6

I have a data frame that looks something like this (with a lot more observations)

df <- structure(list(session_user_id = c("1803f6c3625c397afb4619804861f75268dfc567", 
"1924cb2ebdf29f052187b9a2d21673e4d314199b", "1924cb2ebdf29f052187b9a2d21673e4d314199b", 
"1924cb2ebdf29f052187b9a2d21673e4d314199b", "1924cb2ebdf29f052187b9a2d21673e4d314199b", 
"198b83b365fef0ed637576fe1bde786fc09817b2", "19fd8069c094fb0697508cc9646513596bea30c4", 
"19fd8069c094fb0697508cc9646513596bea30c4", "19fd8069c094fb0697508cc9646513596bea30c4", 
"19fd8069c094fb0697508cc9646513596bea30c4", "1a3d33c9cbb2aa41515e6ef76f123b2ea8ee2f13", 
"1b64c142b1540c43e3f813ccec09cb2dd7907c14", "1b7346d13f714c97725ba2e1c21b600535164291"
), raw_score = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0.2, NA, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0.2, 1), 
    submission_time = c(1389707078L, 1389694184L, 1389694188L, 
    1389694189L, 1389694194L, 1390115495L, 1389696939L, 1389696971L, 
    1389741306L, 1389985033L, 1389983862L, 1389854836L, 1389692240L
    )), .Names = c("session_user_id", "raw_score", "submission_time"
), row.names = 28:40, class = "data.frame")

I want to create a new data frame with only one observation per "session_ user_id" by keeping the one with the latest "submission_time."

The only idea that I have in mind is to create a list of unique users. Write a loop to find the max of submission_time for each user and then write a loop that gets raw score fore that user and time.

Can somebody show me a better way of doing this in R?

Thanks!

11

You could first order your data.frame by submission_time and remove all duplicated session_user_id entries afterwards:

## order by submission_time
df <- df[order(df$submission_time, decreasing=TRUE),]

## remove duplicated user_id
df <- df[!duplicated(df$session_user_id),]

#                            session_user_id raw_score submission_time
#33 198b83b365fef0ed637576fe1bde786fc09817b2       0.2      1390115495
#37 19fd8069c094fb0697508cc9646513596bea30c4       1.0      1389985033
#38 1a3d33c9cbb2aa41515e6ef76f123b2ea8ee2f13       1.0      1389983862
#39 1b64c142b1540c43e3f813ccec09cb2dd7907c14       0.2      1389854836
#28 1803f6c3625c397afb4619804861f75268dfc567       1.0      1389707078
#32 1924cb2ebdf29f052187b9a2d21673e4d314199b       1.0      1389694194
#40 1b7346d13f714c97725ba2e1c21b600535164291       1.0      1389692240
| improve this answer | |
6

This is simple to express with dplyr: first group by session id, then filter, selecting the row in each group with the maximum time:

library(dplyr)
df %.%
  group_by(session_user_id) %.%
  filter(submission_time == max(submission_time))

Alternatively, if you don't want to keep all maximum times (if duplicated), you could do:

library(dplyr)
df %.%
  group_by(session_user_id) %.%
  filter(row_number(desc(submission_time)) == 1)
| improve this answer | |
  • The second one picks out the earliest time, since the raw data is sorted in increasing chronological order – James Feb 11 '14 at 14:24
  • @James oops, fixed. But the order of the raw data won't affect either operation. – hadley Feb 11 '14 at 14:32
4

I'll add a data.table solution as well, and out of curiosity benchmark against dplyr on bigger data:

require(data.table)
DT <- as.data.table(df)
DT[DT[, .I[which.max(submission_time)], by=list(session_user_id)]$V1]

Here I'm assuming that the OP needs just one observation, even for multiple identical "max" values. If not, check out the function f2 below.


Benchmarks on bigger data vs dplyr:

Benchmark against @hadley's dplyr solutions on bigger data. I'll assume there are about 50e3 user ids and there are a total of 1e7 rows.

require(data.table)  # 1.8.11 commit 1142
require(dplyr)       # latest commit from github
set.seed(45L)
DT <- data.table(session_user_id = sample(paste0("id", 1:5e4), 1e7, TRUE), 
                 raw_score = sample(10, 1e7, TRUE), 
                 submission_time = sample(1e5:5e5, 1e7, TRUE))

DF <- tbl_df(as.data.frame(DT))

f1 <- function(DT) {
    DT[DT[, .I[which.max(submission_time)], by=list(session_user_id)]$V1]
}

f2 <- function(DT) {
    DT[DT[, .I[submission_time == max(submission_time)], 
            by=list(session_user_id)]$V1]
}

f3 <- function(DF) {
    DF %.%
        group_by(session_user_id) %.%
        filter(submission_time == max(submission_time))
}

f4 <- function(DF) {
    DF %.%
      group_by(session_user_id) %.%
      filter(row_number(desc(submission_time)) == 1)
}

And here are the timings. All are minimum of three runs:

system.time(a1 <- f1(DT)) 
#   user  system elapsed
#  1.044   0.056   1.101

system.time(a2 <- f2(DT)) 
#   user  system elapsed
#  1.384   0.080   1.475

system.time(a3 <- f3(DF)) 
#   user  system elapsed
#  4.513   0.044   4.555

system.time(a4 <- f4(DF)) 
#   user  system elapsed
#  6.312   0.004   6.314

As expected f4 is the slowest because it uses desc (which I'm guessing somehow involves in an ordering or sorting per group - a more computationally expensive operation than just getting max or which.max).

Here, a1 and a4 (only one observation even if multiple max values are present) give identical results and so does a2 and a3 (all max values).

data.table is at least 3x faster here (comparing a2 to a3) and about 5.7x times faster when comparing f1 to f4.

| improve this answer | |
  • I get better timings for the dplyr functions (1.8, and 2.6 for f3 and f4) but I'm also using the CRAN version, same for data.table (which I'm getting slightly slower times from). What's your rig like? I'm running a i7-3930k. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 11 '14 at 16:15
  • It's hard to compare 1.8 and 2.6 without data.table timings (from 1.8.11 commit 1142). I'm guessing the 1.101 and 1.475 will also be much faster on yours. So, it evens out. – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 16:21
  • It was the opposite actually. That's why I was wondering what kind of machine you have. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 11 '14 at 16:23
  • I've tested it on a mac with 10.9 and on a linux machine (Debian Linux 3.2.0-4-amd64 x86_64). Which version of data.table are you using? – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 16:24
  • As I mentioned, there are quite a few (silly) bugs during aggregation that were fixed recently. So, it's imperative to check the timings on 1.8.11 commit >= 1142. – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 16:30
2

You could use the "plyr' package to summarize the data. Something like this should work

max_subs<-ddply(df,"session_user_id",summarize,max_sub=max(submission_time))

ddply takes a data frame in and returns a data frame, and this will give you the user and submission times you want.

To return the original data frame rows corresponding to these you could do

df2<-df[df$session_user_id %in% max_subs$session_user_id & df$submission_time %in% max_subs$max_sub,]
| improve this answer | |
  • I wonder how fast this would be in comparison to a typical sort and dedup like sgibbs answer. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 11 '14 at 14:19
2

First find the max submission time by session_user_id. This table will be unique by session_user_id.

Then just merge (sql-speak: inner join) back to your original table joining on submission_time & session_user_id (R automatically picks up common names across the two data frames).

maxSessions<-aggregate(submission_time~session_user_id , df, max)
mySubset<-merge(df, maxSessions)
mySubset #this table has the data your are looking for

If you are looking for speed and your dataset is large then have a look at this How to summarize data by group in R? data.table & plyr are good choices.

| improve this answer | |
1

This is just an extended comment because I was interested in how fast each of the solutions were

library(microbenchmark)
library(plyr)
library(dplyr)
library(data.table)

df <- df[sample(1:nrow(df),10000,replace=TRUE),] # 10k records

fun.test1 <- function(df) {
  df <- df[order(df$submission_time, decreasing = TRUE),]
  df <- df[!duplicated(df$session_user_id),]
  return(df)
}

fun.test2 <- function(df) { 
  max_subs<-ddply(df,"session_user_id",summarize,max_sub=max(submission_time))
  df2<-df[df$session_user_id %in% max_subs$session_user_id & 
          df$submission_time %in% max_subs$max_sub,]
  return(df2)
}

fun.test3 <- function(df) {
  df <- df %.%
    group_by(session_user_id) %.%
    filter(submission_time == max(submission_time))
  return(df)
}

fun.test4 <- function(df) {
  maxSessions<-aggregate(submission_time~session_user_id , df, max)
  mySubset<-merge(df, maxSessions)
  return(mySubset)
}

fun.test5 <- function(df) { 
  df <- df[df$submission_time %in% by(df, df$session_user_id,
           function(x) max(x$submission_time)),]
  return(df)
}

dt <- as.data.table(df) # Assuming you're working with data.table to begin with
# Don't know a lot about data.table so I'm sure there's a faster solution
fun.test6 <- function(dt) { 
  dt <- unique(
    dt[,
       list(raw_score,submission_time=max(submission_time)),
       by=session_user_id]
    )
  return(dt)
}

Looks like the most basic solution with !duplicated() wins by a significant margin for small data (Under 1k), followed by dplyr. dplyr wins for large samples (over 1k).

microbenchmark(
 fun.test1(df),
 fun.test2(df),
 fun.test3(df),
 fun.test4(df),
 fun.test5(df),
 fun.test6(dt)
)

         expr        min          lq     median         uq        max neval
 fun.test1(df)   2476.712   2660.0805   2740.083   2832.588   9162.339   100
 fun.test2(df)   5847.393   6215.1420   6335.932   6477.745  12499.775   100
 fun.test3(df)    815.886    924.1405   1003.585   1050.169   1128.915   100
 fun.test4(df) 161822.674 167238.5165 172712.746 173254.052 225317.480   100
 fun.test5(df)   5611.329   5899.8085   6000.555   6120.123  57572.615   100
 fun.test6(dt) 511481.105 541534.7175 553155.852 578643.172 627739.674   100
| improve this answer | |
  • Is there a data.table solution here or you just loaded it out of habit ;)? And please, bigger data :). – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 15:28
  • haha, fun.test6 was "my" data.table solution, but as I commented, I'm sure there's a faster way to do it. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 11 '14 at 15:29
  • Oh damn, I dint think of scrolling down.. sorry about that. Will check. – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 15:31
  • Reran with 10k records, for sure there's a faster way with data.table, enlighten me Arun. – Brandon Bertelsen Feb 11 '14 at 15:45
  • 1
    Brandon, I've added an answer and benchmarks with dplyr. You may run that code and recheck the timings (but it has to be >=1142 commit from 1.8.11, quite a few bug fixes and optimisations there). – Arun Feb 11 '14 at 16:00

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