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In C++11, how can I specialise a function template which is declared with a "complicated" trailing return type using decltype? The following works in GCC but produces "error C2912: explicit specialisation 'int f(void)' i s not a specialisation of a function template" in VC2013:

#include <iostream>

int myint() { return 1; }

template<class T>
auto f() -> decltype(myint()) // this seems to cause problems
{
    std::cout << "general\n";
    return 1;
}

template <>
auto f<double>() -> decltype(myint())
{
    std::cout << "special\n";
    return 2;
}

int main()
{
    f<int>();
    f<double>(); // compiler error in VC, but not in GCC
}

I say "complicated" in lack of a technically precise word because I'm not sure what makes the difference. For example, the following decltype, using a built-in operation not depending on any function result type, works fine with template specialisation:

auto f() -> decltype(1 + 1)

So, my questions (all related to each other):

  1. Is my code correct C++11?
  2. Is this a VC bug?
  3. How could I ever specialise std::begin and std::end (and thus provide range-based for loops) for an unchangeable legacy container class if this kind of specialization does not work?
5

Is my code correct C++11?

Looks correct to me. Also, compiles cleanly both with gcc and clang with -Wall -Wextra.

Is this a VC bug?

Most likely. VC is infamous in this respect, see for example What exactly is "broken" with Microsoft Visual C++'s two-phase template instantiation? or google msvc two-phase lookup.

How could I ever specialise std::begin and std::end (and thus provide range-based for loops) for an unchangeable legacy container class if this kind of specialization does not work?

For the code you provided, a workaround would be to use a typedef:

#include <iostream>

int myint() { return 1; }

typedef decltype(myint()) return_type;

template<class T>
return_type f()
{
    std::cout << "general\n";
    return 1;
}

template <>
return_type f<double>()
{
    std::cout << "special\n";
    return 2;
}

int main()
{
    f<int>();
    f<double>();
}

All three mainstream compilers (gcc, clang, vs) seem to be happy with this code.


UPDATE:

How could I ever specialise std::begin and std::end (and thus provide range-based for loops) for an unchangeable legacy container class if this kind of specialization does not work?
[And from the comments:] I thought specialising std::begin and std::end was always the best approach.

After giving it some thought, specializing std::begin() and std::end() would be my last resort. My first attempt would be to provide member begin() and end() functions; unfortunately, it is not an option for you because you cannot modify the corresponding code. Then, my second attempt would be to provide free functions in my own namespace:

#include <iostream>
#include <initializer_list>
#include <vector>

namespace my_namespace {

template <typename T> class my_container;
template <typename T> T* begin(my_container<T>& c);
template <typename T> T* end(my_container<T>& c);

template <typename T>
class my_container {

  public:

    explicit my_container(std::initializer_list<T> list) : v(list) { }

    friend T* begin<>(my_container& c);
    friend T* end<>(my_container& c);

  private:

    std::vector<T> v;
};

template <typename T>
T* begin(my_container<T>& c) {

  return c.v.data();
}

template <typename T>
T* end(my_container<T>& c) {

  return c.v.data()+c.v.size();
}

}

int main() {

  my_namespace::my_container<int> c{1, 2, 3};

  for (int i : c)
    std::cout << i << '\n';
}

This approach must work if you were able to specialize std::begin() and std::end() for the container. It also works if you do it in the global namespace (that is, you simply omit the namespace my_namespace { and closing }) but I prefer to put my implementation into my own namespace.

See also

  • Thanks for the typedef trick, that was definitely new to me! I am still trying to understand what's really idiomatic in C++11 regarding std::begin et al. Perhaps if my main concern is to provide range-based for loops, I should not care too much about std::begin/std::end and just provide free-standing non-std begin/end functions? – Christian Hackl Feb 15 '14 at 16:45
  • @ChristianHackl The free-standing std::begin() and std::end() are handy for old C style arrays (for example int v[42];). If you want to make your old containers work with the new range-based for loops, just provide my_container.begin() and my_container.end() member functions. Assuming you can change the old containers, but you write unchangable... Hmm. Alternatively, you could define views for those old containers, that doesn't require changing the old code. In any case, if a simple typedef suffices, I would go with the typedef. – Ali Feb 15 '14 at 16:59
  • I was thinking about something along the same lines... LegacyContainerLoopAdapter wrapping LegacyContainer with begin()/end() member functions. But then, of course, std::begin/std::end also seem to be handy as basic operations for higher-level generalised ones (e.g. something like bool empty(T const &c) { return std::begin(c) == std::end(c); }). That is why I thought specialising std::begin and std::end was always the best approach. – Christian Hackl Feb 16 '14 at 10:38
  • @ChristianHackl Please check my update. As it turns out, there is no need to specialize std::begin() and std::end(), nor is it necessary to provide a LegacyContainerLoopAdapter. – Ali Feb 16 '14 at 13:01

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