What is the size of character in C and C++ ? As far as I know the size of char is 1 byte in both C and C++.

In C:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  printf("Size of char : %d\n",sizeof(char));
  return 0;
}

In C++:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  std::cout<<"Size of char : "<<sizeof(char)<<"\n";
  return 0;
}

No surprises, both of them gives the output : Size of char : 1

Now we know that characters are represented as 'a','b','c','|',... So I just modified the above codes to these:

In C:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  char a = 'a';
  printf("Size of char : %d\n",sizeof(a));
  printf("Size of char : %d\n",sizeof('a'));
  return 0;
}

Output:

Size of char : 1
Size of char : 4

In C++:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  char a = 'a';
  std::cout<<"Size of char : "<<sizeof(a)<<"\n";
  std::cout<<"Size of char : "<<sizeof('a')<<"\n";
  return 0;
}

Output:

Size of char : 1
Size of char : 1

Why the sizeof('a') returns different values in C and C++?

  • 7
    The "%|" format requires an int argument (or something that promotes to int). sizeof yields a result of type size_t. Either convert to int using a cast or, if your implementation supports it, use "%zu". – Keith Thompson Nov 9 '11 at 19:55
up vote 303 down vote accepted

In C, the type of a character constant like 'a' is actually an int, with size of 4 (or some other implementation-dependent value). In C++, the type is char, with size of 1. This is one of many small differences between the two languages.

  • 12
    In the C++ Standard it's section 2.13.2/1, in C 6.4.4.4, at least in the doc I've got. – anon Jan 31 '10 at 19:24
  • 14
    +1 (Except that, while the "size of 4" obviously applies to nthrgeek's platform, it doesn't necessarily apply to all platforms.) – sbi Jan 31 '10 at 19:24
  • 27
    @nthrgeek: I'm too lazy to quote both standards, but the C++ standard has an appendix dedicated to incompatibilities with C. Under Appendix C.1.1, it mentions that "Type of character literal is changed from int to char, which explains the behavior. :) – jalf Jan 31 '10 at 19:28
  • 2
    @nthrgeek: §6.4.4.4, paragraph 10: "An integer character constant has type int. The value of an integer character constant containing a single character that maps to a single-byte execution character is the numerical value of the representation of the mapped character interpreted as an integer." – Stephen Canon Jan 31 '10 at 19:41
  • 6
    @nthrgeek: You should not be asking for a standard reference unless you are having an argument about a specific point and you want to understand why the other person has a different opinion. If everybody agrees just accept it. You (as a developer) should be quite intelligent enough to quickly find common answer like this all by yourself. – Martin York Feb 1 '10 at 5:07

As Paul stated, it's because 'a' is an int in C but a char in C++.

I cover that specific difference between C and C++ in something I wrote a few years ago, at: http://david.tribble.com/text/cdiffs.htm

  • 4
    Just curious, but are you working on updating that (very detailed) doc to include the new changes in C++11 and C11? – Adam Rosenfield Aug 13 '12 at 20:15
  • Not at the moment. My interest in C and C++ has waned a lot in the last five years or so. – David R Tribble Aug 20 '12 at 19:34
  • 2
    Uh, I used your work to write this and here you are on SO. Such a small world! – user405725 Dec 9 '13 at 18:04

In C the type of character literals are int and char in C++. This is in C++ required to support function overloading. See this example:

void foo(char c)
{
    puts("char");
}
void foo(int i)
{
    puts("int");
}
int main()
{
    foo('i');
    return 0;
}

Output:

char

In C language, character literal is not a char type. C considers character literal as integer. So, there is no difference between sizeof('a') and sizeof(1).

So, the sizeof character literal is equal to sizeof integer in C.

In C++ language, character literal is type of char. The cppreference say's:

1) narrow character literal or ordinary character literal, e.g. 'a' or '\n' or '\13'. Such literal has type char and the value equal to the representation of c-char in the execution character set. If c-char is not representable as a single byte in the execution character set, the literal has type int and implementation-defined value.

So, in C++ character literal is a type of char. so, size of character literal in C++ is one byte.

Alos, In your programs, you have used wrong format specifier for sizeof operator.

C11 §7.21.6.1 (P9) :

If a conversion specification is invalid, the behavior is undefined.275) If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion specification, the behavior is undefined.

So, you should use %zu format specifier instead of %d, otherwise it is undefined behaviour in C.

  • %zu is not supported on many platforms, but better portability, use (int)sizeof(char) and format %d – chqrlie Nov 1 '17 at 11:16
  • The value of character literals is not necessarily the corresponding ASCII code. It depends on the source and execution character sets and whether the char type is signed or unsigned by default. – chqrlie Nov 1 '17 at 11:18

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