97

I have abandoned all hope of ever being able to overload my constructors in PHP, so what I'd really like to know is why.

Is there even a reason for it? Does it create inherently bad code? Is it widely accepted language design to not allow it, or are other languages nicer than PHP?

  • One thing is certain. The lack of explicit constructor overloading, as in the Java or C++ sense, makes you think hard about what should truly be in the parameter list (given that many will overcome this problem using default values for function parameters). :-) – Anthony Rutledge Feb 13 '17 at 19:13

13 Answers 13

58

You can use variable arguments to produce the same effect. Without strong typing, it doesn't make much sense to add, given default arguments and all of the other "work arounds."

133

You can't overload ANY method in PHP. If you want to be able to instantiate a PHP object while passing several different combinations of parameters, use the factory pattern with a private constructor.

For example:

public MyClass {
    private function __construct() {
    ...
    }

    public static function makeNewWithParameterA($paramA) {
        $obj = new MyClass(); 
        // other initialization
        return $obj;
    }

    public static function makeNewWithParametersBandC($paramB, $paramC) {
        $obj = new MyClass(); 
        // other initialization
        return $obj;
    }
}

$myObject = MyClass::makeNewWithParameterA("foo");
$anotherObject = MyClass::makeNewWithParametersBandC("bar", 3);
  • 14
    +1 For clean-ness, this method states with clear intent what you are trying to achieve and for me is a lot cleaner. – Sam Giles Mar 4 '12 at 15:01
  • 4
    doesn't this break Single Responsibility Principle? You are creating your class (one responsibility), and you are also doing various class-functions (your main class responsibility). And in real-world scenarious you may need to read some of the $parameters from outside sources i.e. Databases, which creates yet another responsibility. – Dennis Mar 25 '14 at 21:05
  • 3
    I am new to PHP -- having done tons of Java: HOLY limitation batman! Your example doesn't even follow the factory pattern. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern – Christian Bongiorno Jun 29 '15 at 18:15
  • 1
    @Chrisian It's a static factory method. See Factory (object-oriented programming) for more general information about factories. They're really anything that creates an object instead of using new. – J.D. Sandifer Jul 8 '17 at 3:13
  • 1
    As @J.D.Sandifer said, it's a factory. If anyone does not like "static factories" for clean code, you can always create a MyClassFactory object that has makeNewWithParameterA() and makeNewWithParametersBandC() without being static, so they are more suitable for "dependency injection" frameworks. But if you control the environment and don't want to create the "factory class" this is the cleanest way, as @SamGiles said. The solutions with same constructor and switch-cases to invoke private methods are bad code. – Xavi Montero Jul 4 '18 at 17:28
5

True overloading is indeed unsupported in PHP. As @Pestilence mentioned, you can use variable arguments. Some people just use an Associative Array of various options to overcome this.

5

For completeness, I'll suggest Fluent Interfaces. The idea is that by adding return $this; to the end of your methods you can chain calls together. So instead of

$car1 = new Car('blue', 'RWD');
$car2 = new Car('Ford', '300hp');

(which simply wouldn't work), you can do:

$car = (new Car)
       ->setColor('blue')
       ->setMake('Ford')
       ->setDrive('FWD');

That way you can pick exactly which properties you want to set. In a lot of ways it's similar to passing in an array of options to your initial call:

$car = new Car(['make' => 'Ford', 'seats' => 5]);
  • Well I have to say this is the way I like the most, very readable and flexible – Mirko Sep 5 '16 at 18:33
  • 4
    But it's not immutable and you can instantiate the class with an invalid state. – Pedro Amaral Couto Apr 14 '17 at 0:22
  • This breaks the idea behind ValueObjects that should never have setters. – Xavi Montero Jul 4 '18 at 17:23
  • Another problem is that you are not certain if all variables are set that are required to be set. Secondly no compile-time error is thrown, rather you have to rely on a runtime error that may or may not occur depending on the usage of the variables. – Mazzy Jan 10 at 21:05
4

PHP Manual: Function Arguments, Default Values

I have overcome this simply by using default values for function parameters. In __constuct, list the required parameters first. List the optional parameters after that in the general form $param = null.

class User
{
    private $db;
    private $userInput;

    public function __construct(Database $db, array $userInput = null)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
        $this->userInput = $userInput;
    }
}

This can be instantiated as:

$user = new User($db)

or

$user = new User($db, $inputArray);

This is not a perfect solution, but I have made this work by separating parameters into absolutely mandatory parameters no matter when the object is constructed, and, as a group, optional parameters listed in order of importance.

It works.

2

they say this work:

<?php
class A
{
    function __construct()
    {
        $a = func_get_args();
        $i = func_num_args();
        if (method_exists($this,$f='__construct'.$i)) {
            call_user_func_array(array($this,$f),$a);
        }
    }

    function __construct1($a1)
    {
        echo('__construct with 1 param called: '.$a1.PHP_EOL);
    }

    function __construct2($a1,$a2)
    {
        echo('__construct with 2 params called: '.$a1.','.$a2.PHP_EOL);
    }

    function __construct3($a1,$a2,$a3)
    {
        echo('__construct with 3 params called: '.$a1.','.$a2.','.$a3.PHP_EOL);
    }
}
$o = new A('sheep');
$o = new A('sheep','cat');
$o = new A('sheep','cat','dog');

// results:
// __construct with 1 param called: sheep
// __construct with 2 params called: sheep,cat
// __construct with 3 params called: sheep,cat,dog
?>

and, it seem every one are happy with it, but for me it didn't work... if you get it to work, its one kind of overloading too...

it take all argoments and pass them to the secondary function constructor...

  • people who will try this, don't bother. It won't work, __construct<1-3> do not extend the default constructor and are basically the same as any other custom function in a class right now – xorinzor Jan 30 '14 at 14:51
  • So how does this work with type-hinting? RIght now it is only looking at the amount of variables – Mazzy Jan 10 at 21:10
  • @Mazzy since 2012 i didn't wrote any PHP code, so i'm afraid i should say, type hinting doesn't ring a bell in my head – deadManN Jan 12 at 7:18
2
<?php
//php do not automatically call parent class constructor at all if child class has constructor so you have to call parent class constructor explicitly, however parent class constructor is called automatically if child class has no constructor
class MyClass 
{
    function construct1($value1)
    {
        echo "<br/> dummy constructor is called with 1 arguments and it is $value1";
    }
    function construct2($value1,$value2)
    {
        echo "<br/> dummy constructor is called with 2 arguments and it is $value1, $value2";
    }
    function construct3($value1,$value2,$value3)
    {
        echo "<br/> dummy constructor is called with 3 arguments and it is $value1, $value2 , $value3";
    } 
    public function __construct()
    {
        $NoOfArguments = func_num_args(); //return no of arguments passed in function
        $arguments = func_get_args();
        echo "<br/> child constructor is called $NoOfArguments";
        switch ($NoOfArguments) {
            case 1:
                 self::construct1($arguments[0]);
                break;
            case 2:
                self::construct2($arguments[0],$arguments[1]);
                break;

            case 3:
                self::construct3($arguments[0],$arguments[1],$arguments[2]);
                break;

            default:
                echo "Invalid No of arguments passed";
                break;
        }
    }


}
$c = new MyClass();
$c2 = new MyClass("ankit");
$c2 = new MyClass("ankit","Jiya");
$c2 = new MyClass("ankit","Jiya","Kasish");

?>

1

I'm really no OOP expert, but as I understand it overloading means the ability of a method to act differently depending in the parameters it receives as input. This is very much possible with PHP, you just don't declare the input types since PHP does not have strong typing, and all the overloading is done at runtime instead of compile time.

  • 4
    Actually, overloading means to run a different function depending on the number (and types, for strongly-typed languages) of arguments. This is different than having the same function behave differently. For instance, I am now editing a class created by someone who had heard of OOP but didn't know how to use it. I would like to create a constructor that my code will call, but I don't want to break her working code. – dotancohen Mar 29 '13 at 8:09
1

You can use conditional statements in your constructor and then perform your task. Eg.

  class Example
  {
      function __construct($no_of_args)

      {// lets assume 2
          switch($no_of_args)
          {
              case 1:
                // write your code
              break;
              case 2:
                //write your 2nd set of code
              break;
              default:
           //write your default statement
         }
      }
   }

    $object1 = new Example(1);  // this will run your 1st case
    $object2 = new Example(2);  // this will run your 2nd case

and so on...

1

You can of course overload any function in PHP using __call() and __callStatic() magic methods. It is a little bit tricky, but the implementation can do exactly what your are looking for. Here is the resource on the official PHP.net website:

https://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.overloading.php#object.call

And here is the example which works for both static and non-static methods:

class MethodTest
{
    public function __call($name, $arguments)
    {
        // Note: value of $name is case sensitive.
        echo "Calling object method '$name' "
             . implode(', ', $arguments). "\n";
    }

    /**  As of PHP 5.3.0  */
    public static function __callStatic($name, $arguments)
    {
        // Note: value of $name is case sensitive.
        echo "Calling static method '$name' "
             . implode(', ', $arguments). "\n";
    }
}

$obj = new MethodTest;
$obj->runTest('in object context');

MethodTest::runTest('in static context');  // As of PHP 5.3.0

And you can apply this to constructors by using the following code in the __construct():

$clsName = get_class($this);
$clsName->methodName($args);

Pretty easy. And you may want to implement __clone() to make a clone copy of the class with the method that you called without having the function that you called in every instance...

0

As far as I know, constructor overloading in PHP is not allowed, simply because the developers of PHP did not include that functionality - this is one of the many complaints about PHP.

I've heard of tricks and workarounds, but true overloading in the OOP sense is missing. Maybe in future versions, it will be included.

0

I think we can also use constructor with default arguments as a potential substitute to constructor overloading in PHP.

Still, it is really sad that true constructor overloading is not supported in PHP.

0
<?php

    class myClass {

        public $param1 = 'a';
        public $param2 = 'b';

        public function __construct($param1 = NULL, $param2 = NULL) {

            if ($param1 == NULL && $param2 == NULL) {
//                $this->param1 = $param1;
//                $this->param2 = $param2;
            } elseif ($param1 == NULL && $param2 !== NULL) {
//                $this->param1 = $param1;
                $this->param2 = $param2;
            } elseif ($param1 !== NULL && $param2 == NULL) {
                $this->param1 = $param1;
//                $this->param2 = $param2;                
            } else {
                $this->param1 = $param1;
                $this->param2 = $param2;
            }

        }

    }

//    $myObject  = new myClass();
//    $myObject  = new myClass(NULL, 2);
    $myObject  = new myClass(1, '');
//    $myObject  = new myClass(1, 2);

    echo $myObject->param1;
    echo "<br />";
    echo $myObject->param2;

?>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.