467

In a React component for a <select> menu, I need to set the selected attribute on the option that reflects the application state.

In render(), the optionState is passed from the state owner to the SortMenu component. The option values are passed in as props from JSON.

render: function() {
  var options = [],
      optionState = this.props.optionState;

  this.props.options.forEach(function(option) {
    var selected = (optionState === option.value) ? ' selected' : '';

    options.push(
      <option value={option.value}{selected}>{option.label}</option>
    );
  });

// pass {options} to the select menu jsx

However that triggers a syntax error on JSX compilation.

Doing this gets rid of the syntax error but obviously doesn't solve the problem:

var selected = (optionState === option.value) ? 'selected' : 'false';

<option value={option.value} selected={selected}>{option.label}</option>

I also tried this:

var selected = (optionState === option.value) ? true : false;

<option value={option.value} {selected ? 'selected' : ''}>{option.label}</option>

Is there a recommended way of solving this?

1
  • 32
    Upvoting the question just for the title – ericgio Jun 10 '20 at 20:06

13 Answers 13

733

React makes this even easier for you. Instead of defining selected on each option, you can (and should) simply write value={optionsState} on the select tag itself:

<select value={optionsState}>
  <option value="A">Apple</option>
  <option value="B">Banana</option>
  <option value="C">Cranberry</option>
</select>

For more info, see the React select tag doc.

Also, React automatically understands booleans for this purpose, so you can simply write (note: not recommended)

<option value={option.value} selected={optionsState == option.value}>{option.label}</option>

and it will output 'selected' appropriately.

12
  • 57
    With the current version of React (0.9) setting the selected attribute on options does not work at all. Set the value attribute on the select element instead. – liammclennan Feb 23 '14 at 3:33
  • 2
    i load data with ajax.defaultValue is not working for me. value is working but i cant select another item on select list.List is opening but when i select one of them it select value item.Any idea ? – user1924375 May 2 '15 at 17:59
  • 5
    @user1924375 you should use onChange event onChange={this.handleSelect} and set state value for your component, for example: 'handleSelect: function() { this.setState({value: event.target.value});}` This would rerender your select component with new selected item. Hope it would help you. – funnydaredevil Jun 11 '15 at 16:49
  • 7
    Rather use defaultValue to initialize – dewwwald Oct 4 '17 at 17:19
  • 2
    Try to use defaultValue on <select>, but note: when the <select> is rendered, the <options> must already be available or else it won't work. If you async-load the options after rendering the <select>, then you may have to use selected={condition} on the <option> to get it to work. Alternatively, render some other control like a Spinner until all the values are available. – user3523091 Apr 3 '20 at 1:14
77

You could do what React warns you when you try to set the "selected" property of the <option>:

Use the defaultValue or value props on <select> instead of setting selected on <option>.

So, you can use options.value on the defaultValue of your select

4
  • 9
    If I want to still indicate the option that is currently selected, how would I do this though? The only way I am currently able to actually keep the option selected (and keep the form's state for future POSTing) is by setting select=true. I have tried setting the defaultValue and value props of the select element, but this does not render in the view by setting the correct option to selected in the option menu. Any advice? – The Pied Pipes Apr 23 '15 at 21:35
  • 6
    Example maybe?? – shinzou Jun 11 '18 at 13:07
  • 1
    Not working for me : <select className="form-control" value="Mois"> – Kuartz Jun 7 '19 at 8:47
  • Me neither @Kuartz – user13962354 Aug 27 '20 at 14:35
25

Here is a complete solution which incorporates the best answer and the comments below it (which might help someone struggling to piece it all together):

UPDATE FOR ES6 (2019) - using arrow functions and object destructuring

in main component:

class ReactMain extends React.Component {

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = { fruit: props.item.fruit };
  }

  handleChange = (event) => {
    this.setState({ [event.target.name]: event.target.value });
  }

  saveItem = () => {
    const item = {};
    item.fruit = this.state.fruit;
    // do more with item object as required (e.g. save to database)
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <ReactExample name="fruit" value={this.state.fruit} handleChange={this.handleChange} />
    )
  }

}

included component (which is now a stateless functional):

export const ReactExample = ({ name, value, handleChange }) => (
  <select name={name} value={value} onChange={handleChange}>
    <option value="A">Apple</option>
    <option value="B">Banana</option>
    <option value="C">Cranberry</option>
  </select>
)

PREVIOUS ANSWER (using bind):

in main component:

class ReactMain extends React.Component {

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    // bind once here, better than multiple times in render
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.state = { fruit: props.item.fruit };
  }

  handleChange(event) {
    this.setState({ [event.target.name]: event.target.value });
  }

  saveItem() {
    const item = {};
    item.fruit = this.state.fruit;
    // do more with item object as required (e.g. save to database)
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <ReactExample name="fruit" value={this.state.fruit} handleChange={this.handleChange} />
    )
  }

}

included component (which is now a stateless functional):

export const ReactExample = (props) => (
  <select name={props.name} value={props.value} onChange={props.handleChange}>
    <option value="A">Apple</option>
    <option value="B">Banana</option>
    <option value="C">Cranberry</option>
  </select>
)

the main component maintains the selected value for fruit (in state), the included component displays the select element and updates are passed back to the main component to update its state (which then loops back to the included component to change the selected value).

Note the use of a name prop which allows you to declare a single handleChange method for other fields on the same form regardless of their type.

4
  • Note the line in the constructor this.handleChange.bind(this); should be this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this); – Will Shaver May 18 '17 at 22:20
  • for those of you like me who asking them self what the ... means: reactjs.org/docs/jsx-in-depth.html#spread-attributes – talsibony Dec 25 '17 at 21:31
  • 1
    @talsibony - that is indeed the spread operator, but in my sample code it just means insert some other code here ! – Andy Lorenz Dec 31 '17 at 16:57
  • @AndyLorenz So in that case I would recommend to remove it... :), or just write comment like // rest of your code – talsibony Jan 1 '18 at 9:08
10

Here is the latest example of how to do it. From react docs, plus auto-binding "fat-arrow" method syntax.

class FlavorForm extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {value: 'coconut'};
  }

  handleChange = (event) =>
    this.setState({value: event.target.value});

  handleSubmit = (event) => {
    alert('Your favorite flavor is: ' + this.state.value);
    event.preventDefault();
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <label>
          Pick your favorite flavor:
          <select value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange}>
            <option value="grapefruit">Grapefruit</option>
            <option value="lime">Lime</option>
            <option value="coconut">Coconut</option>
            <option value="mango">Mango</option>
          </select>
        </label>
        <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
      </form>
    );
  }
} 
5

Simply add as first option of your select tag:

<option disabled hidden value=''></option>

This will become default and when you'll select a valid option will be setted on your state

3

With React 16.8. We can do this with hooks like the following example

Codesandbox link

import React, { useState } from "react";
import "./styles.css";

export default function App() {
  const options = [
    "Monty Python and the Holy Grail",
    "Monty Python's Life of Brian",
    "Monty Python's The Meaning of Life"
  ];
  const filmsByTati = [
    {
      id: 1,
      title: "Jour de fête",
      releasedYear: 1949
    },
    {
      id: 2,
      title: "Play time",
      releasedYear: 1967
    },
    {
      id: 3,
      releasedYear: 1958,
      title: "Mon Oncle"
    }
  ];
  const [selectedOption, setSelectedOption] = useState(options[0]);
  const [selectedTatiFilm, setSelectedTatiFilm] = useState(filmsByTati[0]);
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <h1>Select Example</h1>
      <select
        value={selectedOption}
        onChange={(e) => setSelectedOption(e.target.value)}
      >
        {options.map((option) => (
          <option key={option} value={option}>
            {option}
          </option>
        ))}
      </select>
      <span>Selected option: {selectedOption}</span>

      <select
        value={selectedTatiFilm}
        onChange={(e) =>
          setSelectedTatiFilm(
            filmsByTati.find(film => (film.id == e.target.value))
          )
        }
      >
        {filmsByTati.map((film) => (
          <option key={film.id} value={film.id}>
            {film.title}
          </option>
        ))}
      </select>
      <span>Selected option: {selectedTatiFilm.title}</span>
    </div>
  );
}
2
***Html:***
<div id="divContainer"></div>

var colors = [{ Name: 'Red' }, { Name: 'Green' }, { Name: 'Blue' }];
var selectedColor = 'Green';

ReactDOM.render(<Container></Container>, document.getElementById("divContainer"));

var Container = React.createClass({
    render: function () {
        return (
        <div>            
            <DropDown data={colors} Selected={selectedColor}></DropDown>
        </div>);
    }
});

***Option 1:***
var DropDown = React.createClass(
{
    render: function () {
        var items = this.props.data;
        return (
        <select value={this.props.Selected}>
            {
                items.map(function (item) {
                    return <option value={item.Name }>{item.Name}</option>;
                })
            }
        </select>);
    }
});

***Option 2:***
var DropDown = React.createClass(
{
    render: function () {
        var items = this.props.data;
        return (
        <select>
            {
                items.map(function (item) {
                    return <option value={item.Name} selected={selectedItem == item.Name}>{item.Name}</option>;
                })
            }
        </select>);
    }
});

***Option 3:***
var DropDown = React.createClass(
    {
        render: function () {
            var items = this.props.data;
            return (
            <select>
                {
                    items.map(function (item) {

                                            if (selectedItem == item.Name)
                    return <option value={item.Name } selected>{item.Name}</option>;
                else
                    return <option value={item.Name }>{item.Name}</option>;
                    })
                }
            </select>);
        }
    });
1
  • 1
    Even though no explanation was given, one wasn't really needed. The multiple ways to approach the same problem was really helpful insight. Thanks – DJ2 Aug 17 '18 at 17:14
1

Use defaultValue to preselect the values for Select.

<Select defaultValue={[{ value: category.published, label: 'Publish' }]} options={statusOptions} onChange={handleStatusChange} />
0

I've had a problem with <select> tags not updating to the correct <option> when the state changes. My problem seemed to be that if you render twice in quick succession, the first time with no pre-selected <option> but the second time with one, then the <select> tag doesn't update on the second render, but stays on the default first .

I found a solution to this using refs. You need to get a reference to your <select> tag node (which might be nested in some component), and then manually update the value property on it, in the componentDidUpdate hook.

componentDidUpdate(){
  let selectNode = React.findDOMNode(this.refs.selectingComponent.refs.selectTag);
  selectNode.value = this.state.someValue;
}
0

Posting a similar answer for MULTISELECT / optgroups:

render() {
  return(
    <div>
      <select defaultValue="1" onChange={(e) => this.props.changeHandler(e.target.value) }>
        <option disabled="disabled" value="1" hidden="hidden">-- Select --</option>
        <optgroup label="Group 1">
          {options1}
        </optgroup>
        <optgroup label="Group 2">
          {options2}
        </optgroup>
      </select>
    </div>
  )
}
0

I have a simple solution is following the HTML basic.

<input
  type="select"
  defaultValue=""
  >
  <option value="" disabled className="text-hide">Please select</option>
  <option>value1</option>
  <option>value1</option>
</input>

.text-hide is a bootstrap's class, if you not using bootstrap, here you are:

.text-hide {
  font: 0/0 a;
  color: transparent;
  text-shadow: none;
  background-color: transparent;
  border: 0;
}
0

I was making a drop-down menu for a language selector - but I needed the dropdown menu to display the current language upon page load. I would either be getting my initial language from a URL param example.com?user_language=fr, or detecting it from the user’s browser settings. Then when the user interacted with the dropdown, the selected language would be updated and the language selector dropdown would display the currently selected language.

Since this whole thread has been giving fruit examples, I got all sorts of fruit goodness for you.

  • First up, answering the initially asked question with a basic React functional component - two examples with and without props, then how to import the component elsewhere.

  • Next up, the same example - but juiced up with Typescript.

  • Then a bonus finale - A language selector dropdown component using Typescript.


Basic React (16.13.1) Functional Component Example. Two examples of FruitSelectDropdown , one without props & one with accepting props fruitDetector

import React, { useState } from 'react'

export const FruitSelectDropdown = () => {
  const [currentFruit, setCurrentFruit] = useState('oranges')
  
  const changeFruit = (newFruit) => {
    setCurrentFruit(newFruit)
  }
  
  return (
    <form>
      <select 
        onChange={(event) => changeFruit(event.target.value)}
        value={currentFruit}
      >
        <option value="apples">Red Apples</option>
        <option value="oranges">Outrageous Oranges</option>
        <option value="tomatoes">Technically a Fruit Tomatoes</option>
        <option value="bananas">Bodacious Bananas</option>
      </select>
    </form>
  )
}

Or you can have FruitSelectDropdown accept props, maybe you have a function that outputs a string, you can pass it through using the fruitDetector prop

import React, { useState } from 'react'

export const FruitSelectDropdown = ({ fruitDetector }) => {
  const [currentFruit, setCurrentFruit] = useState(fruitDetector)
  
  const changeFruit = (newFruit) => {
    setCurrentFruit(newFruit)
  }
  
  return (
    <form>
      <select 
        onChange={(event) => changeFruit(event.target.value)}
        value={currentFruit}
      >
        <option value="apples">Red Apples</option>
        <option value="oranges">Outrageous Oranges</option>
        <option value="tomatoes">Technically a Fruit Tomatoes</option>
        <option value="bananas">Bodacious Bananas</option>
      </select>
    </form>
  )
}

Then import the FruitSelectDropdown elsewhere in your app

import React from 'react'
import { FruitSelectDropdown } from '../path/to/FruitSelectDropdown'

const App = () => {
  return (
    <div className="page-container">
      <h1 className="header">A webpage about fruit</h1>
      <div className="section-container">
        <h2>Pick your favorite fruit</h2>
        <FruitSelectDropdown fruitDetector='bananas' />

      </div>
    </div>
  )
}

export default App

FruitSelectDropdown with Typescript

import React, { FC, useState } from 'react'

type FruitProps = {
  fruitDetector: string;
}

export const FruitSelectDropdown: FC<FruitProps> = ({ fruitDetector }) => {
  const [currentFruit, setCurrentFruit] = useState(fruitDetector)
  
  const changeFruit = (newFruit: string): void => {
    setCurrentFruit(newFruit)
  }
  
  return (
    <form>
      <select 
        onChange={(event) => changeFruit(event.target.value)}
        value={currentFruit}
      >
        <option value="apples">Red Apples</option>
        <option value="oranges">Outrageous Oranges</option>
        <option value="tomatoes">Technically a Fruit Tomatoes</option>
        <option value="bananas">Bodacious Bananas</option>
      </select>
    </form>
  )
}

Then import the FruitSelectDropdown elsewhere in your app

import React, { FC } from 'react'
import { FruitSelectDropdown } from '../path/to/FruitSelectDropdown'

const App: FC = () => {
  return (
    <div className="page-container">
      <h1 className="header">A webpage about fruit</h1>
      <div className="section-container">
        <h2>Pick your favorite fruit</h2>
        <FruitSelectDropdown fruitDetector='bananas' />

      </div>
    </div>
  )
}

export default App

Bonus Round: Translation Dropdown with selected current value:

import React, { FC, useState } from 'react'
import { useTranslation } from 'react-i18next'

export const LanguageSelectDropdown: FC = () => {
  const { i18n } = useTranslation()
  const i18nLanguage = i18n.language
  const [currentI18nLanguage, setCurrentI18nLanguage] = useState(i18nLanguage)
  
  const changeLanguage = (language: string): void => {
    i18n.changeLanguage(language)
    setCurrentI18nLanguage(language)
  }
  
  return (
    <form>
      <select 
        onChange={(event) => changeLanguage(event.target.value)}
        value={currentI18nLanguage}
      >
        <option value="en">English</option>
        <option value="de">Deutsch</option>
        <option value="es">Español</option>
        <option value="fr">Français</option>
      </select>
    </form>
  )
}

An invaluable resource for React/Typescript

-2

I got around a similar issue by setting defaultProps:

ComponentName.defaultProps = {
  propName: ''
}

<select value="this.props.propName" ...

So now I avoid errors on compilation if my prop does not exist until mounting.

1
  • That's really not solving the problem. You'll get this: Warning: Failed prop type: You provided a value prop to a form field without an onChange handler. This will render a read-only field. If the field should be mutable use defaultValue. Otherwise, set either onChange or readOnly. – Jason Rice Feb 21 '19 at 17:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.