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I'm using github for students to submit a programming assignment. And I have a strict deadline for submission and I would like to be able to check the time that their release was submitted.

Unfortunately, github only reports how many days ago a release or commit was made. Is there any (quick) way to get the exact time?

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If you move your mouse over the xx minutes|hours\... ago label, a tooltip will be displayed showing the UTC time the commit was created at.

Keep in mind that Git history can be rewritten (see git commit --amend or git filter-branch commands for instance) and that this displayed time shouldn't be considered as solid proof.

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  • 3
    Perfect! Good advice about the potential to re-write history. Thanks – Ken Feb 11 '14 at 13:57
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Well I'm jumping into this WAAAYY late, but I wanted to add a note about this particular use case.

nulltoken is absolutely right about the possibility of the times being modified. To circumvent this, I would make use of tags. Slap together a simple script that would pull the branch at the cutoff point, tag it (using an annotated tag), and then push the tag up to github. This gives you a snapshot of the branch at that particular time, stamped the time that the tag was cut AND the name of the tagger. That last part is particularly useful for students who think they are crafty.

https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Basics-Tagging

Cheers!

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  • Better late than never! I'm always open to good ideas... That actually might work! What happens if a student re-tags using the same tag? – Ken Jan 19 '17 at 22:52
  • Without testing it myself, I would expect the student's name to show up as the tagger (if they created an annotated tag) or the tagger's name to disappear (if they used a simple tag). That is worth playing around with though. I'm also not sure if it is possible to lock users out of pushing tags. – ProbablyJody Jan 19 '17 at 22:58

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