I would like to ask you some tips about this java scenario: I have a simple interface called Sequence that performs some basic operation. Now I would like to implement some additional methods in a separate class, called SequenceWrapper, that implements the Sequence defined above. Here is some example code that looks like my real code:

public interface Sequence {       
    public void methodOne();
    public int methodTwo();
}

public abstract class SequenceWrapper implements Sequence {
    private wrappedSequence = null;

    public SequenceWrapper(Sequence sequence){
        this.wrappedSequence = sequence;
    }

    public void methodOne(){
        wrappedSequence.methodOne();
    }

    public int methodTwo(){
        return wrappedSequence.methodTwo();
    }
}

public class ConcreteWrapper extends SequenceWrapper {
    public ConcreteWrapper(Sequence sequence){
         super(sequence);
    }

    // Just an example
    public int addMethodOne(){
         int a = super.methodTwo();
         return a + 3;
    }        
}

Now if I want to implements a class with another method (say 'addMethodTwo()') I can simply extends the 'ConcreteWrapper' class and add only the new method:

public class ConcreteWrapperTwo extends ConcreteWrapper {
    public ConcreteWrapperTwo(Sequence sequence){
         super(sequence);
    }

    public int addMethodTwo(){
         int a = super.methodTwo();
         return a + 30;
    }
}

What do you think? Is this code correct or it's preferable another strategy??

Thanks in advance

  • While I basically agree with Carlos Robles' answer, what you are describing there just seems to be the Decorator Pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern - which has its justification, but it should (like all patterns) be verified that it really fits the particular application case – Marco13 Feb 14 '14 at 11:31
  • yeah, @Marco13, i agree with that, if you look at the comments in my answer i also mentioned it, but probably it is harder to achieve, and as you say, first it have to be checked if it actually fits the current case. – Carlos Robles Feb 14 '14 at 11:54
  • @Carlos Robles Yes, I noticed that you mentioned it, but wanted to add this link here for the case that the asker (or others reading the question) did not know that "decorator pattern" is a particular, well known pattern, and that this keyword can be used to find quite some resources on the web showing its advantages/drawbacks and possible use-cases. – Marco13 Feb 14 '14 at 11:59
  • @Marco13 yes, that`s useful! – Carlos Robles Feb 14 '14 at 12:04
  • As far as I know this is not a "standard" Decorator pattern and my case does not fit with the decorator pattern cases (I need to add new functionality to a class and not to "expand" the functionalities of the decorated class, like the Coffee Milk scenario) – Giovanni Feb 14 '14 at 12:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • First, your private wrappedSequence = null; has no type. I suppose you meant private Sequence wrappedSequence = null;

  • Second, in your example you will never be able to instantiate any of the classes, since all of them receive another Sequence in the constructor and there is no way of create the first instance of Sequence.

  • Third, composition over inheritance is a good approach, if you really need it. Usually you wrap an object when you need to hide or protect the access to the wrapped object. In your case, within the wrapper you are exposing all of the methods of the wrapped object. You then create new methods that will affect the wrapper object, but not the wrapped one.

What you probably need is just a normal inheritance scenario:

I would like to walk you through you a breakdown for this Java scenario: I have a simple interface called Sequence that performs some basic operation. Now I would like to implement some additional methods in a separate class, called SequenceWrapper that implements the Sequence as defined above. Here is some example code to explain what I mean:

public interface Sequence {
    public void methodOne();
    public int methodTwo();
}

public abstract class AbstractSequence  implements Sequence {


    public SequenceWrapper( ){  }

    public void methodOne(){
        //basic behavior here
    }

    public int methodTwo(){
         //basic behavior here

    }
}

public class ConcreteSequence extends AbstractSequence {
    public ConcreteSequence ( ){
         super( );
    }

    // Just an example
    public int addMethodOne(){
         int a =  methodTwo();
         return a + 3;
    }        
}


public class ConcreteSequenceTwo extends AbstractSequence {
    public ConcreteSequenceTwo( ){
         super( );
    }

    public int addMethodTwo(){
         int a =  methodTwo();
         return a + 30;
    }
}
  • Hi Carlos and thank you for your rapid response! I have already implemented some concrete Sequence classes but I haven't reported them in the example (sorry my fault!). I wouldn't like to implement an inheritance scenario because I would like to keep the implementation of sequence separated from the rest of the code (I have some compressed Sequence classes that are "slower" than other Sequence classes but they need less memory) – Giovanni Feb 14 '14 at 11:16
  • Anyways, you that don't means you need a wrapper, you can achieve the same with a correct inheritance. at any range, if you fix my first point, and the second one is already fixed, and you think that you actually need a wrapper, you can perfectly use it, since is one of the common and easier aproachs (easier than strategy or decorator patterns). Any preference from here is mostly opinion-based – Carlos Robles Feb 14 '14 at 11:23
  • I thought to use strategy pattern but I need my Context class to be an instance of the Strategy class: my WrappedSequence has to be a Sequence, becouse I have some reader and writer that uses Sequence as input and output. – Giovanni Feb 14 '14 at 11:38

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