34

How can I get 'pk' or 'id' in get_context_data from CBV DetailView?

class MyDetail(DetailView):
    model = Book
    template_name = 'book.html'
    
    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
            context = super(MyDetail, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
            context['something'] = Book.objects.filter(pk=pk)
            return context

url:

url(r'^book/(?P<pk>\d+)/$', MyDetail.as_view(), name='book'),
2
  • In template use like something.0.pk Feb 13, 2014 at 15:44
  • I confused due to CVB do you means Class Based Views (CBV)?.. Feb 13, 2014 at 15:55

7 Answers 7

64

You can get it from self.kwargs['pk'].

I'm not sure why you want to, though, since the superclass already gets the Book corresponding to that pk - that's the whole point of a DetailView.

2
  • My queryset looks different (is more complex). Book.objects.filter(pk=pk) is just example. Thanks. Feb 13, 2014 at 15:49
  • This is such a common mistake, this answer should be pinned to the top! Mar 31, 2023 at 15:59
8
class MyDetail(DetailView):
    model = Book
    template_name = 'book.html'

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
            context = super(MyDetail, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
            context['something'] =Book.objects.filter(pk=self.kwargs.get('pk'))
            return context
7

self.kwargs['pk'] it doesn't work in Django 2.2

in DetailView

self.object is the object that this view is displaying.

So, to access the object's fields like id or pk just self.object.id or self.object.pk

So, The answer in Django 2.2 can be like:

class MyDetail(DetailView):
    model = Book
    template_name = 'book.html'

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
            context = super().get_context_data(**kwargs)
            context['something'] = Book.objects.filter(pk=self.object.pk)    # <<<---
            return context

Django 2.2 Doc

5

In get_context_data you already have the object in self.object (and you can do self.object.pk). Here's what happens upstream in the class hierarchy (DetailView inherits from BaseDetailView):

class BaseDetailView(SingleObjectMixin, View):
"""
A base view for displaying a single object
"""
def get(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
    self.object = self.get_object()
    context = self.get_context_data(object=self.object)
    return self.render_to_response(context)

Reading Django source code to understand stuff is incredibly easy.

And by the way, I am not sure you can always rely on the fact that kwargs has a 'pk' key.

3

In addition to getting it from self.kwargs as Daniel Roseman suggested, you can use self.get_object().pk, for example if you change your URL identifier from pk to, say, slug or something.

3

you can simply get it in the 'get' method, like this:

def get_context_data(self, request, pk, *args, **kwargs):
    context = super(MyDetail, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
    context['something'] =Book.objects.filter(pk=self.kwargs.get('pk'))
    return context
1
def get_context_data(self, request, pk, *args, **kwargs):
    context = super(MyDetail, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
    context['something'] =Book.objects.filter(pk=self.kwargs.get('pk'))
    return context

Filter returns a query set that matches the lookup parameter (pk). Since 'pk' is unique, it would return the same results as get but for performance issues, ideally you'd want to use the get method to return one single object:

def get_context_data(self, request, pk, *args, **kwargs):
    context = super(MyDetail, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
    context['something'] =Book.objects.get(pk=self.kwargs.get('pk'))
    return context

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