Error: Arithmetic overflow error converting expression to data type nvarchar.

UPDATE [dbo].ForecastAccuracyKeyAccounts
SET ThreeMonthPercent = ((Actual - ThreeMonthForecast) / Actual) * 100, SixMonthPercent = ((Actual - SixMonthForecast) / Actual) * 100, 
NineMonthPercent = ((Actual - NineMonthForecast) / Actual) * 100
WHERE Actual != 0

Since, I am dividing by Actual, I want to ensure that Actual is not equal to zero. But when I add the statement in the WHERE CLAUSE I cannot get rid of the error.

  • what data types are your columns? It looks like there is something funky going on with type conversions – Brad Feb 10 '14 at 20:00
  • What database are you using? – Gordon Linoff Feb 10 '14 at 20:04
  • Actual float; ThreeMonthPercent nvarchar(7); ThreeMonthForecast float; This worked fine before I added the Where Clause. The only error I would get is when the Actual column was 0. – ahsatan Feb 10 '14 at 20:04
  • SQL Server 2008 – ahsatan Feb 10 '14 at 20:05
  • Can you show the values that are causing the expression to fail? – Gordon Linoff Feb 10 '14 at 20:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe try ISNULL

   

UPDATE [dbo].ForecastAccuracyKeyAccounts

    SET ThreeMonthPercent = ((Actual - ISNULL(ThreeMonthForecast,0)) / Actual) * 100,

    SixMonthPercent = ((Actual - ISNULL(SixMonthForecast,0)) / Actual) * 100, 

    NineMonthPercent = ((Actual - ISNULL(NineMonthForecast,0)) / Actual) * 100

    WHERE Actual != 0
  • Sorry about the formatting, i'm posting from my mobile phone. You have a NULL value for ThreeMonthForecast. That is the problem. Using IsNull should fix it. – Rick S Feb 10 '14 at 20:52
  • This does not work, I still get the overflow error. Thank you for your help though! It's tough typing from a cellphone! – ahsatan Feb 10 '14 at 20:56
  • Can you increase the size of your nvarchar(7) and see if that helps. – Rick S Feb 10 '14 at 20:57
  • I support change the data type as a whole? This is a percentage, so maybe change it to decimal? – ahsatan Feb 10 '14 at 21:03
  • Change your ThreeMonthPercent, SixmonthPercent and NineMonthPercent to float and see if that helps. – Rick S Feb 10 '14 at 21:05

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