9

I have a List of custom a datatype, simplified example (myMovies):

public class Movie
{
    public Int32 TVIndex;
    public string MovieName;
    public string MovieRating;
    public string MovieRuntime;
    public List<Actor> MovieActors;
    public List<MovieArt> MovieImages;
}



public class Actor
{
    public string ActorName;
    public string ActorRole;
}

public class MovieArt
{
    public string ImagePath;
}


List<Movie> myMovies = new List<Movie>(); 

Now I am trying to remove all duplicates from myMovies but ignoring TVIndex.

I have tried looking at

List<Movie> myDistinctMovies = myMovies.Distinct().ToList(); 

But cannot figure out how to ignore TvIndex. Is this possible?

5
  • 3
    you can use Distinct with EqualityComparer – Grundy Feb 10 '14 at 12:11
  • 4
    You can override the Equals and GetHashCode of the Movie datatype. – Peter Feb 10 '14 at 12:11
  • 1
    @Grundy/peer..Example would be great .. – Sai Avinash Feb 10 '14 at 12:17
  • also you can see MoreLINQ DistinctBy method – Grundy Feb 10 '14 at 12:59
  • Working on it.... The only trouble is in the real code Movie have 50 fields, Actor has 15 and MovieArt has 5. Its taking a while!! – Fred Feb 10 '14 at 13:35
3

Based on @Grundy's answer, including implementation:

public class MovieEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<Movie>
{

    public bool Equals(Movie x, Movie y)
    {
        if ( x == null )
            return y == null;

        if ( y == null )
            return x == null;

        if ( object.ReferenceEquals(x, y) )
            return true;

        if ( !string.Equals(x.MovieName, y.MovieName) )
            return false;

        if ( !string.Equals(x.MovieRating, y.MovieRating) )
            return false;

        if ( !string.Equals(x.MovieRuntime, y.MovieRuntime) )
            return false;

        if ( !Enumerable.SequenceEqual(x.MovieActors, y.MovieActors) )
            return false;

        if ( !Enumerable.SequenceEqual(x.MovieImages, y.MovieImages) )
            return false;

        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Movie obj)
    {
        if ( obj == null )
            throw new ArgumentNullException();

        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((obj.MovieName    == null) ? 0 : obj.MovieName.GetHashCode());
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((obj.MovieRating  == null) ? 0 : obj.MovieRating.GetHashCode());
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((obj.MovieRuntime == null) ? 0 : obj.MovieRuntime.GetHashCode());

            if ( obj.MovieActors != null )
            {
                foreach ( var actor in obj.MovieActors )
                    hash = hash * 31 + ((actor == null) ? 0 : actor.GetHashCode());
            }

            if ( obj.MovieImages != null )
            {
                foreach ( var image in obj.MovieImages )
                    hash = hash * 31 + ((image == null) ? 0 : image.GetHashCode());
            }

            return hash;
        }
    }
}

Usage is the same:

List<Movie> myMovies = new List<Movie>
    {
        // ...
    }; 

List<Movie> myDistinctMovies = myMovies.Distinct(new MovieEqualityComparer()).ToList(); 

EDIT

As pointed out by @Tim, you have to do something quite similar for your other custom types if you want to compare by anything other than reference equality.

public class Actor : IEquatable<Actor>
{
    public string ActorName;
    public string ActorRole;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return this.Equals(obj as Actor);
    }

    public bool Equals(Actor other)
    {
        if ( other == null )
            return false;

        if ( object.ReferenceEquals(this, other) )
            return true;

        if ( !string.Equals(this.ActorName, other.ActorName) )
            return false;

        if ( !string.Equals(this.ActorRole, other.ActorRole) )
            return false;

        return true;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((ActorName == null) ? 0 : ActorName.GetHashCode());
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((ActorRole == null) ? 0 : ActorRole.GetHashCode());

            return hash;
        }
    }
}

public class MovieArt : IEquatable<MovieArt>
{
    public string ImagePath;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return this.Equals(obj as MovieArt);
    }

    public bool Equals(MovieArt other)
    {
        if ( other == null )
            return false;

        if ( object.ReferenceEquals(this, other) )
            return true;

        if ( !string.Equals(this.ImagePath, other.ImagePath) )
            return false;

        return true;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;
            hash     = hash * 31 + ((ImagePath == null) ? 0 : ImagePath.GetHashCode());

            return hash;
        }
    }
}
11
  • in GetHashCode possibly need add check for null property value – Grundy Feb 10 '14 at 12:35
  • @Grundy I changed the algorithm :) – Steven Liekens Feb 10 '14 at 12:51
  • yep! that what i mean. But what the magic numbers 17 and 31? – Grundy Feb 10 '14 at 12:52
  • It's a trick that I pulled off the internet that reduces the chance of hashcode collisions. I believe that you can take any set of prime numbers instead of 17 and 31. The algorithm remains the same. – Steven Liekens Feb 10 '14 at 12:57
  • 1
    This won't work because MovieActors and MovieImages contain custom types which also need to override Equals and GetHashCode. The GethashCode implementation should also accumulate the GetHashCode of every image and actor instead of the list's. – Tim Schmelter Feb 10 '14 at 13:02
2

you can use Distinct with EqualityComparer something like this

public class MoviesEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<Movie>
{
    public bool Equals(Movie x, Movie y)
    {
        return ..../* check all needed fields */

    }

    public int GetHashCode(Movie obj)
    {
        return .... /* get hashcode for movie objec*/
    }
}

and use it like

List<Movie> myDistinctMovies = myMovies.Distinct(new MoviesEqualityComparer()).ToList(); 
2
  • 2
    The difficulty is the implementation ;) – Tim Schmelter Feb 10 '14 at 12:29
  • @TimSchmelter yep, if need ignor only one field. Possible using groupping will be simplest – Grundy Feb 10 '14 at 12:31
-1

you could use a LINQ Query may be ...

List<Movie> myDistinctMovies  = (myMovies .GroupBy(p =>p.MovieName,
                                                   p =>p.MovieRating,p=>p.MovieRuntime)
                                          .Select(g => g.First())
                                          .ToList());

Thanks..

5
  • This is my personal preference because it doesn't require creating an implementation of IEqualityComparer<T> (yuck). – Hezi Feb 10 '14 at 12:52
  • Thanks , i feel it is easier and precise too! – rawatdeepesh Feb 10 '14 at 12:57
  • 1
    But this ignores the rating, runtime, actors and images. -1 – Tim Schmelter Feb 10 '14 at 13:00
  • @Tim Schmelter: add the other fields to your group by. I remember that the syntax for multi-key grouping was a bit quirky, but you can find examples. See: link – Hezi Feb 10 '14 at 13:07
  • 1
    @Hezi: that would work if it was a single object but the actors and images are lists with custom types. – Tim Schmelter Feb 10 '14 at 13:15

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