34

I am re-implementing a request logger as Owin Middleware which logs the request url and body of all incoming requests. I am able to read the body, but if I do the body parameter in my controller is null.

I'm guessing it's null because the stream position is at the end so there is nothing left to read when it tries to deserialize the body. I had a similar issue in a previous version of Web API but was able to set the Stream position back to 0. This particular stream throws a This stream does not support seek operations exception.

In the most recent version of Web API 2.0 I could call Request.HttpContent.ReadAsStringAsync()inside my request logger, and the body would still arrive to the controller in tact.

How can I rewind the stream after reading it?

or

How can I read the request body without consuming it?

public class RequestLoggerMiddleware : OwinMiddleware
{
    public RequestLoggerMiddleware(OwinMiddleware next)
        : base(next)
    {
    }

    public override Task Invoke(IOwinContext context)
    {
        return Task.Run(() => {
            string body = new StreamReader(context.Request.Body).ReadToEnd();
            // log body

            context.Request.Body.Position = 0; // cannot set stream position back to 0
            Console.WriteLine(context.Request.Body.CanSeek); // prints false
            this.Next.Invoke(context);
        });
    }
}

public class SampleController : ApiController 
{
    public void Post(ModelClass body)
    {
        // body is now null if the middleware reads it
    }
}

3 Answers 3

41

Just found one solution. Replacing the original stream with a new stream containing the data.

    public override async Task Invoke(IOwinContext context)
    {
        return Task.Run(() => {
            string body = new StreamReader(context.Request.Body).ReadToEnd();
            // log body

            byte[] requestData = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(body);
            context.Request.Body = new MemoryStream(requestData);
            await this.Next.Invoke(context);
        });
    }

If you are dealing with larger amounts of data, I'm sure a FileStream would also work as the replacement.

6
  • 5
    Another alternative: Stream anotherStream = new MemoryStream(); context.Request.Body.CopyToAsync(anotherStream); Nov 17, 2014 at 15:05
  • 13
    In ASP.NET Core (where the invoke method would have the following signature async Task Invoke(HttpContext context)) you can do the following to get a buffered stream which allows you to seek and read it multiple times; context.Request.EnableRewind() (HttpRequest extension method found in Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.Internal.BufferingHelper).
    – jfiskvik
    Jul 13, 2016 at 14:25
  • @jfiskvik Your input was extremely helpful for me, It helped me rewind my stream after some processing that happened in my MiddleWare Nov 2, 2016 at 15:51
  • When using .NET Core 3.1 (and up) you can use context.Request.EnableBuffering() (instead of context.Request.EnableRewind() per the answer of @jfiskvik) found in Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http. This enables me to reset the body like so: context.Request.Body.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);.
    – Aage
    May 17, 2021 at 7:48
  • 1
    WARNING: This answer is dangerous: - The Task result from Next.Invoke() is not used (or awaited) - Task.Run will run the continuation in a thread-pool thread - no SynchronizationContext and so HttpContext.Current will not be set correctly. Under load, this code will do BAD things.
    – eddiewould
    Aug 9, 2021 at 4:42
12

Here's a small improvement to the first answer by Despertar, which helped me a lot, but I ran into an issue when working with binary data. The intermediate step of extracting the stream into a string and then putting it back into a byte array using Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(body) messes up the binary content (the contents will change unless it is an UTF8 encoded string). Here's my fix using Stream.CopyTo():

    public override async Task Invoke(IOwinContext context)
    {
        // read out body (wait for all bytes)
        using (var streamCopy = new MemoryStream())
        {
            context.Request.Body.CopyTo(streamCopy);
            streamCopy.Position = 0; // rewind

            string body = new StreamReader(streamCopy).ReadToEnd();
            // log body

            streamCopy.Position = 0; // rewind again
            context.Request.Body = streamCopy; // put back in place for downstream handlers

            await this.Next.Invoke(context);
        }
    }

Also, MemoryStream is nice because you can check the stream's length before logging the full body (which is something I don't want to do in case someone uploads a huge file).

2
  • I have tried this code, but it is throwing an excepting when I tried to read the second time.
    – Ravikumar
    Jun 8, 2018 at 7:31
  • On which line does the exception occur?
    – Efrain
    Jun 11, 2018 at 15:29
-3

I know this is old, but just to help anyone that comes across this. You need to seek on the stream: context.Request.Body.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

1
  • 4
    Same as Body.Position = 0, this throws a NotSupportedException with the message This stream does not support seek operations. Also the Body.CanSeek property returns false.
    – Despertar
    Aug 23, 2014 at 22:18

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