5

I've discovered a surprising behaviour by apply that I wonder if anyone can explain. Lets take a simple matrix:

> (m = matrix(1:8,ncol=4))
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    3    5    7
[2,]    2    4    6    8

We can flip it vertically thus:

> apply(m, MARGIN=2, rev)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    4    6    8
[2,]    1    3    5    7

This applies the rev() vector reversal function iteratively to each column. But when we try to apply rev by row we get:

> apply(m, MARGIN=1, rev)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    7    8
[2,]    5    6
[3,]    3    4
[4,]    1    2

.. a 90 degree anti-clockwise rotation! Apply delivers the same result using FUN=function(v) {v[length(v):1]} so it is definitely not rev's fault.

Any explanation for this?

2

The documentation states that

If each call to FUN returns a vector of length n, then apply returns an array of dimension c(n, dim(X)[MARGIN]) if n > 1.

From that perspective, this behaviour is not a bug whatsoever, that's how it intended to work.

One may wonder why this is chosen to be a default setting, instead of preserving the structure of the original matrix. Consider the following example:

> apply(m, 1, quantile)
     [,1] [,2]
0%    1.0  2.0
25%   2.5  3.5
50%   4.0  5.0
75%   5.5  6.5
100%  7.0  8.0

> apply(m, 2, quantile)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
0%   1.00 3.00 5.00 7.00
25%  1.25 3.25 5.25 7.25
50%  1.50 3.50 5.50 7.50
75%  1.75 3.75 5.75 7.75
100% 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00

> all(rownames(apply(m, 2, quantile)) == rownames(apply(m, 1, quantile)))
[1] TRUE

Consistent? Indeed, why would we expect anything else?

  • Thanks for explaining both the mechanics and reason. Unless subsequent consensus goes towards Matthew's (seemingly equally correct) answer I think you've nailed it. – geotheory Feb 12 '14 at 15:18
  • Thanks for the comment, appreciate it. – tonytonov Feb 12 '14 at 16:08
4

This is because apply returns a matrix that is defined column-wise, and you're iterating over the rows.

The first application of apply presents each row, which is then a column in the result.

Presenting the function print shows what's being passed to rev at each iteration:

 x <- apply(m, 1, print)
[1] 1 3 5 7
[1] 2 4 6 8

That is, each call to print is passed a vector. Two calls, and c(1,3,5,7) and c(2,4,6,8) are being passed to the function.

Reversing these gives c(7,5,3,1) and c(8,6,4,2), then these are used as the columns of the return matrix, giving the result that you see.

  • Thanks Matthew I think you're spot on, but I think the answer belongs to tonytonov for articulating in terms of the documentation and illustrating the underlying philosophy. Incidentally the print thing was illuminating: apply(m, 1, FUN=function(v){print("done")}) (confusingly) yields both printed and object reports which is something to bear in mind :) – geotheory Feb 12 '14 at 15:15
  • @geotheory That's why I assigned the result to a variable. This prevents printing the returned object. In the case of experimenting with print, we only care about the arguments and not the returned value. Wrapping the expression in invisible() also prevents printing the final result, but assigning to a variable is fewer keystrokes. – Matthew Lundberg Feb 12 '14 at 15:20
2

When you pass a row vector to rev, it returns a column vector.

t(c(1,2,3,4))

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    4

rev(t(c(1,2,3,4)))
[1] 4 3 2 1

which is not what you expected

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    4    3    2    1

So, you'll have to transpose the call to apply to get what you want

 t(apply(m, MARGIN=1, rev))
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    7    5    3    1
[2,]    8    6    4    2
  • I see t forces a matrix orientation, but can vec itself be said to return a vertical or horizontal orientation? identical(1:10, rev(t(10:1))) is TRUE. – geotheory Feb 12 '14 at 15:10
  • Perhaps more clearly, identical(rev(t(t(1:10))), rev(t(1:10))) is TRUE.. – geotheory Feb 12 '14 at 15:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.