I got a data frame in R where one of the fields is composite (delimited). Here's an example of what I got:

users=c(1,2,3)
items=c("23 77 49", "10 18 28", "20 31 84")
df = data.frame(users,items)

(I don't build it; this is just for illustrative purposes.)

  users    items
  1        23 77 49
  2        10 18 28
  3        20 31 84

I want to flatten the second column in order to have a list of (non-unique) user IDs and an individual item per row. So I want to end up with:

user   item
1        23
1        77
1        49
2        10
2        18
2        28
3        20
3        31
3        84

I tried:

data.frame(user = df$users, item = unlist(strsplit(as.character(df$items), " "))) 

But I get "arguments imply differing number of rows". I understand why, but can't find a solution to give me the result I want. Any ideas?

Also, what is the most efficient way as I got more than 20 million rows of this?

  • Are there always going to be the same number of items in each "item" row? – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 13 '14 at 4:04
  • @AnandaMahto No. Each row could have a different number of delimited items. – Yehia Feb 13 '14 at 22:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted
items <- strsplit(df$items, " ")
data.frame(user = rep(df$users, sapply(items, length)), item = unlist(items))

##   user item                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 1    1   23                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 2    1   77                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 3    1   49                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 4    2   10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 5    2   18                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 6    2   28                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 7    3   20                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 8    3   31                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
## 9    3   84  

or

library(data.table)

DT <- data.table(df)    
DT[, list(item = unlist(strsplit(items, " "))), by = users]

##    users item                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 1:     1   23                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 2:     1   77                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 3:     1   49                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 4:     2   10                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 5:     2   18                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 6:     2   28                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 7:     3   20                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 8:     3   31                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
## 9:     3   84 
  • As a very straightforward and easily readable approach, I like the data.table option a lot +1 – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 13 '14 at 16:16

Here is a dplyr solution

users=c(1,2,3)
items=c("23 77 49", "10 18 28", "20 31 84")
df = data.frame(users,items,stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
rbind_all(do(df %.% group_by(users), 
          .f = function(d) data.frame(d[,1,drop=FALSE], 
              items = unlist(strsplit(d[['items']],' ')), 
           stringsAsFactors=FALSE)))

It would be really nice to have an expand function, i.e. the opposite of summarise

eg. if the following would work.

df %.% group_by(users) %.% expand(unlist(strsplit(items,' ')))
  • That's some nice performance. It seems like this reverses the "users" column in the output. Any idea why? – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 13 '14 at 16:15
  • @AnandaMahto - it does do something strange to the ordering. Not quite reversing.I might report this. – mnel Feb 13 '14 at 22:13
  • @AnandaMahto -- It appears to be due the class of users. See github.com/hadley/dplyr/issues/263 – mnel Feb 13 '14 at 22:26

If you're willing to install my "SOfun" package or load my concat.split.DT function, AND if there are the same number of items in each "item" string (in your example, there are 3), then the following might be an option:

library(reshape2)
library(data.table)

melt(concat.split.DT(indf, "items", " "), id.vars="users")

Here's an example.

Sample data: 3 rows, 3000 rows, and 3,000,000 rows

I've added an "id" column so you can compare the output across the two options.

## your sample data.frame
df <- data.frame(users=c(1,2,3),
                 items=c("23 77 49", "10 18 28", "20 31 84"))

## extended to 3000 rows
df1k <- df[rep(rownames(df), 1000), ]
df1k$id <- sequence(nrow(df1k))

## extended to 3 million rows
df1m <- df1M <- df[rep(rownames(df), 1000000), ]
df1m$id <- sequence(nrow(df1m))

Load the required packages

  • "SOfun" (only on GitHub) for concat.split.DT which makes use of fread from "data.table" to split concatenated values.
  • "reshape2" for melt
  • "data.table" for its awesomeness, at least version 1.8.11

# library(devtools)
# install_github("SOfun", "mrdwab")
library(SOfun)
library(data.table)
library(reshape2)
packageVersion("data.table")
# [1] ‘1.8.11’

Here are some functions to test the speed of Jake's answer and this one. Later I'll try to update with "dplyr" too.

fun1 <- function(indf) {
  DT <- melt(concat.split.DT(indf, "items", " "), 
             id.vars=c("id", "users"))
  setkeyv(DT, c("id", "users"))
  DT
}

fun2 <- function(indf) {
  DT <- data.table(indf)    
  DT[, list(item = unlist(strsplit(as.character(items), " "))), 
     by = list(id, users)]
}

Testing on 3,000 rows

microbenchmark(fun1(df1k), fun2(df1k))
# Unit: milliseconds
#        expr       min        lq    median        uq      max neval
#  fun1(df1k)  17.64675  18.21658  18.79859  21.21943  71.7737   100
#  fun2(df1k) 152.97974 158.44148 163.12707 199.77297 345.7508   100

Testing (just once) on 3,000,000 rows

Time would be in seconds here....

system.time(fun1(df1m))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    7.71    0.94    8.69 
system.time(fun2(df1m))
#    user  system elapsed 
#  177.80    0.50  178.97 

Update

@Jake makes a good point in the comments that adding an "id" made a very big difference in timings. I added it just so that the output of the two data.table approaches could be easily compared to see that the results were the same.

Removing the "id" column and removing reference to "id" in fun1 and fun2 gives us the following:

microbenchmark(fun1a(df1M), fun2a(df1M), fun3(df1M), times = 5)
# Unit: seconds
#         expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#  fun1a(df1M)  2.307313  2.420845  2.630284  2.822011  3.074464     5
#  fun2a(df1M) 12.480502 12.491783 12.761392 13.069169 13.733686     5
#   fun3(df1M) 13.976329 14.281856 14.471252 15.041450 15.089593     5

Also benchmarked above is fun3, which is @mnel's "dplyr" approach.

fun3 <- function(indf) {
  rbind_all(do(indf %.% group_by(users), 
               .f = function(d) data.frame(
                 d[,1,drop=FALSE], 
                 items = unlist(strsplit(as.character(d[['items']]),' ')), 
                 stringsAsFactors=FALSE)))
}

Pretty nice performance all answers!

  • Adding in the id column seems to change things a lot – Jake Burkhead Feb 13 '14 at 15:40
  • @JakeBurkhead, you're right. I had added it so the output could be more easily compared and verified to contain the same data. I've updated with a benchmark showing how things look once "id" is removed. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 13 '14 at 15:56
  • Thanks for updating the benchmark. Those are about the times I was seeing from running it without id. – Jake Burkhead Feb 13 '14 at 16:26

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