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We have a directed graph G = (V, E) for a comm. network with each edge having a probability of not failing r(u, v) (defined as edge weight) which lies in interval [0, 1]. The probabilities are independent, so that from one vertex to another, if we multiply all probabilities, we get the the probability of the entire path not failing.

I need an efficient algorithm to find a most reliable path from one given vertex to another given vertex (i.e., a path from the first vertex to the second that is least likely to fail). I am given that log(r · s) = log r + log s will be helpful.

This is what I have so far -:

DIJKSTRA-VARIANT (G, s, t)
for v in V:
    val[v] ← ∞
A ← ∅
Q ← V to initialize Q with vertices in V.
val[s] ← 0
while Q is not ∅ and t is not in A
    do x ← EXTRACT-MIN (Q)
    A ← A ∪ {x}
    for each vertex y ∈ Adj[x]
        do if val[x] + p(x, y) < val[y]:
           val[y] = val[x] + p(x, y)

s is the source vertex and t is the destination vertex. Of course, I have not exploited the log property as I am not able to understand how to use it. The relaxation portion of the algorithm at the bottom needs to be modified, and the val array will capture the results. Without log, it would probably be storing the next highest probability. How should I modify the algorithm to use log?

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    How well do you understand Dijkstra? Do you know what problem it solves? Do you see the difference between that problem and the one you've been given? Now do you see how the log property might be useful?
    – Beta
    Feb 16, 2014 at 8:04
  • 1. "How well do you understand Dijkstra?" - A bit. 2. "Do you know what problem it solves?" - It solves the problem of finding the shortest paths for a single source. 3. "What is the difference between the problems?" - Edge weights are probabilities in the range [0, 1]. To find a most reliable path from one vertex to another, I must multiply probabilities and get the highest for a path. 4. "Do you see how log could be used?" - It is this that I fail to understand.
    – PritishC
    Feb 16, 2014 at 8:07
  • Oh wait...since I must multiply probabilities, should I be using log to maintain a summation?
    – PritishC
    Feb 16, 2014 at 8:09

3 Answers 3

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Right now, your code has

do if val[x] + p(x, y) < val[y]:
    val[y] = val[x] + p(x, y)

Since the edge weights in this case represent probabilities, you need to multiply them together (rather than adding):

do if val[x] * p(x, y) > val[y]:
    val[y] = val[x] * p(x, y)

I've changed the sign to >, since you want the probability to be as large as possible.

Logs are helpful because (1) log(xy) = log(x) + log(y) (as you said) and sums are easier to compute than products, and (2) log(x) is a monotonic function of x, so log(x) and x have their maximum in the same place. Therefore, you can deal with the logarithm of the probability, instead of the probability itself:

do if log_val[x] + log(p(x, y)) > log_val[y]:
    log_val[y] = log_val[x] + log(p(x, y))

Edited to add (since I don't have enough rep to leave a comment): you'll want to initialize your val array to 0, rather than Infinity, because you're calculating a maximum instead of a minimum. (Since you want the largest probability of not failing.) So, after log transforming, the initial log_val array values should be -Infinity.

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  • For the sake of convenience, I can use -Infinity in the algorithm then?
    – PritishC
    Feb 16, 2014 at 8:56
  • 1
    Yep -- just change the initial val[v] = -Infinity, use log(p(x,y)) in place of p(x,y), and change the < to a > and you should be good to go. And, I think I may have just done your homework assignment for you, but oh well :)
    – tinybike
    Feb 16, 2014 at 8:59
  • Well, at least I tried, unlike most other people. I believe val[s] should be 1, and on applying log I would get a 0. I say 1 because vertex s is already in the bag, and 1 represents the highest probability possible. It is analogous to 0 in a normal implementation of Dijkstra.
    – PritishC
    Feb 16, 2014 at 9:02
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    Btw, the one thing I didn't tell you is what val[s] should be! I will leave that as an exercise for you.
    – tinybike
    Feb 16, 2014 at 9:03
  • This is very late, but will the above solution work when there are cycles? Jul 25, 2017 at 15:45
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In order to calculate probabilities you should multiply (instead of add) in the relaxation phase, which means changing:

do if val[x] + p(x, y) < val[y]:
           val[y] = val[x] + p(x, y)

to:

do if val[x] * p(x, y) < val[y]:
           val[y] = val[x] * p(x, y)

Using the Log is possible if the range is (0,1] since log(0) = -infinity and log(1) = 0, it means that for every x,y in (0,1]:
probability x < probability y than:
log(x) < log(y).
Since we are maintaining the same relation (between probabilities) this modification will provide the correct answer.

I think you'll be able to take it from here.

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1

I think I may have solved the question partially.

Here is my attempt. Edits and pointers are welcome -:

DIJKSTRA-VARIANT (G, s, t)
for v in V:
    val[v] ← 0
A ← ∅
Q ← V to initialize Q with vertices in V.
val[s] ← 1
while Q is not ∅ and t is not in A
    do x ← EXTRACT-MAX (Q)
    A ← A ∪ {x}
    for each vertex y ∈ Adj[x]
        do if log(val[x]) + log(p(x, y)) > log(val[y]):
           log(val[y]) = log(val[x]) + log(p(x, y))

Since I am to find the highest possible probability values, I believe I should be using >. The following questions remain -:

  1. What should the initial values in the val array be?

  2. Is there anything else I need to add?

EDIT: I have changed the initial val values to 0. However, log is undefined at 0. I am open to a better alternative. Also, I changed the priority queue's method to EXTRACT-MAX since it is the larger probabilities that need to be extracted. This would ideally be implemented on a binary max-heap.

FURTHER EDIT: I have marked tinybike's answer as accepted, since they have posted most of the necessary details that I require. The algorithm should be as I have posted here.

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