This question already has an answer here:

def merge2(iter1,iter2):
    """ on input iter1, iter2, two non-empty sorted iterators, not 
    necessarily infinite, produces the sorted merge of the two iterators """

    left=next(iter1)
    right=next(iter2)
    while True:
        if left<right:
            yield(left)
            try:
                left=next(iter1)
            except StopIteration:  # iter1 is exhausted
                yield(right)          # in my question I refer to this yield
                for right in iter2:
                    yield(right)
                break                    
        else:
            yield(right)
            try:
                right=next(iter2)
            except StopIteration:  # iter2 is exhausted
                yield(left)
                for left in iter1:
                    yield(left)
                break

after using the yield(right) (which I indicated above), hasn't the program provided the value so I'm now "out" of the merge2 function, so how the for (that is immediately below) is reached?

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, hivert, Blckknght, Lukas Graf, fiction Feb 15 '14 at 12:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • yield is not the same as return. The generator is paused and when control returns (generator.next() is called), control resumes. – Martijn Pieters Feb 15 '14 at 12:03
  • how are you using this generator function? – M4rtini Feb 15 '14 at 12:04
  • see the highest voted answer with python tag. – Priyank Patel Feb 15 '14 at 12:05
up vote 4 down vote accepted

yield returns the control to the caller scope (function or method), as would return - but instead of destroying the current scope, with the local variables and its values, it is kept.

When the "next" method of the iterator is called again (which the for statement does implicitly), the scope where the yield was executed is retrieved, and execution continue from that point on, with the same variables in place.

Actually, yield behaves as an expression, and if instead of calling the next method, the outer function calls send instead, the value passed to send is the value returned by the yield expression.

(This information about the code object, local and global variables, which line is being run is kept in a "stack frame" object, and in Python it can be even addressed as any other object and introspected)

  • @ jsbueno can i give up on :for right in iter2: yield(right) break? because yield already provided the needed value – user7777777 Feb 15 '14 at 12:27

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