28

I have a procedure in PostgreSQL that I want to add the number of minutes to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP like below

timestamp_var := CURRENT_TIMESTAMP + interval '20 minutes';

But the number of minutes is a parameter.

Do we have the functions to do this?

Pls help me in this case

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION modify_time(id users.id%TYPE, min integer) AS $$ 
BEGIN
UPDATE
        users
    SET
        modified_at = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    WHERE
        user_id = id;
END
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

I want to add min minutes to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP thanks

  • provide the full code – Ashish sinha Feb 13 '14 at 4:55
  • thanks for your reply Ashish, my code is very simple, i just want to add 10 or 20 minutes to current timestamp before I save to my database, I added my code as above – OneCart Feb 13 '14 at 5:06
  • 1
    Your title and tag refer to PL/SQL (Oracle) ... but your code is plpgsql (Postgres). These are two VERY different things. Please correct the title and tag. FWIW, the Oracle way would be numToDsInterval. – stv Feb 13 '14 at 6:07
  • I changed the title, thank stv – OneCart Feb 13 '14 at 6:46
57

You can multiply intervals by integers. The following gives you a timestamp 20 minutes in the future:

select current_timestamp + (20 * interval '1 minute')

Or, as murison mentions in another answer to this question, there is a more succinct way to express this:

select current_timestamp + (20 ||' minutes')::interval

So, your code could look like:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION modify_time(id users.id%TYPE, min integer) AS $$ 
BEGIN
UPDATE
        users
    SET
        modified_at = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP + (min * interval '1 minute')
    WHERE
        user_id = id;
END
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
| improve this answer | |
  • thank you in advanced stv, seem it works in Oracle, sorry I'm not asking clearly, I'm using PostgreSQL 8.4, can u help me ? – OneCart Feb 13 '14 at 5:42
  • I don't know about PostgreSQL, but you should change your question title. PL/SQL is an Oracle-only beast. Perhaps the date math version will work for PostgreSQL. – stv Feb 13 '14 at 5:52
  • Re-did the answer completely. I tested the raw select in Postgres 9.0, but I do not use Postgres every day, so this may not be the best solution. – stv Feb 13 '14 at 6:20
  • 1
    UPDATE: "select '20 minutes'::interval" works fine, at least now-a-days, 5 years later. – Mark Gerolimatos May 17 '18 at 19:52
30

the other way is

select current_timestamp + (20 ||' minutes')::interval
| improve this answer | |

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