2

I'm trying to populate an array of structures from C++ and pass the result back to C#.

I thought maybe creating a struct with an array of structures maybe the way forward as most examples I have come across use structures(but passing basic types). I have tried the following but no luck so far.

Found an example at: http://limbioliong.wordpress.com/2011/08/20/passing-a-pointer-to-a-structure-from-c-to-c-part-2/?relatedposts_exclude=542

I have the following in C#

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
namespace CSharpDLLCall
{
  class Program
  {

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential,Pack=8)]
public struct Struct1
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
    public double[] d1;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
    public double[] d2;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct TestStructOuter
{
     public int length;
     public IntPtr embedded;
}

 static void Main(string[] args)
 {
    Program program = new Program();
    program.demoArrayOfStructs();
 }

public void demoArrayOfStructs() 
{
    TestStructOuter outer = new TestStructOuter();
    testStructOuter.embedded = new Struct1[10];
    outer.length = 10;
    outer.embedded = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Struct1)) * 10);
    Marshal.StructureToPtr(outer, outer.embedded, false);
    testAPI2(ref outer);
    outer = (TestStructOuter)(Marshal.PtrToStructure(outer.embedded, typeof(TestStructOuter)));
    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(outer.embedded);
 }

[DllImport(@"C:\CPP_Projects\DLL\DLLSample\Release\DLLSample.dll")]
static extern void testAPI2(IntPtr pTestStructOuter);
}
}

In C++ in the header i have

#ifdef DLLSAMPLE_EXPORTS
#define DLLSAMPLE_API __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define DLLSAMPLE_API __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#pragma pack(1)
struct struct1
{
    double d1[];
    double d2[];
};

struct TestStructOuter
{
    struct1* embedded;
};

extern "C"
{   
    DLLSAMPLE_API void __stdcall testAPI2(TestStructOuter* pTestStructOuter);
}

In the cpp I have:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "DLLSample.h"

__declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall testAPI2(TestStructOuter* pTestStructOuter)
{
    // not sure that this is necessary
    // for (int i = 0; i < 10 ; ++i)
    // {    
    //     pTestStructOuter->embedded = new struct1;        
    // }

    for (int i = 0; i < 10 ; ++i)
    {
            struct1 s1;

            for (int idx = 0; idx < 10; ++idx)
            {
                    s1.d1[i] = i+0.5;
                    s1.d2[i] = i+0.5;
            }

            pTestStructOuter->embedded[0] = s1;
    }
}

This doesn't seem to work the error i get: The parameter is incorrect.(Exception from HRESULT:0x80070057 (E_INVALIDARG))

Which probably means that its not recognizing the array of structures. Any ideas how I can do this? Thanks.

  • 1
    Your C++ code is incorrect, you declared a structure that doesn't take any space. The arrays are empty. Your testAPI2() function then invokes UB by accessing the arrays as through they are 10 elements long. C++ is a loaded weapon, you aimed it at your foot and pulled the trigger. What happens next while you hop around is completely unguessable. – Hans Passant Feb 17 '14 at 9:43
4

Okay, I have a working sample. I'm posting this as another answer because it's a very different approach.

So, on the C++ side, I've got this header file:

struct Struct1
{
  int d1[10];
  int d2[10];
};

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall 
  TestApi2(int* pLength, Struct1 **pStructures);

And the following code:

__declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall 
  TestApi2(int* pLength, Struct1 **pStructures)
{
  int len = 10;

  *pLength = len;
  *pStructures = (Struct1*)LocalAlloc(0, len * sizeof(Struct1));

  Struct1 *pCur = *pStructures;

  for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
  {
    for (int idx = 0; idx < 10; ++idx)
    {
      pCur->d1[idx] = i + idx;
      pCur->d2[idx] = i + idx;
    }

    pCur ++;
  }
}

Now, the important bit is LocalAlloc. That's actually the place where I've had all the issues, since I allocated the memory wrong. LocalAlloc is the method .NET calls when it does Marshal.AllocHGlobal, which is very handy, since that means we can use the memory in the caller and dispose of it as needed.

Now, this method allows you to return an arbitrary length array of structures. The same approach can be used to eg. return a structure of an array of structures, you're just going deeper. The key is the LocalAlloc - that's memory you can easily access using the Marshal class, and it's memory that isn't thrown away.

The reason you have to also return the length of the array is because there's no way to know how much data you're "returning" otherwise. This is a common "problem" in unmanaged code, and if you've ever done any P/Invoking, you know everything about this.

And now, the C# side. I've tried hard to do this in a nice way, but the problem is that arrays of structures simply aren't blittable, which means you can't simply use MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray, ...). So, we have to go the IntPtr way.

The definitions look like this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public class Struct1
{
  [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
  public int[] d1;

  [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
  public int[] d2;
}        

[DllImport(@"Win32Project.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
static extern void TestApi2(out int length, out IntPtr structs);

Basically, we get a pointer to the length of the "array", and the pointer to the pointer to the first element of the array. That's all we need to read the data.

The code follows:

int length;
IntPtr pStructs;

TestApi2(out length, out pStructs);

// Prepare the C#-side array to copy the data to
Struct1[] structs = new Struct1[length];

IntPtr current = pStructs;
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
{
  // Create a new struct and copy the unmanaged one to it
  structs[i] = new Struct1();
  Marshal.PtrToStructure(current, structs[i]);

  // Clean-up
  Marshal.DestroyStructure(current, typeof(Struct1));

  // And move to the next structure in the array
  current = (IntPtr)((long)current + Marshal.SizeOf(structs[i]));
}

// And finally, dispose of the whole block of unmanaged memory.
Marshal.FreeHGlobal(pStructs);

The only thing that changes if you want to really return a structure of an array of structures is that the method parameters move into the "wrapping" structure. The handy thing is that .NET can automatically handle the marshalling of the wrapper, the less-handy thing is that it can't handle the inner array, so you again have to use length + IntPtr to manage this manually.

  • I will try this and come back to you. Also this is alot of work. I will quite happily arrange a transfer for you, pay - pal, western union, anything that you choose(again this was alot of work!) – user3316669 Feb 18 '14 at 11:50
  • 1
    @user3316669 Don't worry about it, it was fun :) – Luaan Feb 18 '14 at 11:53
  • at this line: Marshal.PtrToStructure(current,structs[i]). I got an error 'The structure must not be a value class. Parameter name: structure'. So I changed that line and structs[i] = new Struct1(); to structs[idx] = (Struct1)Marshal.PtrToStructure(current, typeof(Struct1)); And that seemed to have did the trick! Thanks very much, you help is greatly appreciated here!! – user3316669 Feb 19 '14 at 9:06
  • I also found 2 very interesting articles. Which you might like, implementing the use of ICustomMarsharler. link1 link2 – user3316669 Feb 19 '14 at 9:08
  • @user3316669 That's interesting, it works fine for me. Perhaps you're using a different .NET version? – Luaan Feb 19 '14 at 9:13
2

First, don't use unknown-length arrays at all. You're killing any possible use of arrays between managed and unmanaged code - you can't tell the required size (Marshal.SizeOf is useless), you have to manually pass the array length etc. If it's not a fixed length array, use IntPtr:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential,Pack=8)]
public struct Struct1
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
    public double[] d1;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10)]
    public double[] d2;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct TestStructOuter
{
     public int length;
     public IntPtr embedded;
}

(if your array of embedded is fixed length, feel free to ignore this, but do include the ByValArray, SizeConst bit. You also have to add ArraySubType=System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.Struct to the attribute).

As you've probably noticed, the TestStructOuter is pretty much useless in this case, it only adds complexity (and do note that marshalling is one of the most expensive operations compared to native languages, so if you're calling this often, it's probably a good idea to keep things simple).

Now, you're only allocating memory for the outer struct. Even in your code, Marshal.SizeOf has no idea how big the struct should be; with IntPtr, this is even more so (or, to be more precise, you're only requesting a single IntPtr, ie. 4-8 bytes or so + the length). Most often, you'd want to pass the IntPtr directly, rather than doing this kind of wrapping (using the same thing in C++/CLI is a different thing entirely, although for your case this is unnecessary).

The signature for your method will be something like this:

[DllImport(@"C:\CPP_Projects\DLL\DLLSample\Release\DLLSample.dll", 
 CallingConvention=System.Runtime.InteropServices.CallingConvention.StdCall)]
public static extern  void testAPI2(ref TestStructOuter pTestStructOuter) ;

Now, if you're going with the IntPtr approach, you want to keep allocating memory manually, only you have to do it properly, eg.:

TestStructOuter outer = new TestStructOuter();
testStructOuter.length = 1;
testStructOuter.embedded = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Struct1)));

Marshal.StructureToPtr(embedded, testStructOuter.embedded, false);

And finally, you call the method:

// The marshalling is done automatically
testAPI2(ref outer);

Don't forget to release the memory, ideally in the finally clause of a try around everything since the memory allocation:

Marshal.FreeHGlobal(outer.embedded);

Now, this is overly complicated and not exactly optimal. Leaving out the TestStructOuter is one possibility, then you can simply pass the length and pointer to the embedded array directly, avoiding one unnecessary marshalling. Another option would be to use a fixed size array (if it needs to be an array at all :)) in TestStructOuter, which will cure a lot of your headaches and eliminate any need for manual marshalling. In other words, if TestStructOuter is defined as I've noted before:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct TestStructOuter
{
     [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 10, 
      ArraySubType=UnmanagedType.Struct)]
     public Struct1[] embedded;
}

Suddenly, your whole call and everything becomes as simple as

testAPI2(ref outer);

The whole marshalling is done automatically, no need for manual allocations or conversions.

Hope this helps :)

  • Hi Luaan, I feel like i there is light at the end of the tunnel with your solution :-). very eager to get it going however, I have tried TestStructOuter outer = new TestStructOuter(); outer.length = 10; outer.embedded = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Struct1)) * 10); Marshal.StructureToPtr(outer.embedded, outer.embedded, false); testAPI2(ref outer); outer = (TestStructOuter)(Marshal.PtrToStructure(outer.embedded, typeof(TestStructOuter))); Marshal.FreeHGlobal(outer.embedded); But the program just fails. – user3316669 Feb 17 '14 at 10:09
  • @user3316669 Yeah, your Marshal.StructureToPtr call is wrong. You have to pass the struct you've prepared as the first argument, not the pointer to the unmanaged structure. Also, you're only posting one instance anyway, instead of the 10 you want to pass. Passing multiple structures one after another is a bit tricky, basically, you need to do the StructureToPtr in a cycle while increasing the IntPtr by struct size. Could you perhaps post your test API dll somewhere, so that I could try to make it work? That would make everything a bit faster :) – Luaan Feb 17 '14 at 10:29
  • I would really like to post the complete solution(its very small) somewhere. This is my first time on stackoverflow, I'm not sure where. And the comments are only limited to ~500 characters or so. – user3316669 Feb 17 '14 at 10:38
  • @user3316669 If you're not worried about sharing data with unknown companies, try something like speedyshare.com (Note: I'm not endorsing this particular file sharing site in any way, in fact it's the first one I got off Google, but I'm sure it will be good enough for your sample, unless you're bound by some NDA or something like that). – Luaan Feb 17 '14 at 10:53
  • @user3316669 Don't worry, we can update the question and answer as needed when we figure out what was the actual problem :)) – Luaan Feb 17 '14 at 11:57
2

Hint: Leadn C++/CLI. I had to deal with complex interop two times in my life - once with ISDN (AVM devkits make it a lot easier - sadly C++, I needed C#) and now with Nanex (great real time complex and full market ata feeds, sadl complex C++, I need C#)

Both cases I make my own wrapper in C++/CLI, talking down to C++ and exposing a real object model in C#. Allows me to make things a lot nicer and handle a lot of edge cases that our friendly Marshaller can not handle efficiently.

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