }
     throw new IllegalArgumentException(" illegal direction " + e_dir);
   }
}

Without the exception, this will not compile. You'll get a missing return statement error. Using this design, it would be better to throw an IllegalStateException, since it would indicate a bigger problem than just a bad parameter being sent in--it means something went wrong, like the enum was updated and recompiled without your knowledge.

You could change it to this

   public boolean doFoo(Direction e_dir) {
     if (e_dir == Direction.NORTH) {
        // do foo NORTH
     }
     if (e_dir == Direction.SOUTH) {
        // do foo SOUTH
     }
     if (e_dir == Direction.EAST) {
        // do foo EAST
     }
     // do foo WEST
  }

You could also do a switch as suggested by @Teo and @Makoto

An alternative is to re-define the enum with specific functionality for each direction:

package  x;
//Enums may not be local. They must be "public enum".
public enum DirectionEnumWithDeltas  {
   NORTH(new NorthFunctionality()),
   SOUTH(new SouthFunctionality()),
   EAST(new EastFunctionality()),
   WEST(new WestFunctionality());
   private final DirectionalFunctionality df;
   DirectionEnumWithDeltas(DirectionalFunctionality d_f)  {
      if(d_f == null)  {
         throw  new NullPointerException("d_f");
      }
      df = d_f;
   }
   public boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance)  {
      return  df.doDirectionalStuff(i_distance);
   }
}
abstract class DirectionalFunctionality  {
   abstract boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance);
}
class NorthFunctionality extends DirectionalFunctionality  {
   public boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance)  {
      //...
      return  true;
   }
}
class SouthFunctionality extends DirectionalFunctionality  {
   public boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance)  {
      //...
      return  true;
   }
}
class EastFunctionality extends DirectionalFunctionality  {
   public boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance)  {
      //...
      return  true;
   }
}
class WestFunctionality extends DirectionalFunctionality  {
   public boolean doDirectionalStuff(int i_distance)  {
      //...
      return  true;
   }
}

And now your function could be redefined as

public boolean doFoo(DirectionEnumWithDeltas e_dir) {
   try  {
      return  e_dir.doDirectionalStuff(3);
   }  catch(NullPointerException npx)  {
      throw  new NullPointerException("e_dir");
   }
}

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