84

I am trying to make a simple scatter plot in pyplot using a Pandas DataFrame object, but want an efficient way of plotting two variables but have the symbols dictated by a third column (key). I have tried various ways using df.groupby, but not successfully. A sample df script is below. This colours the markers according to 'key1', but Id like to see a legend with 'key1' categories. Am I close? Thanks.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(10,1,30).reshape(10,3), index = pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq = 'M', periods = 10), columns = ('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = (4,4,4,6,6,6,8,8,8,8)
fig1 = plt.figure(1)
ax1 = fig1.add_subplot(111)
ax1.scatter(df['one'], df['two'], marker = 'o', c = df['key1'], alpha = 0.8)
plt.show()
108

You can use scatter for this, but that requires having numerical values for your key1, and you won't have a legend, as you noticed.

It's better to just use plot for discrete categories like this. For example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
np.random.seed(1974)

# Generate Data
num = 20
x, y = np.random.random((2, num))
labels = np.random.choice(['a', 'b', 'c'], num)
df = pd.DataFrame(dict(x=x, y=y, label=labels))

groups = df.groupby('label')

# Plot
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.margins(0.05) # Optional, just adds 5% padding to the autoscaling
for name, group in groups:
    ax.plot(group.x, group.y, marker='o', linestyle='', ms=12, label=name)
ax.legend()

plt.show()

enter image description here

If you'd like things to look like the default pandas style, then just update the rcParams with the pandas stylesheet and use its color generator. (I'm also tweaking the legend slightly):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
np.random.seed(1974)

# Generate Data
num = 20
x, y = np.random.random((2, num))
labels = np.random.choice(['a', 'b', 'c'], num)
df = pd.DataFrame(dict(x=x, y=y, label=labels))

groups = df.groupby('label')

# Plot
plt.rcParams.update(pd.tools.plotting.mpl_stylesheet)
colors = pd.tools.plotting._get_standard_colors(len(groups), color_type='random')

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.set_color_cycle(colors)
ax.margins(0.05)
for name, group in groups:
    ax.plot(group.x, group.y, marker='o', linestyle='', ms=12, label=name)
ax.legend(numpoints=1, loc='upper left')

plt.show()

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Why in the RGB example above is the symbol shown twice in the legend? How to show only once? – Steve Schulist Jun 10 '15 at 23:07
  • 1
    @SteveSchulist - Use ax.legend(numpoints=1) to show only one marker. There are two, as with a Line2D, there's often a line connecting the two markers. – Joe Kington Jun 11 '15 at 13:58
  • This code only worked for me after adding plt.hold(True) after the ax.plot() command. Any idea why? – Yuval Atzmon Nov 29 '16 at 17:50
  • set_color_cycle() was deprecated in matplotlib 1.5. There is set_prop_cycle(), now. – a.l.e Nov 11 '19 at 6:06
47

This is simple to do with Seaborn (pip install seaborn) as a oneliner

sns.pairplot(x_vars=["one"], y_vars=["two"], data=df, hue="key1", size=5) :

import seaborn as sns
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
np.random.seed(1974)

df = pd.DataFrame(
    np.random.normal(10, 1, 30).reshape(10, 3),
    index=pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq='M', periods=10),
    columns=('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = (4, 4, 4, 6, 6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 8)

sns.pairplot(x_vars=["one"], y_vars=["two"], data=df, hue="key1", size=5)

enter image description here

Here is the dataframe for reference:

enter image description here

Since you have three variable columns in your data, you may want to plot all pairwise dimensions with:

sns.pairplot(vars=["one","two","three"], data=df, hue="key1", size=5)

enter image description here

https://rasbt.github.io/mlxtend/user_guide/plotting/category_scatter/ is another option.

| improve this answer | |
19

With plt.scatter, I can only think of one: to use a proxy artist:

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(10,1,30).reshape(10,3), index = pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq = 'M', periods = 10), columns = ('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = (4,4,4,6,6,6,8,8,8,8)
fig1 = plt.figure(1)
ax1 = fig1.add_subplot(111)
x=ax1.scatter(df['one'], df['two'], marker = 'o', c = df['key1'], alpha = 0.8)

ccm=x.get_cmap()
circles=[Line2D(range(1), range(1), color='w', marker='o', markersize=10, markerfacecolor=item) for item in ccm((array([4,6,8])-4.0)/4)]
leg = plt.legend(circles, ['4','6','8'], loc = "center left", bbox_to_anchor = (1, 0.5), numpoints = 1)

And the result is:

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
8

You can use df.plot.scatter, and pass an array to c= argument defining the color of each point:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(10,1,30).reshape(10,3), index = pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq = 'M', periods = 10), columns = ('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = (4,4,4,6,6,6,8,8,8,8)
colors = np.where(df["key1"]==4,'r','-')
colors[df["key1"]==6] = 'g'
colors[df["key1"]==8] = 'b'
print(colors)
df.plot.scatter(x="one",y="two",c=colors)
plt.show()

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
3

You can also try Altair or ggpot which are focused on declarative visualisations.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
np.random.seed(1974)

# Generate Data
num = 20
x, y = np.random.random((2, num))
labels = np.random.choice(['a', 'b', 'c'], num)
df = pd.DataFrame(dict(x=x, y=y, label=labels))

Altair code

from altair import Chart
c = Chart(df)
c.mark_circle().encode(x='x', y='y', color='label')

enter image description here

ggplot code

from ggplot import *
ggplot(aes(x='x', y='y', color='label'), data=df) +\
geom_point(size=50) +\
theme_bw()

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
2

It's rather hacky, but you could use one1 as a Float64Index to do everything in one go:

df.set_index('one').sort_index().groupby('key1')['two'].plot(style='--o', legend=True)

enter image description here

Note that as of 0.20.3, sorting the index is necessary, and the legend is a bit wonky.

| improve this answer | |
1

From matplotlib 3.1 onwards you can use .legend_elements(). An example is shown in Automated legend creation. The advantage is that a single scatter call can be used.

In this case:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(10,1,30).reshape(10,3), 
                  index = pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq = 'M', periods = 10), 
                  columns = ('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = (4,4,4,6,6,6,8,8,8,8)


fig, ax = plt.subplots()
sc = ax.scatter(df['one'], df['two'], marker = 'o', c = df['key1'], alpha = 0.8)
ax.legend(*sc.legend_elements())
plt.show()

enter image description here

In case the keys were not directly given as numbers, it would look as

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(10,1,30).reshape(10,3), 
                  index = pd.date_range('2010-01-01', freq = 'M', periods = 10), 
                  columns = ('one', 'two', 'three'))
df['key1'] = list("AAABBBCCCC")

labels, index = np.unique(df["key1"], return_inverse=True)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
sc = ax.scatter(df['one'], df['two'], marker = 'o', c = index, alpha = 0.8)
ax.legend(sc.legend_elements()[0], labels)
plt.show()

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • I got an error saying 'PathCollection' object has no attribute 'legends_elements'. My code is as follows. fig, ax = plt.subplots(1, 1, figsize = (4,4)) scat = ax.scatter(rand_jitter(important_dataframe["workout_type_int"], jitter = 0.04), important_dataframe["distance"], c = color_list, marker = 'o', alpha = 0.9) print(scat.legends_elements()) #ax.legend(*scat.legend_elements()) – Nandish Patel Aug 15 '19 at 10:50
  • 1
    @NandishPatel Check the very first sentence of this answer. Also make sure not to confuse legends_elements and legend_elements. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Aug 15 '19 at 11:18
  • Yes thank you. That was a typo(legends/legend). I was working on something since last 6 hours so Matplotlib version didn't occur to me. I thought I was using the latest one. I was confused that documentation says there is such method but code was giving an error. Thank you again. I can sleep now. – Nandish Patel Aug 15 '19 at 11:36

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