I am coding for the problem in which we got to count the number of common characters in two strings. Main part of the count goes like this

for(i=0; i < strlen(s1); i++) {
    for(j = 0; j < strlen(s2); j++) {
        if(s1[i] == s2[j]) {
            count++;
            s2[j] = '*';
            break;
        }
    }
}

This goes with an O(n^2) logic. However I could not think of a better solution than this. Can anyone help me in coding with an O(n) logic.

  • Can you clarify what "number of common characters" means? Perhaps what the function should return in the case ("aa", "aa"). Possible answers might be 1, 2 or 4. – Paul Hankin Feb 9 '14 at 10:17
  • it should be 2. for case like "cccc" and "ccc" it should return 3 – nomorequestions Feb 9 '14 at 10:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is very simple. Take two int arrays freq1 and freq2. Initialize all its elements to 0. Then read your strings and store the frequencies of the characters to these arrays. After that compare the arrays freq1 and freq2 to find the common characters.

  • As there is a programming contest is going on here and a question is asked with the similar logic, I did't included the code for it. – haccks Feb 9 '14 at 9:52

Your current code is O(n^3) because of the O(n) strlens and produces incorrect results, for example on "aa", "aa" (which your code will return 4).

This code counts letters in common (each letter being counted at most once) in O(n).

int common(const char *a, const char *b) {
    int table[256] = {0};
    int result = 0;
    for (; *a; a++)table[*a]++;
    for (; *b; b++)result += (table[*b]-- > 0);
    return result;
}

Depending on how you define "letters in common", you may have different logic. Here's some testcases for the definition I'm using (which is size of the multiset intersection).

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    struct { const char *a, *b; int want; } cases[] = {
        {"a", "a", 1},
        {"a", "b", 0},
        {"a", "aa", 1},
        {"aa", "a", 1},
        {"ccc", "cccc", 3},
        {"aaa", "aaa", 3},
        {"abc", "cba", 3},
        {"aasa", "asad", 3},
    };
    int fail = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(cases) / sizeof(*cases); i++) {
        int got = common(cases[i].a, cases[i].b);
        if (got != cases[i].want) {
            fail = 1;
            printf("common(%s, %s) = %d, want %d\n",
                   cases[i].a, cases[i].b, got, cases[i].want);
        }
    }
    return fail;
}
  • What if user enter strings aasa and asad? – haccks Feb 9 '14 at 9:56
  • I think table[*b]-- should be table[*b] – Mustafa Chelik Feb 9 '14 at 10:07
  • It depends how you define "letters in common". – Paul Hankin Feb 9 '14 at 10:08
  • @MustafaChelik I think you've downvoted my answer because of an ambiguity in the original question about what the result should be when there's repeated letters. I've added testcases that show that the code is doing what I expect is the right interpretation of "letters in common" – Paul Hankin Feb 9 '14 at 10:21

It can be done in O(n) time with constant space.

The pseudo code goes like this :

int map1[26], map2[26];
int common_chars = 0;

for c1 in string1:
    map1[c1]++;

for c2 in string2:
    map2[c2]++;

for i in 1 to 26:
    common_chars += min(map1[i], map2[i]);
  • what map2[c2]++ does? – Alex Jun 21 '17 at 17:44
  • @Alex, in the second map, increases the count of character c2 by 1. – axiom Jun 21 '17 at 17:56

You can do it with 2n:

int i,j, len1 = strlen(s1), len2 = strlen(s2);
unsigned char allChars[256] = { 0 };
int count = 0;

for( i=0; i<len1; i++ )
{
    allChars[ (unsigned char) s1[i] ] = 1;
}

for( i=0; i<len2; i++ )
{
    if( allChars[ (unsigned char) s1[i] ] == 1 )
    {
        allChars[ (unsigned char) s2[i] ] = 2;
    }
}

for( i=0; i<256; i++ )
{
    if( allChars[i] == 2 )
    {
        cout << allChars[i] << endl;
        count++;
    }
}

Following code traverses each sting only once. So the complexity is O(n). One of the assumptions is that the upper and lower cases are considered same.

 #include<stdio.h>

int main() {
    char a[] = "Hello world";
    char b[] = "woowrd";
    int x[26] = {0};
    int i;
    int index;

    for (i = 0; a[i] != '\0'; i++) {
        index = a[i] - 'a';
        if (index > 26) {
            //capital char
            index = a[i] - 'A';
        }
        x[index]++;
    }

    for (i = 0; b[i] != '\0'; i++) {
        index = b[i] - 'a';
        if (index > 26) {
            //capital char
            index = b[i] - 'A';
        }

        if (x[index] > 0)
            x[index] = -1;
    }

    printf("Common characters in '%s' and '%s' are ", a, b);
    for (i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
        if (x[i] < 0)
            printf("%c", 'a'+i);
    }
    printf("\n");
}
int count(string a, string b) 
{

   int i,c[26]={0},c1[26]={};

   for(i=0;i<a.length();i++)
   {
        if(97<=a[i]&&a[i]<=123)
        c[a[i]-97]++;
   }
   for(i=0;i<b.length();i++)
   {
       if(97<=b[i]&&b[i]<=123)
        c1[b[i]-97]++;
    } 
    int s=0;
    for(i=0;i<26;i++)
    {
        s=s+abs(c[i]+c1[i]-(c[i]-c1[i]));

    }   

    return (s);  
}

This is much easier and better solution

for (std::vector<char>::iterator i = s1.begin(); i != s1.end(); ++i)
{
    if (std::find(s2.begin(), s2.end(), *i) != s2.end())
   {
    dest.push_back(*i);
   }
}

taken from here

  • 3
    Hmm, but isn't this O(n^2)? – Paul Hankin Feb 9 '14 at 9:53
  • here's a better algorithm read string1 read string2 remove all duplicates from string1 for each character in string1 if character exists in string2 thenprint character end for – Olu Feb 9 '14 at 9:59
  • Thanks for that – Olu Feb 9 '14 at 10:38

C implementation to run in O(n) time and constant space.

#define ALPHABETS_COUNT 26 
int commonChars(char *s1, char *s2)
{
    int c_count = 0, i; 
    int arr1[ALPHABETS_COUNT] = {0}, arr2[ALPHABETS_COUNT] = {0};

    /* Compute the number of occurances of each character */
    while (*s1) arr1[*s1++-'a'] += 1;
    while (*s2) arr2[*s2++-'a'] += 1;       

    /* Increment count based on match found */
    for(i=0; i<ALPHABETS_COUNT; i++) {
        if(arr1[i] == arr2[i]) c_count += arr1[i];
        else if(arr1[i]>arr2[i] && arr2[i] != 0) c_count += arr2[i];
        else if(arr2[i]>arr1[i] && arr1[i] != 0) c_count += arr1[i];
    }

    return c_count;

}

First, your code does not run in O(n^2), it runs in O(nm), where n and m are the length of each string.

You can do it in O(n+m), but not better, since you have to go through each string, at least once, to see if a character is in both.

An example in C++, assuming:

  • ASCII characters
  • All characters included (letters, numbers, special, spaces, etc...)
  • Case sensitive

std::vector<char> strIntersect(std::string const&s1, std::string const&s2){

    std::vector<bool> presents(256, false);  //Assuming ASCII
    std::vector<char> intersection;

    for (auto c : s1) {
        presents[c] = true;
    }
    for (auto c : s2) {
        if (presents[c]){
            intersection.push_back(c);
            presents[c] = false;
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

int main() {
    std::vector<char> result; 
    std::string s1 = "El perro de San Roque no tiene rabo, porque Ramon Rodriguez se lo ha cortado";
    std::string s2 = "Saint Roque's dog has no tail, because Ramon Rodriguez chopped it off";

    //Expected: "S a i n t   R o q u e s d g h l , b c m r z p"

    result = strIntersect(s1, s2);
    for (auto c : result) {
         std::cout << c << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

can be easily done using the concept of "catching" which is a sub-algorithm of hashing.

  • 2
    Please be detailed when giving an answer that pretend to be helpful. Your answer raises more doubts than clues. Maybe you should add some examples of what you offer. – Vasily Liaskovsky Jan 1 '17 at 20:01

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.