# admin.py
class CustomerAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):  
    list_display = ('foo', 'number_of_orders')

# models.py
class Order(models.Model):
    bar = models.CharField[...]
    customer = models.ForeignKey(Customer)

class Customer(models.Model):
    foo = models.CharField[...]
    def number_of_orders(self):
        return u'%s' % Order.objects.filter(customer=self).count()  

How could I sort Customers, depending on number_of_orders they have?

admin_order_field property can't be used here, as it requires a database field to sort on. Is it possible at all, as Django relies on the underlying DB to perform sorting? Creating an aggregate field to contain the number of orders seems like an overkill here.

The fun thing: if you change url by hand in the browser to sort on this column - it works as expected!

  • "The fun thing: if you change url by hand in the browser to sort on this column - it works as expected!" You mean like: /admin/myapp/customer/?ot=asc&o=2 Are you sure? – Andy Baker Jan 30 '10 at 16:46
  • yeah, both asc and dsc. Maybe it just works with decimals. – mike_k Jan 31 '10 at 13:19
  • I don't think it would work with multiple pages. – Chase Seibert Feb 27 '10 at 5:07
up vote 126 down vote accepted

I loved Greg's solution to this problem, but I'd like to point that you can do the same thing directly in the admin:

from django.db import models

class CustomerAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    list_display = ('number_of_orders',)

    def get_queryset(self, request):
    # def queryset(self, request): # For Django <1.6
        qs = super(CustomerAdmin, self).get_queryset(request)
        # qs = super(CustomerAdmin, self).queryset(request) # For Django <1.6
        qs = qs.annotate(models.Count('order'))
        return qs

    def number_of_orders(self, obj):
        return obj.order__count
    number_of_orders.admin_order_field = 'order__count'

This way you only annotate inside the admin interface. Not with every query that you do.

  • 2
    Yes, this is a much better way. :) – Greg Jan 24 '12 at 4:01
  • 2
    There's a suggested edit on this answer. I voted to reject it because it removed too much text. I don't know Django, I have no idea whether the proposed code change is worth mentioning. – Gilles Apr 14 '12 at 20:32
  • 7
    Custom list_display fields take 2 arguments: self and obj. number_of_orders should be def number_of_orders(self, obj): – Eric Apr 30 '13 at 13:49
  • 1
    @Gilles the suggested edit is correct about a simpler number_of_orders definition. This works: def number_of_orders(self, obj): return obj.order__count – Nils Nov 15 '13 at 18:43
  • 2
    should be get_queryset(self, request):... for Django 1.6+ – michael Mar 2 '16 at 16:18

I haven't tested this out (I'd be interested to know if it works) but what about defining a custom manager for Customer which includes the number of orders aggregated, and then setting admin_order_field to that aggregate, ie

from django.db import models 


class CustomerManager(models.Manager):
    def get_query_set(self):
        return super(CustomerManager, self).get_query_set().annotate(models.Count('order'))

class Customer(models.Model):
    foo = models.CharField[...]

    objects = CustomerManager()

    def number_of_orders(self):
        return u'%s' % Order.objects.filter(customer=self).count()
    number_of_orders.admin_order_field = 'order__count'

EDIT: I've just tested this idea and it works perfectly - no django admin subclassing required!

  • just read documentation :) – Vladimir Feb 6 '13 at 8:12
  • 1
    This is better answer compared to the accepted one. The issue I ran into applying the accepted one is when you search something along with that updated queryset at the admin level, it takes too much time and also comes up with wrong count for the results it found. – Mutant Mar 22 at 11:30

The only way I can think of is to denormalize the field. That is - create a real field that get's updated to stay in sync with the fields it is derived from. I usually do this by overriding save on eith the model with the denormalized fields or the model it derives from:

# models.py
class Order(models.Model):
    bar = models.CharField[...]
    customer = models.ForeignKey(Customer)
    def save(self):
        super(Order, self).save()
        self.customer.number_of_orders = Order.objects.filter(customer=self.customer).count()
        self.customer.save()

class Customer(models.Model):
    foo = models.CharField[...]
    number_of_orders = models.IntegerField[...]
  • 1
    This certainly should work, but can't mark it as accepted due to extra DB field involved. Also note missing .count() at the end of query-set line. – mike_k Feb 2 '10 at 17:08
  • fixed the count(). The only other solution (short of subclassing large chunks of contrib.admin) would be a Jquery/Ajaxy hack. – Andy Baker Feb 3 '10 at 8:21

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