1

I'm working on a small webapp that normally is built with a relatively complex process and then deployed to WebLogic.

However, the portion I'm working on is using AngularJS, and is all HTML and Javascript. It normally makes ajax calls into another webapp on the same domain. To shorten my development cycle, I'd like to avoid a build process and just reload the browser page.

I think I can do this with "node express", but the details escape me. I've managed to define a very simple app that just serves local files, but now I have to figure out how to detect some of those paths as matching an expression, and reroute those requests to a request to an external domain.

So, if it gets a request for "/diag/stuff.html", "/foo/thing.html", or just "/index.html", it will send back the file matching the same path. However, if the path matches "/fooService/.*", then I have to send back the response from a GET to the same path, but on a different host and port.

This is my trivial app so far:

var express = require('express');
var app = express();

app.use("/", express.static(__dirname));

app.listen(8000);

Update:

I like the proxy idea, so I did a local install of "http-proxy" (I forgot and first did a global install) then changed the script to this:

var express = require('express');
var app = express();
var httpProxy = require('http-proxy');
var proxy = new httpProxy.RoutingProxy();

app.use("/", express.static(__dirname));

app.get('/FooService/*', function(req, res) {
    "use strict";
    return proxy.proxyRequest(req, res, {
    host: "foohost.net",
    port: 80
    });
});

app.listen(8000);

This fails with:

<path>\server.js:4
var proxy = new httpProxy.RoutingProxy();
        ^
TypeError: undefined is not a function
at Object.<anonymous> (<path>\server.js:4:13)

What might be wrong here?

Update:

Would it be useful to see the contents of "console.log(httpProxy)" after that "require"?:

function ProxyServer(options) {
  EE3.call(this);

  this.web = this.proxyRequest           = createRightProxy('web')(options);
  this.ws  = this.proxyWebsocketRequest  = createRightProxy('ws')(options);
  this.options = options;

  this.webPasses = Object.keys(web).map(function(pass) {
return web[pass];
  });

  this.wsPasses = Object.keys(ws).map(function(pass) {
return ws[pass];
  });

  this.on('error', this.onError.bind(this));

}

Does that provide a clue for why "new httpProxy.RoutingProxy()" says it's undefined?

6

You can use http-proxy and forward requests to different host. To install http-proxy you need to run sudo npm install http-proxy. Code that will handle proxy will look like that:

httpProxy = require('http-proxy');
proxy = new httpProxy.RoutingProxy();
(...)
app.get('/fooService/*', function (request, response) {
    "use strict";
    return proxy.proxyRequest(request, response, {
        host : externalHost,
        port : 80
    });
});

UPDATE

Above code is working for http-proxy ~0.10.x. Since then lot of things had changed in library. Below you can find example for new version (at time of writing ~1.0.2):

var httpProxy = require('http-proxy'),
    proxy = httpProxy.createProxyServer({});
(...)
app.get('/fooService/*', function (request, response) {
    "use strict";
    return proxy.web(request, response, {
        target: 'http://fooservice.com'
    });
});
  • This seems like the best way, but I can't get this to work. This fails on "new httpProxy.RoutingProxy()" line, saying "undefined is not a function". – David M. Karr Feb 11 '14 at 0:42
  • I've updated example to new library version – Damian Krawczyk Feb 11 '14 at 8:48
  • Hot dang. That worked. I assume that it's reasonable to change "app.get" to "app.all" if I just want to transparently proxy all requests, not just GET method calls? Is there anything different I have to do in the callback to proxy a POST, for instance? – David M. Karr Feb 11 '14 at 16:20
  • You can bind it to app.all – Damian Krawczyk Feb 11 '14 at 16:51
  • For some reason, after this was working for an hour or so, Firefox now just loads the index.html and bootstrap.css, but doesn't load the javascript. Chrome has no trouble with this, and Firefox also has no trouble if it's running the "full app", which runs in weblogic. With my "node" server" the response for "index.html" doesn't have a Content-Type header. Is that the problem? – David M. Karr Feb 11 '14 at 20:44
0

If redirects meet your need, then that's the easiest solution:

var express = require('express');

var app = express();

app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
app.use(app.router);

app.get('/fooService/*', function(req, res){
    res.redirect(302, 'http://otherdomain.com:2222' + req.path);
});

app.listen(8000);

Note that it's generally considered good practice to use a subdirectory for your static files (like public above). Otherwise you could view your app file itself and anything else you keep in your application root!

  • I'll give this a try. Your advice about subdirectories is taken, but this is not a node application. I'm simply using it as a tool to shorten my development cycle. – David M. Karr Feb 9 '14 at 21:18
  • Understood, but I still feel like your best bet is to put the files you're serving publicly in a subdirectory. It's just good practice, and it's not as if it's difficult...just make a subdir and put your stuff in there. Good luck! Let me know if the redirection works. – Ethan Brown Feb 9 '14 at 21:33
  • Well, I'm not sure it worked. When I used "wget" from a command line to call the server's address with a path that should be redirected, it gave me a result that I would get from the redirected-to server. However, the behavior in my angularjs app is still confusing. In Firebug, I see the 302 and then the 200, and then it hits the breakpoint in my $https error method, showing a 404. I'm confused. – David M. Karr Feb 10 '14 at 0:05
  • Hmmm...sounds like the basic method is sound (if Firebug is correctly recording the 302->200)...you might try searching SO for "Angular AJAX redirect" and see what you get.... – Ethan Brown Feb 10 '14 at 3:32
  • From the AngularJS $http documentation: "A response status code between 200 and 299 is considered a success status and will result in the success callback being called. Note that if the response is a redirect, XMLHttpRequest will transparently follow it, meaning that the error callback will not be called for such responses." – David M. Karr Feb 10 '14 at 19:37

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