276

I read the other threads that had to do with this error and it seems that my problem has an interesting distinct difference than all the posts I read so far, namely, all the other posts so far have the error in regards to either a user created class or a builtin system resource. I am experiencing this problem when calling a function, I can't figure out what it could be for. Any ideas?

BOX_LENGTH = 100
turtle.speed(0)
fill = 0
for i in range(8):
    fill += 1
    if fill % 2 == 0:
        Horizontol_drawbox(BOX_LENGTH, fillBox = False)
    else:
        Horizontol_drawbox(BOX_LENGTH, fillBox = True)

    for i in range(8):
        fill += 1
        if fill % 2 == 0:
            Vertical_drawbox(BOX_LENGTH,fillBox = False)
        else:
            Vertical_drawbox(BOX_LENGTH,fillBox = True)

Error message:

    Horizontol_drawbox(BOX_LENGTH, fillBox = True)
TypeError: Horizontol_drawbox() got multiple values for argument 'fillBox'
1
  • 7
    What is the declaration of the Horizontol_drawbox function? If it starts with fillBox, then that's the fault (assigned one time with positional argument, and a second time with keyword argument).
    – Cilyan
    Feb 13, 2014 at 20:33

6 Answers 6

386

This happens when a keyword argument is specified that overwrites a positional argument. For example, let's imagine a function that draws a colored box. The function selects the color to be used and delegates the drawing of the box to another function, relaying all extra arguments.

def color_box(color, *args, **kwargs):
    painter.select_color(color)
    painter.draw_box(*args, **kwargs)

Then the call

color_box("blellow", color="green", height=20, width=30)

will fail because two values are assigned to color: "blellow" as positional and "green" as keyword. (painter.draw_box is supposed to accept the height and width arguments).

This is easy to see in the example, but of course if one mixes up the arguments at call, it may not be easy to debug:

# misplaced height and width
color_box(20, 30, color="green")

Here, color is assigned 20, then args=[30] and color is again assigned "green".

6
  • Interesting - when I hit this error, it was also about a color argument. The issue was a bit different - my model_matrix argument became keyword-only, and some legacy code had it passed as a positional argument. The new API was expecting color, and got a 4x4 matrix instead. Aug 16, 2017 at 19:15
  • Hi, I don't get it for the second example. It also satisfies the condition: When a keyword argument is specified that overwrites a positional argument. But why the latter one can work? What's the rule when python assign the arguments. Thank you.
    – Alston
    Nov 15, 2017 at 14:59
  • 2
    @Stallman: the second example I gave is also a non-working one. color=20 conflicts with color="green". The rule for assignment is given right after. More info: docs.python.org/3/tutorial/controlflow.html#keyword-arguments Particularly the 3rd of the 4 "invalid calls" examples.
    – Cilyan
    Nov 17, 2017 at 16:58
  • I got this error when I did: dict(**{'a': 1}, **{'a': 2}). It works fine if we don't repeat the param names: dict(**{'a': 1}, **{'b': 2}).
    – Robo Robok
    Sep 16, 2020 at 15:14
  • @RoboRobok indeed, this is a "new way" (3.5) to get the error and is described in python.org/dev/peps/pep-0448/#specification I suggest you add you own answer to the question, to make it easier for the next visitors to find your suggestion.
    – Cilyan
    Sep 18, 2020 at 11:51
127

I had the same problem that is really easy to make, but took me a while to see through.

I had copied the declaration to where I was using it and had left the 'self' argument there, but it took me ages to realise that.

I had

self.myFunction(self, a, b, c='123')

but it should have been

self.myFunction(a, b, c='123')
6
  • 2
    Or replace first self with the class name. ;) Aug 16, 2017 at 19:16
  • Thanks. Short and strait
    – ofir_aghai
    Jan 13, 2021 at 20:28
  • 1
    I can not tell you how long I was struggling until I find your answer.
    – Mark Dibeh
    Mar 29, 2021 at 14:32
  • I love you man i was struggling until i realized i had copied the method declaration too before inheriting it :)
    – Hadok 361
    Jun 25, 2021 at 19:56
  • Great tip, my problem was very similar with invoking a super init and accidentally had ` super().__init__(self, instance, *args, **kwargs)` instead of super().__init__(instance, *args, **kwargs). Jul 1, 2021 at 15:47
86

This also happens if you forget selfdeclaration inside class methods.

Example:

class Example():
    def is_overlapping(x1, x2, y1, y2):
        # Thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/a/12888920/940592
        return max(x1, y1) <= min(x2, y2)

Fails calling it like self.is_overlapping(x1=2, x2=4, y1=3, y2=5) with:

{TypeError} is_overlapping() got multiple values for argument 'x1'

WORKS:

class Example():
    def is_overlapping(self, x1, x2, y1, y2):
        # Thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/a/12888920/940592
        return max(x1, y1) <= min(x2, y2)
5
  • 5
    This comment helps me spot my problem: I forget to add a self argument inside the function declaration. i.e. what should be def myFunction(self, a, b, c='123') was written as def myFunction(a, b, c='123'). And because b takes a list and c takes a scalar, when missing self the arguments messed up and eventually the input of b goes to c, causing the "multiple arguments" error. I make this mistake because I tested this internal method outside the class and forget to add the self back in. Hope helpful for someone else!
    – yuqli
    Feb 4, 2019 at 3:15
  • @yuqli This is exactly how I get into this problem as well. ;) Nice to hear that this post helped you.
    – gies0r
    Feb 11, 2019 at 9:57
  • 1
    saved me quite some time as well :)
    – nexla
    Jul 19, 2019 at 9:53
  • Also works after decorating the function with @staticmethod which may be a better approach when self is not inherently required.
    – ayorgo
    Dec 17, 2019 at 7:38
  • Wow this is really non-obvious! I thought after over a decade of Python I knew what to look for to spot a "you forgot 'self' again!" error, but I was wrong... Thanks for this!
    – bob
    Mar 29 at 20:27
6

This exception also will be raised whenever a function has been called with the combination of keyword arguments and args, kwargs

Example:

def function(a, b, c, *args, **kwargs):
    print(f"a: {a}, b: {b}, c: {c}, args: {args}, kwargs: {kwargs}")

function(a=1, b=2, c=3, *(4,))

And it'll raise:

TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-4-1dcb84605fe5> in <module>
----> 1 function(a=1, b=2, c=3, *(4,))

TypeError: function() got multiple values for argument 'a'

And Also it'll become more complicated, whenever you misuse it in the inheritance. so be careful we this stuff!

1- Calling a function with keyword arguments and args:

class A:
    def __init__(self, a, b, *args, **kwargs):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
    
class B(A):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):

        a = 1
        b = 2
        super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)

B(3, c=2)

Exception:

TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-5-17e0c66a5a95> in <module>
     11         super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)
     12 
---> 13 B(3, c=2)

<ipython-input-5-17e0c66a5a95> in __init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
      9         a = 1
     10         b = 2
---> 11         super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)
     12 
     13 B(3, c=2)

TypeError: __init__() got multiple values for argument 'a'

2- Calling a function with keyword arguments and kwargs which it contains keyword arguments too:

class A:
    def __init__(self, a, b, *args, **kwargs):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
    
class B(A):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):

        a = 1
        b = 2
        super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)

B(**{'a': 2})

Exception:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-7-c465f5581810> in <module>
     11         super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)
     12 
---> 13 B(**{'a': 2})

<ipython-input-7-c465f5581810> in __init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
      9         a = 1
     10         b = 2
---> 11         super(B, self).__init__(a=a, b=b, *args, **kwargs)
     12 
     13 B(**{'a': 2})

TypeError: __init__() got multiple values for keyword argument 'a'
1
  • 11
    I don't understand the solution here. The error is explained but a solution is not offered? Oct 11, 2021 at 19:58
5

I was brought here for a reason not explicitly mentioned in the answers so far, so to save others the trouble:

The error also occurs if the function arguments have changed order - for the same reason as in the accepted answer: the positional arguments clash with the keyword arguments.

In my case it was because the argument order of the Pandas set_axis function changed between 0.20 and 0.22:

0.20: DataFrame.set_axis(axis, labels)
0.22: DataFrame.set_axis(labels, axis=0, inplace=None)

Using the commonly found examples for set_axis results in this confusing error, since when you call:

df.set_axis(['a', 'b', 'c'], axis=1)

prior to 0.22, ['a', 'b', 'c'] is assigned to axis because it's the first argument, and then the positional argument provides "multiple values".

4

Simply put you can't do the following:

class C(object):
    def x(self, y, **kwargs):
        # Which y to use, kwargs or declaration? 
        pass

c = C()
y = "Arbitrary value"
kwargs["y"] = "Arbitrary value"
c.x(y, **kwargs) # FAILS

Because you pass the variable 'y' into the function twice: once as kwargs and once as function declaration.

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