Given below is the code written for getting live stream from an IP Camera.

from cv2 import *
from cv2 import cv
import urllib
import numpy as np
k=0
capture=cv.CaptureFromFile("http://IPADDRESS of the camera/axis-cgi/mjpg/video.cgi")
namedWindow("Display",1)

while True:
    frame=cv.QueryFrame(capture)
    if frame is None:
        print 'Cam not found'
        break
    else:
        cv.ShowImage("Display", frame)
    if k==0x1b:
        print 'Esc. Exiting'
        break

On running the code the output that I am getting is:

Cam not found

Where am I going wrong? Also, why is frame None here? Is there some problem with the conversion?

  • Is that CGI script returning the video stream or a HTML page for browser display? – Andris Feb 11 '14 at 14:53
  • @Andris It returns a video stream, I have tried playing it using VLC and it works. – Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Feb 12 '14 at 3:27
  • I have no IP camera but others have fought with Axis cameras a lot in 2009. Apart from that "mjpg" at the end of the URL may help. – Andris Feb 12 '14 at 8:41
  • As I see you have tried different aproaches as well and fixed the mjpg already. :) One last guess is using gstreamer between OpenCV and the IP camera. – Andris Feb 12 '14 at 9:07
  • @Andris I saw that, see my comment on that answer. – Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Feb 12 '14 at 9:19
up vote 68 down vote accepted
+50
import cv2
import urllib 
import numpy as np

stream = urllib.urlopen('http://localhost:8080/frame.mjpg')
bytes = ''
while True:
    bytes += stream.read(1024)
    a = bytes.find('\xff\xd8')
    b = bytes.find('\xff\xd9')
    if a != -1 and b != -1:
        jpg = bytes[a:b+2]
        bytes = bytes[b+2:]
        i = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(jpg, dtype=np.uint8), cv2.CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR)
        cv2.imshow('i', i)
        if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
            exit(0)   

edit (explanation)

I just saw that you mention that you have c++ code that is working, if that is the case your camera may work in python as well. The code above manually parses the mjpeg stream without relying on opencv, since in some of my projects the url will not be opened by opencv no matter what I did(c++,python).

Mjpeg over http is multipart/x-mixed-replace with boundary frame info and jpeg data is just sent in binary. So you don't really need to care about http protocol headers. All jpeg frames start with marker 0xff 0xd8 and end with 0xff 0xd9. So the code above extracts such frames from the http stream and decodes them one by one. like below.

...(http)
0xff 0xd8      --|
[jpeg data]      |--this part is extracted and decoded
0xff 0xd9      --|
...(http)
0xff 0xd8      --|
[jpeg data]      |--this part is extracted and decoded
0xff 0xd9      --|
...(http)

edit 2 (reading from mjpg file)

Regarding your question of saving the file, yes the file can be directly saved and reopened using the same method with very small modification. For example you would do curl http://IPCAM > output.mjpg and then change the line stream=urllib.urlopen('http://localhost:8080/frame.mjpg')so that the code becomes this

import cv2
import urllib 
import numpy as np

stream = open('output.mjpg', 'rb')
bytes = ''
while True:
    bytes += stream.read(1024)
    a = bytes.find('\xff\xd8')
    b = bytes.find('\xff\xd9')
    if a != -1 and b != -1:
        jpg = bytes[a:b+2]
        bytes = bytes[b+2:]
        i = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(jpg, dtype=np.uint8), cv2.CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR)
        cv2.imshow('i', i)
        if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
            exit(0)   

Of course you are saving a lot of redundant http headers, which you might want to strip away. Or if you have extra cpu power, maybe just encode to h264 first. But if the camera is adding some meta data to http header frames such as channel, timestamp, etc. Then it may be useful to keep them.

edit 3 (tkinter interfacing)

import cv2
import urllib 
import numpy as np
import Tkinter
from PIL import Image, ImageTk
import threading

root = Tkinter.Tk()
image_label = Tkinter.Label(root)  
image_label.pack()

def cvloop():    
    stream=open('output.mjpg', 'rb')
    bytes = ''
    while True:
        bytes += stream.read(1024)
        a = bytes.find('\xff\xd8')
        b = bytes.find('\xff\xd9')
        if a != -1 and b != -1:
            jpg = bytes[a:b+2]
            bytes = bytes[b+2:]
            i = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(jpg, dtype=np.uint8), cv2.CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR)            
            tki = ImageTk.PhotoImage(Image.fromarray(cv2.cvtColor(i, cv2.COLOR_BGR2RGB)))
            image_label.configure(image=tki)                
            image_label._backbuffer_ = tki  #avoid flicker caused by premature gc
            cv2.imshow('i', i)
        if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
            exit(0)  

thread = threading.Thread(target=cvloop)
thread.start()
root.mainloop()
  • Can you explain the code too please? – Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Feb 18 '14 at 4:10
  • And what does bytes+=stream.read(16384) do? – Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Feb 18 '14 at 4:33
  • 2
    hmm...i got curious about how to do this as well. i have edited the answer. i know you got it solved in another question, but i think this method is better because the gui is going to hang in io errors etc in that answer. – Zaw Lin Feb 27 '14 at 8:00
  • 3
    Geez! you are the computer hacker! – Yuda Prawira Mar 30 '14 at 13:18
  • 1
    Any chance you could port this to Python 3? Strings and bytes and all that make this broken and I was unable to adapt it myself. – bugmenot123 Apr 16 '16 at 8:50

First of all, please be aware that you should first try simply using OpenCV's video capture functions directly, e.g. cv2.VideoCapture('http://localhost:8080/frame.mjpg')!

This works just fine for me:

import cv2
cap = cv2.VideoCapture('http://localhost:8080/frame.mjpg')

while True:
  ret, frame = cap.read()
  cv2.imshow('Video', frame)

  if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
    exit(0)

Anyways, here is Zaw Lin's solution ported to OpenCV 3 (only change is cv2.CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR to cv2.IMREAD_COLOR and Python 3 (string vs byte handling changed plus urllib):

import cv2
import urllib.request
import numpy as np

stream = urllib.request.urlopen('http://localhost:8080/frame.mjpg')
bytes = bytes()
while True:
    bytes += stream.read(1024)
    a = bytes.find(b'\xff\xd8')
    b = bytes.find(b'\xff\xd9')
    if a != -1 and b != -1:
        jpg = bytes[a:b+2]
        bytes = bytes[b+2:]
        i = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(jpg, dtype=np.uint8), cv2.IMREAD_COLOR)
        cv2.imshow('i', i)
        if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
            exit(0)
  • 1
    If you're trying to adapt the accepted answer to use python3's urllib, beware of changing the bytes.find('...') to bytes.find(b'...') - basically remember to specify that we're looking for byte! Otherwise won't work – MMagician Oct 19 '17 at 9:52
  • I get following error bytes = bytes() TypeError: 'str' object is not callable – Sade Oct 13 at 11:09
  • @Sade I cannot reproduce that statement raising a TypeError in neither 2.7.15 nor 3.7.0. – bugmenot123 Oct 15 at 8:59
  • Thanks for trying I used cap = cv2.VideoCapture('http:/5102.54/video/mjpeg/stream2') and it works. – Sade Oct 15 at 11:46

Here is an answer using the Python 3 requests module instead of urllib.

The reason for not using urllib is that it cannot correctly interpret a URL like http://user:pass@ipaddress:port

Adding authentication parameters is more complex in urllib than the requests module.

Here is a nice, concise solution using the requests module:

import cv2
import requests
import numpy as np

r = requests.get('http://192.168.1.xx/mjpeg.cgi', auth=('user', 'password'), stream=True)
if(r.status_code == 200):
    bytes = bytes()
    for chunk in r.iter_content(chunk_size=1024):
        bytes += chunk
        a = bytes.find(b'\xff\xd8')
        b = bytes.find(b'\xff\xd9')
        if a != -1 and b != -1:
            jpg = bytes[a:b+2]
            bytes = bytes[b+2:]
            i = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(jpg, dtype=np.uint8), cv2.IMREAD_COLOR)
            cv2.imshow('i', i)
            if cv2.waitKey(1) == 27:
                exit(0)
else:
    print("Received unexpected status code {}".format(r.status_code))
  • Varun, thanks for the answer. I am wondering if you'd know a way to use the same generator, that requests provides but somehow "return" that decoded image? Or to put it in other words, extract it outside of this part of code? I asked another answer but I don't expect it to get enough attention (stackoverflow.com/questions/44157160/…). – m3h0w May 25 '17 at 6:35
  • 1
    Defining a variable with name bytes will shadow the builtin bytes which is a type in Python 3. Better use another name. – isarandi May 13 at 17:42

I had the same problem. The solution without requests or urllib: just add the user and password in the cam address, using VideoCapture, like this:

E.g.

cv2.VideoCapture('http://user:password@XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/video')

using IPWebcam for android.

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