27

How do threads that rely on one another communicate in Java?

For example, I am building a web crawler with threads that need data that comes from other threads.

23

That depends on the nature of the communication.

  • Is it duplex (ie A talks to B and B talks to A)?
  • Is it communication of data or communication of completion?

and so on.

The simplest and most advisable form of inter-thread communication is simply to wait for the completion of other threads. That's most easily done by using Future:

ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(50);
final Future f = exec.submit(task1);
exec.submit(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        f.get();
        // do stuff
    }
});

The second task won't execute until the first completes.

Java 5+ has many concurrent utilities for dealing with this kind of thing. This could mean using LinkedBlockingQueues, CountDownLatch or many, many others.

For an in-depth examination of concurrency Java Concurrency in Practice is a must-read.

  • The threads don't go both ways, one thread waits for the result of another but not vice versa. Admittedly I'm a bit intimidated by the use of ExecutorService and Future, as I've never heard of them before. Is there another method of interthread communication not using Future and ExecutorService? – tipu Jan 31 '10 at 4:50
  • 1
    There's no need to be intimidated by ExecutorService and Future. They are reasonably simple and should take less than 2 hours to learn. Using Futures is easier than the standard queue classes, and a lot easier than rolling your own queue classes using wait() and notify(). – finnw Jan 31 '10 at 5:04
  • @cletus, -1 for calling Future.get() from within a task in a fixed thread pool. The danger there should be obvious. – finnw Jan 31 '10 at 5:08
  • @finnw: of course theres a danger but in the absence of the requirements for the communication or a better description you can't possibly suggest a method without danger. – cletus Jan 31 '10 at 5:16
  • This particular danger can be rectified by using a cached thread pool. – finnw Jan 31 '10 at 5:49
28

Below is example for Inter thread communication:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Chat m = new Chat();
        new T1(m);
        new T2(m);
    }
}

class Chat {
    boolean flag = false;

    public synchronized void FromSam(String msg) {
        if (flag) {
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        System.out.println(msg);
        flag = true;
        notify();
    }

    public synchronized void FromJam(String msg) {
        if (!flag) {
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        System.out.println(msg);
        flag = false;
        notify();
    }
}

class T1 implements Runnable {
    Chat m;
    String[] s1 = { "Hello Jam", "How are you ?", "I am also doing fine!" };

    public T1(Chat m1) {
        this.m = m1;
        new Thread(this, "Sam").start();
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < s1.length; i++) {
            m.FromSam(s1[i]);
        }
    }
}

class T2 implements Runnable {
    Chat m;
    String[] s2 = { "HI Sam", "I am good,And U ?", "ha haa" };

    public T2(Chat m2) {
        this.m = m2;
        new Thread(this, "Jam").start();
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < s2.length; i++) {
            m.FromJam(s2[i]);
        }
    }
}
2

Take a look at java.util.Observer/java.util.Observable. They are exactly what you are looking for.

0

You could use 2 ExecutorServices, submit a Callable implementation to service A that knows about follow on service B. When the Callable has completed it's work, it submits a new task to service B that does something additional with the results.

You could use a CountDownLatch or some other barrier if you need to perform additional work once all items have been processed in both services.

The ExecutorService api is pretty straight forward, for the most part you'll probably be using something like .newFixedThreadPool(int threads) and submitting Runnables/Callables to it.

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