19

I'm trying to work my way into understanding type-programming in Scala, and I've found that most of what one needs to know about type programming has an analogous counterpart in value programming as is reflected in the type-level programming wiki page. However, I've not found the analogy for the this key word or self-types. I suspect maybe it doesn't make sense to expect such a thing, but I thought I would ask.

For instance, I can write the following to represent Booleans as values at run time:

sealed trait BoolVal {
  def not:BoolVal
  def or(that:BoolVal):BoolVal
  def and(that:BoolVal) =
    (this.not or that.not).not
  def imp(that:BoolVal) =
    this.not or that
}
case object TrueVal extends BoolVal {
  override val not = FalseVal
  override def or(that:BoolVal) = TrueVal
}
case object FalseVal extends BoolVal {
  override val not = TrueVal
  override def or(that:BoolVal) = that
}

Here my and and imp are able to take advantage of the fact it doesn't matter if I am a false object or a true object to be defined correctly. My TrueVal and FalseVal objects can inherit the same code.

I can make the analogous type-level programming constructs, but I don't understand how to define And and Imp in my base trait.

sealed trait BoolType {
  type Not <: BoolType
  type Or[That <: BoolType] <: BoolType
  type And[That <: BoolType] = ???
  type Imp[That <: BoolType] = ???
}
sealed trait TrueType extends BoolType {
  override type Not = FalseType
  override type Or[That <: BoolType] = TrueType
}
sealed trait FalseType extends BoolType {
  override type Not = TrueType
  override type Or[That <: BoolType] = That
}

I can see where perhaps it doesn't make sense that my types inherit types, but the certainly inherit abstract types. Is there a way to define And and Impl in my BoolType, or do I have to define each in the respective TrueType and FalseType traits?

3 Answers 3

10

You can always define an abstract type on your boolean base type as follows:

trait MyBool extends BoolType{
  type This <: BoolType
}

trait TrueType extends BoolType{
  type This = TrueType
}

and you should be good to go with a reference to yourself. Then you can use DeMorgan's Laws to do the following

 !(x && y) == (!x || !y)

Then by a double negative you can get you And condition going:

 !(!x || !y) == !!(x && y) == (x && y)
4
  • 2
    DeMorgan's is exactly what I am shooting for like in my BoolVal trait. But... I tried your suggesting, but it but it didn't compile. In particular, the definitions for And and Imp didn't compile: type And[That <: BoolType] = This.Not.Or[That.Not].Not and type Imp[That <: BoolType] = This.Not.Or[That]
    – joescii
    Feb 17, 2014 at 5:01
  • Don't use This.Not I would try using This#Not. You're working at the type level, now.
    – wheaties
    Feb 17, 2014 at 5:02
  • #FacePalm #MidnightPilotError #BeerThirty
    – joescii
    Feb 17, 2014 at 5:05
  • And for good measure, I used protected on my This types. Thanks a million! I'm writing a blog post with what I've learned. I'll post it back here. Would love your feedback if you have time.
    – joescii
    Feb 17, 2014 at 5:11
9

I would suggest using self, example of your blog post adjusted:

sealed trait BoolType { self =>
  type Not <: BoolType
  type Or[That <: BoolType] <: BoolType
  type And[That <: BoolType] = self.type#Not#Or[That#Not]#Not
  type Imp[That <: BoolType] = self.type#Not#Or[That]
}
sealed trait TrueType extends BoolType {
  override type Not = FalseType
  override type Or[That <: BoolType] = TrueType
}
sealed trait FalseType extends BoolType {
  override type Not = TrueType
  override type Or[That <: BoolType] = That
}
1
  • I like this approach, arguably more than creating a This type, since it keeps stuff from leaking out. I'll definitely make this change moving forward and note it in the follow up post. Thanks!
    – joescii
    Feb 19, 2014 at 3:34
3

Why not just use the this keyword? When i explored type level programming myself, i could not see a difference when using this instead of self.

sealed trait BoolType {
  type Not <: BoolType 
  type Or[That <: BoolType] <: BoolType
  type And[That <: BoolType] = this.type#Not#Or[That#Not]#Not
  type Imp[That <: BoolType] = this.type#Not#Or[That]
}
5
  • I agree with you. In fact, once I compiled my excursion into an article, I chose this exact approach (no pun intended)
    – joescii
    Nov 17, 2014 at 11:07
  • 1
    I recently stumbled upon your great blog series about that topic. I will give an introduction talk to type level programming at a local meetup. Your series serve as an example. So thanks for the great work!
    – mavilein
    Nov 17, 2014 at 11:35
  • Fantastic! I hope it goes well! Don't hesitate to contact me if you need any additional help.
    – joescii
    Nov 17, 2014 at 11:39
  • This begs the question: What exactly is the difference between using this and a self type annotation? I know that you can express dependencies with the self type (self: TraitToMixIn), but that isn't needed here, so why else might one prefer to use self type to this? @joescii, have you formed an opinion by now? May 17, 2015 at 11:13
  • @stewSquared There should be no difference (compiler weirdness might cause it though), the reason I use self instead of this is because all content that can be googled refers to it as a self type. And when you do add dependencies using the self type, the self is richer than this.
    – EECOLOR
    Aug 11, 2015 at 11:12

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