35

I am trying to make a simple Message Box in C in Visual Studio 2012, but I am getting the following error messages

argument of type const char* is incompatible with parameter of type "LPCWSTR"

err LNK2019:unresolved external symbol_main referenced in function_tmainCRTStartup

Here is the source code

#include<Windows.h>

int _stdcall WinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance,HINSTANCE hPrevinstance,LPSTR lpszCmdline,int nCmdShow)
{

    MessageBox(0,"Hello","Title",0);

    return(0);
}

Please Help

Thanks and Regards

7
  • 12
    Check your project's Character Set setting (Project Properties, Configuration Properties, General, Character Set). It's probably set to "Use Unicode" instead of "Use Multi-Byte".
    – TypeIA
    Feb 17, 2014 at 16:56
  • 5
    You are running your code on a Unicode operating system. You should use Unicode strings. Like L"Hello". You can turn the clock back to 1991 but there isn't much point in using C if you do that. Feb 17, 2014 at 17:04
  • @HansPassant or switch to multibyte. The Windows API is designed to allow you use either/or. Note that "multibyte" strings can still encode Unicode code points, so choosing this option is not necessarily "turning the clock back to 1991." Perfectly correct, globalized, Unicode-aware applications can be written using multibyte (rather than wide character) strings.
    – TypeIA
    Feb 17, 2014 at 17:05
  • 3
    No, the winapi is designed to support old projects, ones that got started in the previous century. Creating a new one and intentionally making the code slow by forcing the compatibility functions to convert the strings makes very little sense. Might as well use a scripting language. Feb 17, 2014 at 17:07
  • 1
    @HansPassant No. The world runs on UTF8, use it as your internal representation for easy compatibility with the world, or perhaps use UCS4 if you need serious character-level text processing. The half-arsed 16-bit encoding from the previous millennium is an interesting curiosity that should stay in the museum of ancient computing. Windows OS intermal reliance on this encoding is a bug, not a feature. A minuscule speed improvement is not a valid reason to admit such a bug to your own code. Feb 17, 2014 at 17:54

4 Answers 4

27

To compile your code in Visual C++ you need to use Multi-Byte char WinAPI functions instead of Wide char ones.

Set Project -> Properties -> General -> Character Set option to Use Multi-Byte Character Set

I found it here https://stackoverflow.com/a/33001454/5646315

2
  • 2
    Very useful answer!
    – zephyr
    Oct 18, 2017 at 14:56
  • 8
    In Visual Studio 2019 this is now mapped to: Project -> Properties -> Advanced -> Character -> Use Multi-Byte Character Set
    – Cherona
    Mar 1, 2021 at 6:55
25

To make your code compile in both modes, enclose the strings in _T() and use the TCHAR equivalents

#include <tchar.h>
#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI _tWinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance, HINSTANCE hPrevinstance, LPTSTR lpszCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(0,_T("Hello"),_T("Title"),0);
    return 0;
}
14
  • throuh your sugestion the argument of type const char* get removed
    – user2341787
    Feb 17, 2014 at 18:49
  • but it still showing the unresolve externalsymbol_main referenced in function_tmainCRTStartup
    – user2341787
    Feb 17, 2014 at 18:50
  • Corrected the winmain part. If you get Visual Studio to create the dummy program for you, that is what it will give you.
    – cup
    Feb 17, 2014 at 18:58
  • _T is the wrong macro. It should be TEXT (see TEXT vs. _TEXT vs. _T, and UNICODE vs. _UNICODE). Jun 18, 2022 at 8:54
  • @IInspectable - It may be the wrong macro according to your article but why don't you just try the above program, replacing _T with TEXT and try compiling to prove your point. If it builds, then you've proved your point.
    – cup
    Jun 19, 2022 at 22:46
6

I recently ran in to this issue and did some research and thought I would document some of what I found here.

To start, when calling MessageBox(...), you are really just calling a macro (for backwards compatibility reasons) that is calling either MessageBoxA(...) for ANSI encoding or MessageBoxW(...) for Unicode encoding.

So if you are going to pass in an ANSI string with the default compiler setup in Visual Studio, you can call MessageBoxA(...) instead:

#include<Windows.h>

int _stdcall WinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance,HINSTANCE hPrevinstance,LPSTR lpszCmdline,int nCmdShow)
{

    MessageBoxA(0,"Hello","Title",0);

    return(0);
}

Full documentation for MessageBox(...) is located here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms645505(v=vs.85).aspx

And to expand on what @cup said in their answer, you could use the _T() macro and continue to use MessageBox():

#include<tchar.h>
#include<Windows.h>

int _stdcall WinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance,HINSTANCE hPrevinstance,LPSTR lpszCmdline,int nCmdShow)
{

    MessageBox(0,_T("Hello"),_T("Title"),0);

    return(0);
}

The _T() macro is making the string "character set neutral". You could use this to setup all strings as Unicode by defining the symbol _UNICODE before you build (documentation).

Hope this information will help you and anyone else encountering this issue.

1

Yes whatever it was it was a wrong tutorial, you need to make it a long byte integer.

Try this:

#include<Windows.h>
int _stdcall WinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance,HINSTANCE hPrevinstance,LPSTR lpszCmdline,int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(0,L"Hello",L"Title",0);
    return(0);
}
1

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