7

I recently got interested in such a feature in Java, as functions with variable number of arguments. This is a very cool feature. But I'm interested:

void method(int x, String.. args) {
  // Do something
}

How is this actually implemented on the runtime level? What comes to my mind, is that when we have a call:

method(4, "Hello", "World!");

The last two arguments are internally transformed into an array, that is passed to the method. Am I right about this, or the JVM actually pushes in the stack refereneces to the strings, not just one reference to the array?

12

It is implemented at compile time level. You method is compiled to bytecode as

varargs method(I[Ljava/lang/String;)V
...

which is equivalent to

void method(int x, String[] args) {
...

with varargs flag.

And

method(4, "Hello", "World!");

is compiled as

method(4, new String[] {"Hello", "World!"});
4

such a method is converted into

void method(int x, String[] args) {
}

and its call

method(4, "Hello", "World!");

is converted into

method(4, new String[]{"Hello", "World!"});

Note that the last call can be written directly. This is useful when overriding vararg methods:

@Override
void method(int x, String... args) {
    String[] newArgs=new String[];
    ... // fill new args; then
    super.method(newArgs);
}
2

The last two arguments are internally transformed into an array, that is passed to the method. Am I right about this,

Yes, Your understanding is correct. An array constructs and passes as a argument.

To make sure that If you see the byte code of that call you can see the array there. An array creates and and passes to the destination.

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