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I am stuck in a strange predicament. I need to generate UUIDs in my Linux program (which I distribute using RPMs). I do not want to add another dependency to my application by requiring the user to install libuuid (seems like libuuid isn't included in most Linux distros, like CentOS).

Isn't there a standard Linux system call which generates UUIDs (like say, in Windows there CoCreateGuid)? What does the command uuidgen use?

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8 Answers 8

28

Am I missing something? Can't you:

cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/uuid
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  • 2
    May not be portable to other Linux systems. Commented Jan 4, 2015 at 1:14
  • How expensive is that? Isn't it a hardware based entropy pool for Linux? Those are usually expensive. Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 10:58
13

Thanks for all your comments!

I went through each one, and here's what suited my requirement the best:

What I needed was just plain time-based UUIDs which were generated from random numbers once for every user who installed the application. UUID version 4 as specified in RFC 4122 was exactly it. I went through a the algorithm suggested, and came up with a pretty simple solution which would work in Linux as well as Windows (Maybe its too simplistic, but it does satisfy the need!):

srand(time(NULL));

sprintf(strUuid, "%x%x-%x-%x-%x-%x%x%x", 
    rand(), rand(),                 // Generates a 64-bit Hex number
    rand(),                         // Generates a 32-bit Hex number
    ((rand() & 0x0fff) | 0x4000),   // Generates a 32-bit Hex number of the form 4xxx (4 indicates the UUID version)
    rand() % 0x3fff + 0x8000,       // Generates a 32-bit Hex number in the range [0x8000, 0xbfff]
    rand(), rand(), rand());        // Generates a 96-bit Hex number
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  • Sure! Thanks for pointing me in the right direction, I had no idea! I hadn't accepted the answer because I'd come up with it on my own and thought it too simplistic!! Commented Dec 24, 2011 at 18:37
  • Your terminology is a bit confusing - the term "time-based UUID" is not version 4 but version 1. On the theoretical side, using modulus 0x3fff would not give you a smooth distribution of outputs, though I doubt it would have any practical implications.
    – oferei
    Commented Sep 24, 2015 at 22:23
  • 1
    so if this function is called twice on the same second, it will return the same value. How do you manage that? Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 10:59
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    very simple working answer... thank you. also it is portable and can work directly on many platforms.
    – M.Hefny
    Commented Nov 5, 2019 at 22:55
  • @themoondothshine thanks a million. Stuck all afternoon on HP-UX trying to generate a UUID and you have come up with this super elegant solution. I have a chocolate cake in the fridge, I would gladly overnight it to you as a thank you!
    – Beezer
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 16:10
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A good way I found (for linux dev) is to #include <uuid/uuid.h>. Then you have a few functions you can call:

void uuid_generate(uuid_t out);
void uuid_generate_random(uuid_t out);
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Is there any reason why you can't just link statically to libuuid?

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    libuuid appears to be LGPL, so the OP's application would also have to be LGPL. Dynamic linking avoids the license requirement. Source. Unless you're talking about a different libuuid.
    – beatgammit
    Commented May 22, 2013 at 15:50
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I can't post comments on answers yet, but I'd just like to point out that the accepted answer's use of rand() won't work well at all on Windows, where RAND_MAX is defined as 0x7fff, giving just 15 bits of randomness. On Linux it's higher, but looks like it's 0x7fffffff, giving 31 bits of randomness, still missing 1 bit to full 32 bit length.

The safest way to use rand() would be to rely on the fact that the lowest guaranteed RAND_MAX value anywhere is going to be 0x7fff - call it multiple times, shifting left by 15 bits and OR'ing with a new value, until the required amount of random bits is produced.

Also, the format string in sprintf should have width specified, so leading zeros are taken into account (the widths are based on the mentioned bits in the respective argument comment):

sprintf(strUuid, "%08x%08x-%08x-%08x-%08x-%08x%08x%08x", 
    rand(), rand(),                 // Generates a 64-bit Hex number
    rand(),                         // Generates a 32-bit Hex number
    ((rand() & 0x0fff) | 0x4000),   // Generates a 32-bit Hex number of the form 4xxx (4 indicates the UUID version)
    rand() % 0x3fff + 0x8000,       // Generates a 32-bit Hex number in the range [0x8000, 0xbfff]
    rand(), rand(), rand());        // Generates a 96-bit Hex number

Furthermore - the code produces 256 bit values, rather than 128 bit values compatible with RFC 4122 UUIDs.

And final comment:

rand() % 0x3fff + 0x8000,       // Generates a 32-bit Hex number in the range [0x8000, 0xbfff]

due to the modulo operator, the actual range produced is [0x8000, 0xbffe]. The % should have been & (or 0x3fff should have been 0x4000 if using %, but division is always a more expensive operation than bitwise AND).

Here's a revised version of the code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <cstdint>

uint32_t rand32()
{
    return ((rand() & 0x3) << 30) | ((rand() & 0x7fff) << 15) | (rand() & 0x7fff);
}

bool gen_uuid4(char dst[37], size_t len)
{
    int n = snprintf(dst, len, "%08x-%04x-%04x-%04x-%04x%08x", 
        rand32(),                         // Generates a 32-bit Hex number
        rand32() & 0xffff,                // Generates a 16-bit Hex number
        ((rand32() & 0x0fff) | 0x4000),   // Generates a 16-bit Hex number of the form 4xxx (4 indicates the UUID version)
        (rand32() & 0x3fff) + 0x8000,     // Generates a 16-bit Hex number in the range [0x8000, 0xbfff]
        rand32() & 0xffff, rand32());     // Generates a 48-bit Hex number
        
    return n >= 0 && n < len;             // Success only when snprintf result is a positive number and the provided buffer was large enough.
}

int main()
{
    char strUuid[37];
    srand(time(NULL));
    
    bool success = gen_uuid4(strUuid, sizeof(strUuid));
    
    printf("%s\n", success ? strUuid : "UUID generation failed!");
    
    return 0;
}
2

Perhaps ooid will help? http://ooid.sourceforge.net/

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No system call exists in POSIX to generate UUID, but I guess you can find somewhere a BSD/MIT code to generate the UUID. ooid is released under the Boost software license, which according to wikipedia, is a permissive license in the style of BSD/MIT. Then you can just paste it into your application, without any need to add dependencies.

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uuidgen on my ubuntu linux dist works just fine.

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