i am trying to read UTF8 text from a text file, and then print some of it to another file. I am using Linux and gcc compiler. This is the code i am using:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(){
    FILE *fin;
    FILE *fout;
    int character;
    fin=fopen("in.txt", "r");
    fout=fopen("out.txt","w");
    while((character=fgetc(fin))!=EOF){
        putchar(character); // It displays the right character (UTF8) in the terminal
        fprintf(fout,"%c ",character); // It displays weird characters in the file
    }
    fclose(fin);
    fclose(fout);
    printf("\nFile has been created...\n");
    return 0;
}

It works for English characters for now.

  • 5
    You do realize that UTF-8 is a multibyte encoding, right? Inserting spaces between each byte (fprintf statement) will probably break that encoding in your output file. – ldav1s Feb 12 '14 at 19:49
  • I usually use wchar_t and wstring with fwprintf (wide characters) for persian characters. – Behnam Safari Feb 12 '14 at 20:01
  • if fprintf breaks the encoding, what should i use instead of fprintf do you suggest? – user2768374 Feb 12 '14 at 20:05
  • 2
    "wide characters" are 99% broken in C (different compilers have different ideas about what a wide character is). Best is either load it as "raw uint8_t bytes" and do it yourself (if it's a simple thing), or use a decent internationalisation library (if it's more than a simple thing). – Brendan Feb 12 '14 at 20:58
  • 2
    fprintf is not breaking the encoding. The format string of fprintf in your code is breaking the encoding. If you are wishing to insert a space between each Unicode code point read (which is what is "working" for English), your code must become UTF-8 aware. A way to do this is to buffer up the bytes you are reading in until you have a code point then fprintf(fout, "%s ", utf8cp); where utf8cp is char utf8cp[5]; It's 5 bytes long since UTF-8 characters are 1-4 bytes + terminating '\0'. – ldav1s Feb 13 '14 at 3:19

Instead of

fprintf(fout,"%c ",character);

use

fprintf(fout,"%c",character);

The second fprintf() does not contain a space after %c which is what was causing out.txt to display weird characters. The reason is that fgetc() is retrieving a single byte (the same thing as an ASCII character), not a UTF-8 character. Since UTF-8 is also ASCII compatible, it will write English characters to the file just fine.

putchar(character) output the bytes sequentially without the extra space between every byte so the original UTF-8 sequence remained intact. To see what I'm talking about, try

while((character=fgetc(fin))!=EOF){
    putchar(character);
    printf(" "); // This mimics what you are doing when you write to out.txt
    fprintf(fout,"%c ",character);
}

If you want to write UTF-8 characters with the space between them to out.txt, you would need to handle the variable length encoding of a UTF-8 character.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* The first byte of a UTF-8 character
 * indicates how many bytes are in
 * the character, so only check that
 */
int numberOfBytesInChar(unsigned char val) {
    if (val < 128) {
        return 1;
    } else if (val < 224) {
        return 2;
    } else if (val < 240) {
        return 3;
    } else {
        return 4;
    }
}

int main(){
    FILE *fin;
    FILE *fout;
    int character;
    fin = fopen("in.txt", "r");
    fout = fopen("out.txt","w");
    while( (character = fgetc(fin)) != EOF) {
        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfBytesInChar((unsigned char)character) - 1; i++) {
            putchar(character);
            fprintf(fout, "%c", character);
            character = fgetc(fin);
        }
        putchar(character);
        printf(" ");
        fprintf(fout, "%c ", character);
    }
    fclose(fin);
    fclose(fout);
    printf("\nFile has been created...\n");
    return 0;
}
  • Thank you, your answer gives some insight how utf-8 works. – Spliffster Nov 6 '14 at 16:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code worked for me:

/* fgetwc example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <locale.h>
int main ()
{
  setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8");
  FILE * fin;
  FILE * fout;
  wint_t wc;
  fin=fopen ("in.txt","r");
  fout=fopen("out.txt","w");
  while((wc=fgetwc(fin))!=WEOF){
        // work with: "wc"
  }
  fclose(fin);
  fclose(fout);
  printf("File has been created...\n");
  return 0;
}

If you do not wish to use the wide options, experiment with the following:

Read and write bytes, not characters. Also known as, use binary, not text.

fgetc effectively gets a byte from a file, but if the byte is greater than 127, try treating it as a int instead of a char. fputc, on the other hand, silently ignores putting a char > 127. It will work if you use an int rather than char as the input.

Also, in the open mode, try using binary, so try rb & wb rather than r & w

The C-style solution is very insightful, but if you'd consider using C++ the task becomes much more high level and it does not require you to have so much knowledge about utf-8 encoding. Consider the following:

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>

int main(){
  wifstream input { "in.txt" }
  wofstream output { "out.txt" }

  // Look out - this part is not portable to windows                                             
  locale utf8 {"en_us.UTF-8"};   

  input.imbue(utf8);                                                             
  output.imbue(utf8);
  wcout.imbue(utf8);

  wchar_t c;

  while(input >> noskipws >> c) {
    wcout << c;
    output << c; 
  }

  return 0;  
}

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