1

This question already has an answer here:

I created one new class which is publicly inherited from the string class. I wish to overload the < (less than) operator in the derived class. But from the overloaded function I need to call the parent class < operator. What is the syntax for calling this function? I would like to implement the operator as a member function if possible.

In Java there is super keyword for this.

My code is given below.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;    
class mystring:public string
    {
     bool operator<(const mystring ms)
     {
      //some stmt;
      //some stmt;
      //call the overloaded <( less than )operator in the string class and return the value
      }

    };

marked as duplicate by meagar, marcinj, lpapp, Aurelius, Kerrek SB Mar 5 '14 at 22:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Is string std::string? – Joseph Mansfield Feb 12 '14 at 14:16
  • yes std::string – Able Johnson Feb 12 '14 at 14:17
  • Thank you for the link.I need the syntax for calling the less than operator in the parent class. – Able Johnson Feb 12 '14 at 14:35
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std::string doesn't have a member overload of operator<, there is a free function template for operator< that operates on std::string. You should consider making your operator< a free function to. To call the operator< that operates on std::string, you can use references.

E.g.:

const std::string& left = *this;
const std::string& right = ms;
return left < right;
  • Thank you very much! This one works perfectly. Could you please answer one more doubt.If it is a free function template ,by default It should work for mystring also.But compiler gives error when I delete the operator < function from mystr. – Able Johnson Feb 12 '14 at 14:47
  • @AbleJohnson: What error does the compiler give and what does the code that gives this error actually look like? – CB Bailey Feb 12 '14 at 15:07
  • #include<iostream> #include<string> using namespace std; class mystring:public string { }; int main() { mystring a,b; cout<<a<b; return(0); } This is my code.The compiler gives a very long page of error – Able Johnson Feb 12 '14 at 15:16
  • @AbleJohnson: You probably meant cout<<(a<b); (<< binds more tightly than <) but telling me that the error was long still doesn't give me any clue as to its contents. – CB Bailey Feb 12 '14 at 16:52
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Calling a base class operawtor is easy if you realize that it is just a function with a funny name:

bool operator<(const mystring ms)
{
  //some stmt;
  //some stmt;
  return string::operator<(ms);
}

Alas, that does not work with std::string because operator< is not a member function, but a free function. Something like:

namespace std
{
    bool operator<(const string &a, const string &b);
}

The rationale is the same, call the funny named function:

bool operator<(const mystring ms)
{
  //some stmt;
  //some stmt;
  operator<(*this, ms);
}
  • std::string doesn't have a member operator<. – CB Bailey Feb 12 '14 at 14:28
  • I tried that error: ‘operator<’ is not a member of ‘std::string {aka std::basic_string<char>}’ – Able Johnson Feb 12 '14 at 14:32
  • Ops! You are right, it is a free function! not a member one! Correcting the answer... – rodrigo Feb 12 '14 at 14:39

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