32

I'm using numpy to initialize a pixel array to a gray checkerboard (the classic representation for "no pixels", or transparent). It seems like there ought to be a whizzy way to do it with numpy's amazing array assignment/slicing/dicing operations, but this is the best I've come up with:

w, h = 600, 800
sq = 15    # width of each checker-square
pix = numpy.zeros((w, h, 3), dtype=numpy.uint8)
# Make a checkerboard
row = [[(0x99,0x99,0x99),(0xAA,0xAA,0xAA)][(i//sq)%2] for i in range(w)]
pix[[i for i in range(h) if (i//sq)%2 == 0]] = row
row = [[(0xAA,0xAA,0xAA),(0x99,0x99,0x99)][(i//sq)%2] for i in range(w)]
pix[[i for i in range(h) if (i//sq)%2 == 1]] = row

It works, but I was hoping for something simpler.

2
  • I think you mean numpy.zeros((h, w, 3), ...) (flipping w and h).
    – Falko
    Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 9:04
  • 1
    I found this solution: np.tile( np.array([[0,1],[1,0]]), (h, w))
    – moon
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 18:14

29 Answers 29

39
def checkerboard(shape):
    return np.indices(shape).sum(axis=0) % 2

Most compact, probably the fastest, and also the only solution posted that generalizes to n-dimensions.

6
  • 3
    Very clever implementation!
    – Brionius
    Commented May 24, 2020 at 16:48
  • 3
    Can someone explain this solution? Commented Aug 2, 2020 at 7:35
  • 2
    @HazimAhmed np.indices(shape) creates two different arrays, one with ascending integers in each row and one with ascending integers in each column. once you sum them you get a single matrix that has ascending integers in both rows and columns (e.g. the first row going from [0,...,9] the second row coing from [1,...,10] etc.). once you take the modulo operation you get alternating remainders in rows and columns - which is exactly a checkerboard. clever implementation indeed. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 8:48
  • This does computation (sum, mod) and is significantly slower than other suggested solutions. Commented Jul 27, 2021 at 18:37
  • Its certainly not computationally optimal in any sense; though in numpy-practice the sum or mods will matter little; its three operations, each of which will go over the whole array once; that memory access pattern is the main bottleneck; any solution that splits it up into more array-operations, or which does not use array operations but some form of python iteration, like the second most upvoted example (which does not use any sums or mods), is certain to be much slower. Commented Jul 27, 2021 at 20:10
24

I'd use the Kronecker product kron:

np.kron([[1, 0] * 4, [0, 1] * 4] * 4, np.ones((10, 10)))

The checkerboard in this example has 2*4=8 fields of size 10x10 in each direction.

1
  • Elegant & algebraic answer! A possible improvement (as with most other answers) would be to use the OP's original greyscale to illustrate generality.
    – Tanaya
    Commented Sep 7, 2016 at 2:34
15

this ought to do it

any size checkerboard you want (just pass in width and height, as w, h); also i have hard-coded cell height/width to 1, though of course this could also be parameterized so that an arbitrary value is passed in:

>>> import numpy as NP

>>> def build_checkerboard(w, h) :
      re = NP.r_[ w*[0,1] ]              # even-numbered rows
      ro = NP.r_[ w*[1,0] ]              # odd-numbered rows
      return NP.row_stack(h*(re, ro))


>>> checkerboard = build_checkerboard(5, 5)

>>> checkerboard
 Out[3]: array([[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
               [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
               [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
               [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
               [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
               [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
               [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
               [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
               [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
               [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0]])

with this 2D array, it's simple to render an image of a checkerboard, like so:

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as PLT

>>> fig, ax = PLT.subplots()
>>> ax.imshow(checkerboard, cmap=PLT.cm.gray, interpolation='nearest')
>>> PLT.show()
4
  • This is close, although you have to be careful of a few things: I wanted the checks to be more than 1 pixel across (I had them as 15), and you can't assume that the checks will fit evenly into the width and height of the checkerboard desired. Commented Jan 30, 2010 at 21:50
  • Nice! ro can be written simply as re^1. (just XORing re with 1) Commented Nov 10, 2011 at 3:12
  • 1
    This works for even and non-even width / height: import numpy def checkerboard(w, h, a=0, b=1): row0 = numpy.r_[ int(w/2.0) * [a,b] + (w % 2) * [a] ] row1 = row0^1 return numpy.row_stack( int(h/2.0) * (row0, row1) + (h % 2) * (row0,) ) Commented Feb 13, 2015 at 17:17
  • The answer should be edited to allow for odd width/height. Commented Jul 27, 2021 at 18:37
7

Here's another way to do it using ogrid which is a bit faster:

import numpy as np
import Image

w, h = 600, 800
sq = 15
color1 = (0xFF, 0x80, 0x00)
color2 = (0x80, 0xFF, 0x00)

def use_ogrid():
    coords = np.ogrid[0:w, 0:h]
    idx = (coords[0] // sq + coords[1] // sq) % 2
    vals = np.array([color1, color2], dtype=np.uint8)
    img = vals[idx]
    return img

def use_fromfunction():
    img = np.zeros((w, h, 3), dtype=np.uint8)
    c = np.fromfunction(lambda x, y: ((x // sq) + (y // sq)) % 2, (w, h))
    img[c == 0] = color1
    img[c == 1] = color2
    return img

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for f in (use_ogrid, use_fromfunction):
        img = f()
        pilImage = Image.fromarray(img, 'RGB')
        pilImage.save('{0}.png'.format(f.func_name))

Here are the timeit results:

% python -mtimeit -s"import test" "test.use_fromfunction()"
10 loops, best of 3: 307 msec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s"import test" "test.use_ogrid()"
10 loops, best of 3: 129 msec per loop
2
  • Can you adapt this so that it will work if my pixel colors aren't pure gray? Suppose I wanted the two colors to be (0xFF,0x80,0x00) and (0x80,0xFF,0x00) Commented Jan 31, 2010 at 16:16
  • Sure. It was a bad design choice on my part to assume the color had to be gray...
    – unutbu
    Commented Jan 31, 2010 at 17:22
6

You can use Numpy's tile function to get checkerboard array of size n*m where n and m should be even numbers for the right result...

def CreateCheckboard(n,m):
    list_0_1 = np.array([ [ 0, 1], [ 1, 0] ])
    checkerboard = np.tile(list_0_1, ( n//2, m//2)) 
    print(checkerboard.shape)
    return checkerboard
CreateCheckboard(4,6)

which gives the output:

(4, 6)
array([[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0]])

1
  • 1
    Welcome to StackOverflow! The SO community tries to collect curated, high-quality answers, to be shared with everyone. When responding to such old questions, you should make sure that your answer addresses the original question, is properly formatted, and provides new value. The code you shared but does not directly improve any of the current answers; maybe try to condensate your idea into a comment instead? Commented Jul 4, 2019 at 12:40
6

You can use the step of start:stop:step for slicing method to update a matrix horizontally and vertically: Here x[1::2, ::2] picks every other element starting from the first element on the row and for every second row of the matrix.

import numpy as np
print("Checkerboard pattern:")
x = np.zeros((8,8),dtype=int)
# (odd_rows, even_columns)
x[1::2,::2] = 1
# (even_rows, odd_columns)
x[::2,1::2] = 1
print(x)
1
  • 1
    I feel like this is the answer, and the rest are really complicated...
    – user49404
    Commented May 4, 2020 at 22:48
5

Late, but for posterity:

def check(w, h, c0, c1, blocksize):
  tile = np.array([[c0,c1],[c1,c0]]).repeat(blocksize, axis=0).repeat(blocksize, axis=1)
  grid = np.tile(tile, ( h/(2*blocksize)+1, w/(2*blocksize)+1, 1))
  return grid[:h,:w]
4

I'm not sure if this is better than what I had:

c = numpy.fromfunction(lambda x,y: ((x//sq) + (y//sq)) % 2, (w,h))
self.chex = numpy.array((w,h,3))
self.chex[c == 0] = (0xAA, 0xAA, 0xAA)
self.chex[c == 1] = (0x99, 0x99, 0x99)
4

A perfplot analysis shows that the best (fastest, most readable, memory-efficient) solution is via slicing,

def slicing(n):
    A = np.zeros((n, n), dtype=int)
    A[1::2, ::2] = 1
    A[::2, 1::2] = 1
    return A

The stacking solution is a bit faster large matrices, but arguably less well readable. The top-voted answer is also the slowest.

enter image description here

Code to reproduce the plot:

import numpy as np
import perfplot


def indices(n):
    return np.indices((n, n)).sum(axis=0) % 2


def slicing(n):
    A = np.zeros((n, n), dtype=int)
    A[1::2, ::2] = 1
    A[::2, 1::2] = 1
    return A


def tile(n):
    return np.tile([[0, 1], [1, 0]], (n // 2, n // 2))


def stacking(n):
    row0 = np.array(n // 2 * [0, 1] + (n % 2) * [0])
    row1 = row0 ^ 1
    return np.array(n // 2 * [row0, row1] + (n % 2) * [row0])


def ogrid(n):
    coords = np.ogrid[0:n, 0:n]
    return (coords[0] + coords[1]) % 2


b = perfplot.bench(
    setup=lambda n: n,
    kernels=[slicing, indices, tile, stacking, ogrid],
    n_range=[2 ** k for k in range(14)],
    xlabel="n",
)
b.save("out.png")
b.show()
1
  • An upvote from me; note that when I claimed 'probably the fastest', the kron was the most upvoted answer which isnt tested here, and the second most voted answer was unvectorized. Commented Oct 13, 2021 at 11:31
3

For those wanting arbitrarily sized squares/rectangles:

import numpy as np
# if you want X squares per axis, do squaresize=[i//X for i in boardsize]
def checkerboard(boardsize, squaresize):
    return np.fromfunction(lambda i, j: (i//squaresize[0])%2 != (j//squaresize[1])%2, boardsize).astype(int)

print(checkerboard((10,15), (2,3)))
[[0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1]
 [1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1]
 [1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0]]
3

Based on Eelco Hoogendoorn's answer, if you want a checkerboard with various tile sizes you can use this:

def checkerboard(shape, tile_size):
    return (np.indices(shape) // tile_size).sum(axis=0) % 2

1
  • 1
    Seems like the most elegant solution for variable tile size. Thanks
    – vozman
    Commented Jul 8, 2021 at 9:54
3

Can't you use hstack and vstack? See here. Like this:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> b = np.array([0]*4)
>>> b.shape = (2,2)
>>> w = b + 0xAA
>>> r1 = np.hstack((b,w,b,w,b,w,b))
>>> r2 = np.hstack((w,b,w,b,w,b,w))
>>> board = np.vstack((r1,r2,r1,r2,r1,r2,r1))
2
  • I don't get no respect here, but this is correct. telliott99.blogspot.com/2010/01/…
    – telliott99
    Commented Jan 30, 2010 at 23:54
  • This doesn't make an array of the correct size, though it looks like you expanded your answer in your blog post. But we can't vote up the blog post! :) Sheesh! Commented Jan 31, 2010 at 16:18
2
import numpy as np

a=np.array(([1,0]*4+[0,1]*4)*4).reshape((8,8))
print(a)


[[1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1]]
2

Replace n with an even number and you will get the answer.

import numpy as np
b = np.array([[0,1],[1,0]])
np.tile(b,(n, n))
1
  • short and simple
    – Kenan
    Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 1:09
2

Since numpy 1.20.0, we can use sliding_window_view method in its stride_tricks module. The idea is to view an array that looks like 0,1,0,1,0,1 with a moving window of size w. So to get a h x w checkerboard, we need an initial array of length h+w-1. Since this is a view, it uses very little memory (only the original array of length h+w-1 is read into memory).

def checkerboard(h, w):
    return np.lib.stride_tricks.sliding_window_view(np.arange(w+h-1) % 2, w)

checkerboard(4,4)           # a 4x4 checkerboard

array([[0, 1, 0, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 0]], dtype=int32)

This is also much faster than the other options on this page too. Adding this function into the perfplot construction in Nico's answer produces the following graph. As you can see, it has a greater overhead than the others but for larger sizes, it's much faster (used numpy 1.25.2 on Python 3.10.12).

perfplot

1

I modified hass's answer as follows.

import math
import numpy as np

def checkerboard(w, h, c0, c1, blocksize):
        tile = np.array([[c0,c1],[c1,c0]]).repeat(blocksize, axis=0).repeat(blocksize, axis=1)
        grid = np.tile(tile,(int(math.ceil((h+0.0)/(2*blocksize))),int(math.ceil((w+0.0)/(2*blocksize)))))
        return grid[:h,:w]
1
  • 4
    Ideally, you'd indicate what advantage this answer has over another, rather than just telling us you've modified it. Commented Nov 21, 2013 at 15:44
1

Using tile function :

import numpy as np
n = int(input())
x = np.tile(arr,(n,n//2))
x[1::2, 0::2] = 1
x[0::2, 1::2] = 1
print(x)
1

Very very late, but I needed a solution that allows for a non-unit checker size on an arbitrarily sized checkerboard. Here's a simple and fast solution:

import numpy as np

def checkerboard(shape, dw):
    """Create checkerboard pattern, each square having width ``dw``.

    Returns a numpy boolean array.
    """
    # Create individual block
    block = np.zeros((dw * 2, dw * 2), dtype=bool)
    block[dw:, :dw] = 1
    block[:dw, dw:] = 1

    # Tile until we exceed the size of the mask, then trim
    repeat = (np.array(shape) + dw * 2) // np.array(block.shape)
    trim = tuple(slice(None, s) for s in shape)
    checkers = np.tile(block, repeat)[trim]

    assert checkers.shape == shape
    return checkers

To convert the checkerboard squares to colors, you could do:

checkers = checkerboard(shape, dw)
img = np.empty_like(checkers, dtype=np.uint8)
img[checkers] = 0xAA
img[~checkers] = 0x99
1
import numpy as np
n = int(input())
arr = ([0, 1], [1,0])
print(np.tile(arr, (n//2,n//2)))

For input 6, output:

   [[0 1 0 1 0 1]
    [1 0 1 0 1 0]
    [0 1 0 1 0 1]
    [1 0 1 0 1 0]
    [0 1 0 1 0 1]
    [1 0 1 0 1 0]]
0

I recently want the same function and i modified doug's answer a little bit as follows:

def gen_checkerboard(grid_num, grid_size):
    row_even = grid_num/2 * [0,1]
    row_odd = grid_num/2 * [1,0]
    checkerboard = numpy.row_stack(grid_num/2*(row_even, row_odd))
    return checkerboard.repeat(grid_size, axis = 0).repeat(grid_size, axis = 1)
0

Simplest implementation of the same.

import numpy as np

n = int(input())
checkerboard = np.tile(np.array([[0,1],[1,0]]), (n//2, n//2))
print(checkerboard)
1
  • 1
    @demokritos You are missing the context. Commented Jan 15, 2021 at 9:16
0
n = int(input())
import numpy as np
m=int(n/2)
a=np.array(([0,1]*m+[1,0]*m)*m).reshape((n,n))

print (a)

So if input is n = 4 then output would be like:

[[0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0]]
0

Simplest way to write checkboard matrix using tile()

array = np.tile([0,1],n//2)
array1 = np.tile([1,0],n//2)
finalArray = np.array([array, array1], np.int32)
finalArray = np.tile(finalArray,(n//2,1))
0

Suppose we need a patter with length and breadth (even number) as l, b.

base_matrix = np.array([[0,1],[1,0]])

As this base matrix, which would be used as a tile already has length and breadth of 2 X 2, we would need to divide by 2.

print np.tile(base_matrix, (l / 2, b / 2))

print (np.tile(base,(4/2,6/2)))
[[0 1 0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 1 0 1 0 1]
 [1 0 1 0 1 0]]
0
n = int(input())
import numpy as np
a = np.array([0])
x = np.tile(a,(n,n))
x[1::2, ::2] = 1
x[::2, 1::2] = 1
print(x)

I guess this works perfectly well using numpy.tile( ) function.

0

Here is the solution using tile function in numpy.

import numpy as np

x = np.array([[0, 1], [1, 0]])
check = np.tile(x, (n//2, n//2))
# Print the created matrix
print(check)
  1. for input 2, the Output is
     [[0 1]
     [1 0]]
  1. for input 4, the Output is
     [[0 1 0 1] 
     [1 0 1 0]
     [0 1 0 1]
     [1 0 1 0]]
0

Given odd or even 'n', below approach generates "arr" in the checkerboard pattern and does not use loops. If n is odd, this is extremely straightforward to use. If n is even, we generate the checkerboard for n-1 and then add an extra row and column.

rows = n-1 if n%2 == 0 else n
arr=(rows*rows)//2*[0,1]
arr.extend([0])
arr = np.reshape(arr, (rows,rows))

if n%2 == 0:
    extra = (n//2*[1,0])
    arr = np.concatenate((arr, np.reshape(extra[:-1], (1,n-1))))
    arr = np.concatenate((arr, np.reshape(extra, (n,1))), 1)
0

Here is a generalisation to falko's answer

import numpy as np

def checkerboard(width,sq):
    '''
    width --> the checkerboard will be of size width x width
    sq ---> each square inside the checkerboard will be of size sq x sq
    '''
    rep = int(width/(2*sq))
    return np.kron([[1, 0] * rep, [0, 1] * rep] * rep, np.ones((sq, sq))).astype(np.uint8)

x = checkerboard(width=8,sq=4)
print(x)
print('checkerboard is of size ',x.shape)

which gives the following output

[[1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1]]
checkerboard is of size  (8, 8)
-1

Here's a numpy solution with some checking to make sure that the width and height are evenly divisible by the square size.

def make_checkerboard(w, h, sq, fore_color, back_color):
    """
    Creates a checkerboard pattern image
    :param w: The width of the image desired
    :param h: The height of the image desired
    :param sq: The size of the square for the checker pattern
    :param fore_color: The foreground color
    :param back_color: The background color
    :return:
    """
    w_rem = np.mod(w, sq)
    h_rem = np.mod(w, sq)
    if w_rem != 0 or h_rem != 0:
        raise ValueError('Width or height is not evenly divisible by square '
                         'size.')
    img = np.zeros((h, w, 3), dtype='uint8')
    x_divs = w // sq
    y_divs = h // sq
    fore_tile = np.ones((sq, sq, 3), dtype='uint8')
    fore_tile *= np.array([[fore_color]], dtype='uint8')
    back_tile = np.ones((sq, sq, 3), dtype='uint8')
    back_tile *= np.array([[back_color]], dtype='uint8')
    for y in np.arange(y_divs):
        if np.mod(y, 2):
            b = back_tile
            f = fore_tile
        else:
            b = fore_tile
            f = back_tile
        for x in np.arange(x_divs):
            if np.mod(x, 2) == 0:
                img[y * sq:y * sq + sq, x * sq:x * sq + sq] = f
            else:
                img[y * sq:y * sq + sq, x * sq:x * sq + sq] = b
    return img
0

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