16

I've started to learn some C# and I came accross a troubling matter: the virtual methods. Is there any motivation for such keyword to be necessary?

A simple polymorphism in Java does not requre virtual keyword to work, even the Override adnotations are optional:

package figures;

public class Figures {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Figure figure = new Figure();
        Circle circle = new Circle();
        Triangle triangle = new Triangle();
        Figure []arrayOfFigures = {figure, circle, triangle};
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++){
            arrayOfFigures[i].introduceYourself();
        }
    }
}

class Figure {
    public void introduceYourself(){
        System.out.println("I am just a figure.");
    }
}

class Circle extends Figure {
    @Override
    public void introduceYourself() {
        System.out.println("I am a circle.");
    }
}

class Triangle extends Figure {
    @Override
    public void introduceYourself() {
        System.out.println("I am a triangle.");
    }
}

While in C# the same example requires both virtual and override keywords to work:

namespace Figures
{
    class Figures
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Figure figure = new Figure();
            Circle circle = new Circle();
            Triangle triangle = new Triangle();
            Figure[] arrayOfFigures = { figure, circle, triangle };
            for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            {
                arrayOfFigures[i].IntroduceYourself();
            }
        }
    }
}

    class Figure
    {
        public virtual void IntroduceYourself()
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("I am just a simple figure.");
        }
    }

    class Circle : Figure
    {
        public override void IntroduceYourself()
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("I am a circle.");
        }
    }

    class Triangle : Figure
    {
        public override void IntroduceYourself()
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("I am a triangle.");
        }
    }

Usually there is a motivation to introduce some keywords to languages. As C# was created after Java and many other object oriented languages, I Wonder if there was a reason to introduce obligatory (for polymorphism to work) virtual and override keywords?

14
  • In Java, all methods are virtual by default, that's why you don't need them there. Feb 14, 2014 at 16:15
  • Then why is it not the same in C#? Of course, different language - different rules, but for a new language there should be some motivation behind it, I thought.
    – 3yakuya
    Feb 14, 2014 at 16:16
  • I'd guess because it's a performance hit to call methods through a vtable, so methods that can be overridden should be explicitly marked as such.. Feb 14, 2014 at 16:16
  • 1
    @Byakuya By writing a Java class with the inverse modifiers on methods - anything not marked virtual in C# would have no modifier in Java, anything marked final in Java would have no modifier in C#. Feb 14, 2014 at 16:40
  • 1

1 Answer 1

20

In Java, methods are virtual by default. In C#, they are not, and must be marked as virtual in order for polymorphism to work.

It's a difference in philosophy. Java's philosophy is that a virtual-by-default approach makes it easy for you to extend classes at-will. C#, on the other hand, figures that you should only have virtual functions when you explicitly say you need them (so a function can be overriden only if explicitly allowed to.) There's a slight performance consideration, since a virtual function requires an additional level of indirection.

2
  • 1
    What @3yakuya is asking is why C#, a newer language than Java, bothers us with the requirement of using the virtual keyword. The scenario where maybe you will want to invoke a father's method version instead of child's one, when the instance is declared as father, and instanced as child, is really very rare in real world applications. That's why Java implements polymorphism from scratch, with no requirement to use any keyword to do it. Oct 31, 2019 at 12:09
  • 2
    My point is that C# was created by people coming from Borland, and they used a lot of principles from Object Pascal, as they created previously Borland Delphi. Object Pascal had the same requirement with the virtual keyword, and more or less the same use of the virtual method table. Oct 31, 2019 at 12:11

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