5

I'm using bash 4.1. I am using a letter to delimit the date and the time fields of a date string to be converted by date. It appears that each letter causes a different value (from -5 to +18) to be added to the time specified. But note that J results in an error. I cannot find an explanation for this behaviour in either the man or the info pages. Can someone enlighten me?

$ date -d 2014-01-01A00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 19:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01B00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 20:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01C00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 21:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01D00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 22:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01E00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 23:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01F00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 00:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01G00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 01:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01H00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 02:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01I00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 03:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01J00:00:00
date: invalid date `2014-01-01J00:00:00'
$ date -d 2014-01-01K00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 04:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01L00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 05:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01M00:00:00
Wed Jan  1 06:00:00 CST 2014
$ date -d 2014-01-01N00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 17:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01O00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 16:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01P00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 15:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01Q00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 14:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01R00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 13:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01S00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 12:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01T00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 11:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01U00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 10:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01V00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 09:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01W00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 08:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01X00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 07:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01Y00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 06:00:00 CST 2013
$ date -d 2014-01-01Z00:00:00
Tue Dec 31 18:00:00 CST 2013
  • Timezone most likely – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 20:09
  • @GIJoe It doesn't seem to be related to TZ. Would be worthwhile to dig into the sources. – devnull Feb 17 '14 at 20:16
  • @CPRitter don't mess up with the formatting once somebody has fixed it. – devnull Feb 17 '14 at 20:18
  • @devnull I guess we were fixing it simultaneously. – CPRitter Feb 17 '14 at 20:20
  • @devnull: It is related to timezones - military time zones.. see my research. I looked at the code in GNU coreutils as well. – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 21:01
5

Look at the letters sorted by their associated time:

YXWVUTSRQPON Z ABCDEFGHIKLM

I highlighted Z because this is (in your example) Wed Jan 1 00:00:00 GMT 2014. A-M represent timezones west (later) than GMT, N-Y timezones east (later). so you get GMT, 12 timezones east and 12 west, which makes 25. J just happens to be the letter that was left out, for whatever reason.

  • I guess that explains the behavior, but I don't have any sources. If an answer with references comes up, make sure you accept that one. – Silly Freak Feb 17 '14 at 20:22
  • Here's wikipedia on the subject ..link – CPRitter Feb 17 '14 at 20:35
  • 2
    Still I find it disturbing that neither man nor info seem to mention this. – CPRitter Feb 17 '14 at 20:39
  • Another reference on timeanddate.com ; it is only disturbing when you consider the fact that documentation comes after coding. It may have simply slipped someone's mind. – user539810 Feb 17 '14 at 20:41
  • It's related to military time. See my answer. – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 21:00
4

GNU date follows RFC 822 or ISO 8601. In RFC 822 (obsolete), as described in the superseding document RFC 2822, military time zones were defined:

The 1 character military time zones were defined in a non-standard way in [RFC822] and are therefore unpredictable in their meaning. The original definitions of the military zones "A" through "I" are equivalent to "+0100" through "+0900" respectively; "K", "L", and "M" are equivalent to "+1000", "+1100", and "+1200" respectively; "N" through "Y" are equivalent to "-0100" through "-1200" respectively; and "Z" is equivalent to "+0000". However, because of the error in [RFC822], they SHOULD all be considered equivalent to "-0000" unless there is out-of-band information confirming their meaning.

In RFC 822, this was known as the "hour zone". The comment in RFC 822 calls it this and defines it as either "ANSI or Military".

From RFC 822:

The military standard uses a single character for each zone. "Z" is Universal Time. "A" indicates one hour earlier, and "M" indicates 12 hours earlier; "N" is one hour later, and "Y" is 12 hours later. The letter "J" is not used.

This all makes sense because it is likely that RFC 822 was written around the time of ARPANET and ARPANET came out of DoD circles.

Here is a list of military time zones.

By the way, Local time is specifically designated in the military as zone J or "Juliet".

  • Helpful, thanks; in what way was the RFC 822 definition non-standard/erroneous? Given that T is just a literal separator in ISO 8601, how does GNU date decide whether to interpret it as that (and thus the time as local) or as military time zone UTC-07:00? – mklement0 Feb 17 '14 at 21:19
  • @mklement0: If it has a T and follows ISO 8601, then it probably parses it as ISO 8601. RFC822 looks slightly different it appears – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 21:23
  • @mklement0: I don't know what error they are referring to in RFC822. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601 – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 21:23
  • ISO 8601 Combined Date and Time: 2014-02-17T08:22:10+00:00<BR> 2014-02-17T08:22:10Z – Brian Feb 17 '14 at 21:24
  • Yes, with a time-zone spec it becomes unambiguous; without one, though, there is ambiguity, and on my Ubuntu 12.04 system (GNU date 8.13), the behavior is inconsistent: 'T' seems to be be interpreted as ISO 8601 (local time) rather than RFC 822 (UTC-7), whereas other letters are interpreted according to RFC 822. – mklement0 Feb 17 '14 at 21:29

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