I am trying to write a simple program that reads a line from standard input, reverses it, and then prints the reversed string.

Unfortunately the native getLine function reads a Costring; I can only reverse Strings; and there is no function that takes a Costring to a String.

How can I amend this program to compile?

module EchoInputReverse where

-- Agda standard library 0.7
open import Data.List using (reverse)
open import Data.String
open import Foreign.Haskell using (Unit)
open import IO.Primitive

postulate
  getLine : IO Costring

{-# COMPILED getLine getLine #-}

main : IO Unit
main = 
  getLine >>= (λ s → 
  -- NOTE: Need a (toString : Costring → String) here. Or some other strategy.
  return (toCostring (fromList (reverse (toList (toString s))))) >>= (λ s' → 
  putStrLn s'))

You can't do that, at least not directly. The problem is that Costring can be infinite in size, while Strings must be finite.

Imagine running the program as prog < /dev/zero, what should happen? The reverse function can produce the first element only after reaching the end of the input list and that may never happen.

We need to express the fact that converting a Costring to String can fail. One way to do it is to use the partiality monad. Let's take a look at the definition:

data _⊥ {a} (A : Set a) : Set a where
  now   : (x : A) → A ⊥
  later : (x : ∞ (A ⊥)) → A ⊥

So, we can either have a value of type A right now, or we need to wait for later. But notice the symbol: that means we can actually wait forever (as in there can be infinite number of later constructors).

I'll merge the conversion and reversing into one function. Imports first:

open import Category.Monad.Partiality
open import Coinduction
open import Data.Char
open import Data.Colist
  using ([]; _∷_)
open import Data.List
  using ([]; _∷_; List)
open import Data.String
open import Data.Unit
open import IO

Now, the type of our reverse function should mention that we take a Costring as an input but also that returning a String may fail. The implementation is then fairly simple, it's the usual reverse with accumulator:

reverse : Costring → String ⊥
reverse = go []
  where
  go : List Char → Costring → String ⊥
  go acc []       = now (fromList acc)
  go acc (x ∷ xs) = later (♯ go (x ∷ acc) (♭ xs))

However, we can print a String, but not String ⊥! That's where IO helps: we can interpret the later constructors as "do nothing" and if we find now constructor, we can putStrLn the String it contains.

putStrLn⊥ : String ⊥ → IO ⊤
putStrLn⊥ (now   s) = putStrLn s
putStrLn⊥ (later s) = ♯ return tt >> ♯ putStrLn⊥ (♭ s)

Notice that I use the IO from IO module, not the one from IO.Primitive. This is basically a layer built on the postulates, so it's a bit nicer. But if you want to use getLine with this, you have to write:

import IO.Primitive as Prim

postulate
  primGetLine : Prim.IO Costring

{-# COMPILED primGetLine getLine #-}

getLine : IO Costring
getLine = lift primGetLine

And finally, we can write the main function:

main = run (♯ getLine >>= λ c → ♯ putStrLn⊥ (reverse c))

Compiling this program using C-c C-x C-c and then running it, we get the expected:

$ cat test
hello world
$ prog < test    
dlrow olleh
  • 2
    This approach involves quite a lot of type gymnastics. Does it buy you much over just asserting (technically incorrectly) that getLine : IO String? – David Foster Feb 16 '14 at 18:47
  • 3
    Well, it gives you precise types, which is fairly important in languages such as Agda. But other than that, no. By the way, there's also readFiniteFile, which is also "postulated" with a wrong type, but unlike getLine, it can actually tell you when it doesn't work (it raises exception when given non-physical files). – Vitus Feb 16 '14 at 20:25
  • 1
    > putStrLn⊥ (later s) = ♯ return tt >> ♯ putStrLn⊥ (♭ s) (1) Why the ♯ return tt? This appears to return a and immediately discards it. (2) In ♯ putStrLn⊥ (♭ s) does the "force" the execution of s? (3) Since this is recursing on the right side, I don't see how this computation will terminate. – David Foster Feb 17 '14 at 22:24
  • The ♯ return tt is there so that the corecursion is still productive. When you define a value in this way (that is, using corecursion), the termination checker will make sure you are introducing at least one constructor before recursing. The doesn't force execution in this sense, it's more like evaluation of the outermost constructor (but yes, is called delay and is called force). Other way to think about it is that creates "lazy" values and evaluates them. – Vitus Feb 17 '14 at 23:10
  • 1
    Also, as for precise types, let me make a comparison. If you define n : ℕ, you not only state that n is of type , but also that its evaluation will finish in finite amout of time; if you define it as n : ℕ ⊥, you still state that there's something of type , but you now acknowledge that its computation might not finish. Postulating getLine : IO String feels like using {-# NO_TERMINATION_CHECK #-} and pretending it really terminates. – Vitus Feb 17 '14 at 23:20

Saizan on #agda points out that one could just postulate that getLine : IO String instead of getLine : IO Costring. This works. So you get:

module EchoInputReverse where

-- Agda standard library 0.7
open import Data.List using (reverse)
open import Data.String
open import Foreign.Haskell using (Unit)
open import IO.Primitive

postulate
  getLine : IO String

{-# COMPILED getLine getLine #-}

main : IO Unit
main = 
  getLine >>= (λ s → 
  return (toCostring (fromList (reverse (toList s)))) >>= (λ s' → 
  putStrLn s'))

The downside is that this approach asserts that getLine always returns a finite string, which may not be correct in the case of prog < /dev/zero as @Vitus points out.

But I don't think this matters. If getLine does in fact returns an infinite string then neither this solution nor @Vitus's solution will yield a program that terminates. They have equivalent behavior.

It would be ideal to detect whether the input was infinite and yield an error in that case. But this kind of infinity detection on IO is not possible in general.

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