24

I don't understand what is going on here. How should I feed gsub to get the string "Yaho\'o"?

>> "Yaho'o".gsub("Y", "\\Y")
=> "\\Yaho'o"
>> "Yaho'o".gsub("'", "\\'")
=> "Yahooo"
  • 1
    This is one of the weirder things I've seen. – Ian Macalinao Oct 19 '15 at 15:42
28

\' means $' which is everything after the match. Escape the \ again and it works

"Yaho'o".gsub("'", "\\\\'")
  • 5
    ruby 1.9.3 "Yaho'o".gsub("'", "\\\\'") => "Yaho\\'o" – Adrien Schuler Feb 19 '13 at 12:55
  • 1
    Doesn't WORK.... See above comment – theSociableme Aug 8 '13 at 14:55
  • 3
    @AdrienSchuler It does work, IRB displays a double backslash so you can see that it's escaped. "Yaho'o".gsub("'", "\\\\'").length => 7 – Stephen Jennings Nov 25 '14 at 21:26
  • 3
    Where is this documented? – Ian Macalinao Oct 19 '15 at 15:46
2
"Yaho'o".gsub("'", "\\\\'")

Because you're escaping the escape character as well as escaping the single quote.

1

This will also do it, and it's a bit more readable:

def escape_single_quotes(str)
  str.gsub(/'/) { |x| "\\#{x}" }
end

If you want to escape both a single-quote and a backslash, so that you can embed that string in a double-quoted ruby string, then the following will do that for you:

def escape_single_quotes_and_backslash(str)
  str.gsub(/\\|'/) { |x| "\\#{x}" }
end
  • I used the top one, and it worked perfectly. exactly what I needed. – nfriend21 Sep 22 '16 at 14:44

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