48

Let's say I need to split string like this:

Input string: "My. name. is Bond._James Bond!" Output 2 strings:

  1. "My. name. is Bond"
  2. "_James Bond!"

I tried this:

int lastDotIndex = inputString.LastIndexOf(".", System.StringComparison.Ordinal);
string firstPart = inputString.Remove(lastDotIndex);
string secondPart= inputString.Substring(lastDotIndex + 1, inputString.Length - firstPart.Length - 1);

Can someone propose more elegant way?

  • I'd say that underscore is exactly there for you to split on. Split on that symbol and perhaps add it manually again if you really need it for the 2nd part of the output. – Jeroen Vannevel Feb 12 '14 at 16:31
  • 1
    Not clear how do you want to treat the underscore. It is always present? Should be removed from the output, do you need to keep it? – Steve Feb 12 '14 at 16:34
114
string s = "My. name. is Bond._James Bond!";
int idx = s.LastIndexOf('.');

if (idx != -1)
{
    Console.WriteLine(s.Substring(0, idx)); // "My. name. is Bond"
    Console.WriteLine(s.Substring(idx + 1)); // "_James Bond!"
}
  • 1
    bonus - this doesn't blow up if idx == -1, i.e. there is no '.' – CAD bloke Jul 11 '17 at 10:58
  • @CADbloke Huh? I believe it does! – Ahmed Abdelhameed Feb 8 '18 at 18:32
  • if it doesn't find "." then idx == -1, you add one (last line), that's zero, the start of the string (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aka44szs(v=vs.110).aspx). It will return the whole string if there is not ".". – CAD bloke Feb 8 '18 at 20:10
  • 2
    True, however s.Substring(0, idx) when idx = -1 will throw an exception. I'll edit the answer to include an if statement to make this clear. – Phil K Feb 9 '18 at 10:44
14

You can also use a little bit of LINQ. The first part is a little verbose, but the last part is pretty concise :

string input = "My. name. is Bond._James Bond!";

string[] split = input.Split('.');
string firstPart = string.Join(".", split.Take(split.Length - 1)); //My. name. is Bond
string lastPart = split.Last(); //_James Bond!
9
string[] theSplit = inputString.Split('_'); // split at underscore
string firstPart = theSplit[0]; // get the first part
string secondPart = "_" + theSplit[1]; // get the second part and concatenate the underscore to at the front

EDIT: Following from the comments; this only works if you have one instance of the underscore character in your input string.

  • 7
    Worth noting --- This only works correctly if the string has a single occurrence of the letter. Which this is true in the example, it may not be true when the OP uses this in actual practice. – drew_w Feb 12 '14 at 16:34
  • Just supply number of splits like string[] theSplit = inputString.Split(new char[] { '_' }, 2); – Peter Ivan Feb 20 '17 at 12:55
3
  1. Assuming you only want the split character to appear on the second and greater split strings...
  2. Assuming you want to ignore duplicate split characters...
  3. More curly braces... check...
  4. More elegant... maybe...
  5. More fun... Heck yeah!!

    var s = "My. name. is Bond._James Bond!";
    var firstSplit = true;
    var splitChar = '_';
    var splitStrings = s.Split(new[] { splitChar }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
        .Select(x =>
        {
            if (!firstSplit)
            {
                return splitChar + x;
            }
            firstSplit = false;
            return x;
        });
    

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