I just started with game development in android, and I'm working on a super simple game.

The game is basically like flappy bird.

I managed to get everything to work, but I get a lot of stutters and lags.

The phone I'm using for testing is LG G2, so it should and does run games much heavier and complex than this.

Basically there are 4 'obstacles' that are a full screen width apart from each other.
When the game starts, the obstacles start to move (toward the character) at a constant speed. The player character's x value is consistent throughout the whole game, while its y value changes.

The lag occurs mainly when the character passes through an obstacle (and sometimes a little after that obstacle too). What happens is that there are uneven delays in each drawing of the game state causing stutters in the movements.

  • GC does not run according to the log.
  • The stutters ARE NOT caused by the speed being too high (I know that because at the beginning of the game when the obstacles are out of view the character moves smoothly)
  • I don't think the problem is FPS related too, because even when the MAX_FPS field is set to 100 there are still stutters.

My thought is that there is a line or multiple lines of code that cause some kinda of delay to happen (and thus frames skipped). I also think that these lines should be around the update() and draw() methods of PlayerCharacter, Obstacle, and MainGameBoard.

The problem is, I'm still new to android development and android game development specifically, so I have no idea what could cause such delay.

I tried looking online for answers... Unfortunately, all of which I found pointed over to the GC being to blame. However, such I don't believe it it the case (correct me if I'm being wrong) those answers do no apply to me. I also read the android developer's Performance Tips page, but couldn't find anything that helped.

So, please, help me find the answer to solving these annoying lags!

Some code

MainThread.java:

public class MainThread extends Thread {

public static final String TAG = MainThread.class.getSimpleName();
private final static int    MAX_FPS = 60;   // desired fps
private final static int    MAX_FRAME_SKIPS = 5;    // maximum number of frames to be skipped
private final static int    FRAME_PERIOD = 1000 / MAX_FPS;  // the frame period

private boolean running;
public void setRunning(boolean running) {
    this.running = running;
}

private SurfaceHolder mSurfaceHolder;
private MainGameBoard mMainGameBoard;

public MainThread(SurfaceHolder surfaceHolder, MainGameBoard gameBoard) {
    super();
    mSurfaceHolder = surfaceHolder;
    mMainGameBoard = gameBoard;
}

@Override
public void run() {
    Canvas mCanvas;
    Log.d(TAG, "Starting game loop");

    long beginTime;     // the time when the cycle begun
    long timeDiff;      // the time it took for the cycle to execute
    int sleepTime;      // ms to sleep (<0 if we're behind)
    int framesSkipped;  // number of frames being skipped 

    sleepTime = 0;

    while(running) {
        mCanvas = null;
        try {
            mCanvas = this.mSurfaceHolder.lockCanvas();
            synchronized (mSurfaceHolder) {
                beginTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
                framesSkipped = 0;


                this.mMainGameBoard.update();

                this.mMainGameBoard.render(mCanvas);

                timeDiff = System.currentTimeMillis() - beginTime;

                sleepTime = (int) (FRAME_PERIOD - timeDiff);

                if(sleepTime > 0) {
                    try {
                        Thread.sleep(sleepTime);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
                }

                while(sleepTime < 0 && framesSkipped < MAX_FRAME_SKIPS) {
                    // catch up - update w/o render
                    this.mMainGameBoard.update();
                    sleepTime += FRAME_PERIOD;
                    framesSkipped++;
                }
            }
        } finally {
            if(mCanvas != null)
                mSurfaceHolder.unlockCanvasAndPost(mCanvas);
        }
    }
}
}

MainGameBoard.java:

public class MainGameBoard extends SurfaceView implements
    SurfaceHolder.Callback {

private MainThread mThread;
private PlayerCharacter mPlayer;
private Obstacle[] mObstacleArray = new Obstacle[4];
public static final String TAG = MainGameBoard.class.getSimpleName();
private long width, height;
private boolean gameStartedFlag = false, gameOver = false, update = true;
private Paint textPaint = new Paint();
private int scoreCount = 0;
private Obstacle collidedObs;

public MainGameBoard(Context context) {
    super(context);
    getHolder().addCallback(this);

    DisplayMetrics displaymetrics = new DisplayMetrics();
    ((Activity) getContext()).getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(displaymetrics);
    height = displaymetrics.heightPixels;
    width = displaymetrics.widthPixels;

    mPlayer = new PlayerCharacter(BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.ic_launcher), width/2, height/2);

    for (int i = 1; i <= 4; i++) {
        mObstacleArray[i-1] = new Obstacle(width*(i+1) - 200, height, i);
    }

    mThread = new MainThread(getHolder(), this);

    setFocusable(true);
}

@Override
public void surfaceChanged(SurfaceHolder holder, int format, int width,
        int height) {
}

@Override
public void surfaceCreated(SurfaceHolder holder) {
    mThread.setRunning(true);
    mThread.start();
}

@Override
public void surfaceDestroyed(SurfaceHolder holder) {
    Log.d(TAG, "Surface is being destroyed");
    // tell the thread to shut down and wait for it to finish
    // this is a clean shutdown
    boolean retry = true;
    while (retry) {
        try {
            mThread.join();
            retry = false;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // try again shutting down the thread
        }
    }
    Log.d(TAG, "Thread was shut down cleanly");
}

@Override
public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent event) {

    if(event.getAction() == MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN) {
        if(update && !gameOver) {
            if(gameStartedFlag) {
                mPlayer.cancelJump();
                mPlayer.setJumping(true);
            }

            if(!gameStartedFlag)
                gameStartedFlag = true;
        }
    } 


    return true;
}

@SuppressLint("WrongCall")
public void render(Canvas canvas) {
    onDraw(canvas);
}

@Override
protected void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
    canvas.drawColor(Color.GRAY);
    mPlayer.draw(canvas);

    for (Obstacle obs : mObstacleArray) {
        obs.draw(canvas);
    }

    if(gameStartedFlag) {
        textPaint.reset();
        textPaint.setColor(Color.WHITE);
        textPaint.setTextAlign(Paint.Align.CENTER);
        textPaint.setTextSize(100);
        canvas.drawText(String.valueOf(scoreCount), width/2, 400, textPaint);
    }

    if(!gameStartedFlag && !gameOver) {
        textPaint.reset();
        textPaint.setColor(Color.WHITE);
        textPaint.setTextAlign(Paint.Align.CENTER);
        textPaint.setTextSize(72);
        canvas.drawText("Tap to start", width/2, 200, textPaint);
    }

    if(gameOver) {      
        textPaint.reset();
        textPaint.setColor(Color.WHITE);
        textPaint.setTextAlign(Paint.Align.CENTER);
        textPaint.setTextSize(86);

        canvas.drawText("GAME OVER", width/2, 200, textPaint);
    }

}

public void update() {
    if(gameStartedFlag && !gameOver) {  
        for (Obstacle obs : mObstacleArray) {
            if(update) {
                if(obs.isColidingWith(mPlayer)) {
                    collidedObs = obs;
                    update = false;
                    gameOver = true;
                    return;
                } else {
                    obs.update(width);
                    if(obs.isScore(mPlayer))
                        scoreCount++;
                }
            }
        }

        if(!mPlayer.update() || !update)
            gameOver = true;
    }
}

}

PlayerCharacter.java:

public void draw(Canvas canvas) {
    canvas.drawBitmap(mBitmap, (float) x - (mBitmap.getWidth() / 2), (float) y - (mBitmap.getHeight() / 2), null);
}

public boolean update() {
    if(jumping) {
        y -= jumpSpeed;
        jumpSpeed -= startJumpSpd/20f;

        jumpTick--;
    } else if(!jumping) {
        if(getBottomY() >= startY*2)
            return false;

        y += speed;
        speed += startSpd/25f;
    }

    if(jumpTick == 0) {
        jumping = false;
        cancelJump(); //rename
    }

    return true;
}

public void cancelJump() { //also called when the user touches the screen in order to stop a jump and start a new jump
    jumpTick = 20;

    speed = Math.abs(jumpSpeed);
    jumpSpeed = 20f;
}

Obstacle.java:

public void draw(Canvas canvas) {
    Paint pnt = new Paint();
    pnt.setColor(Color.CYAN);
    canvas.drawRect(x, 0, x+200, ySpaceStart, pnt);
    canvas.drawRect(x, ySpaceStart+500, x+200, y, pnt);
    pnt.setColor(Color.RED);
    canvas.drawCircle(x, y, 20f, pnt);
}

public void update(long width) {
    x -= speed;

    if(x+200 <= 0) {
        x = ((startX+200)/(index+1))*4 - 200;
        ySpaceStart = r.nextInt((int) (y-750-250+1)) + 250;
        scoreGiven = false;
    }
}

public boolean isColidingWith(PlayerCharacter mPlayer) {
    if(mPlayer.getRightX() >= x && mPlayer.getLeftX() <= x+20)
        if(mPlayer.getTopY() <= ySpaceStart || mPlayer.getBottomY() >= ySpaceStart+500)
            return true;

    return false;
}

public boolean isScore(PlayerCharacter mPlayer) {
    if(mPlayer.getRightX() >= x+100 && !scoreGiven) {
        scoreGiven = true;
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}
  • Profile using e.g. DDMS method profiling: software.intel.com/en-us/articles/… or other techniques. Neither the log nor some magic MAX FPS (and max does not mean that it will always run that fast, it's just where it caps) will tell you a proper reason. – zapl Feb 17 '14 at 20:35
  • Missing constructors in your Obstacle.java and PlayerCharacter.java classes – tpbapp Mar 6 '14 at 11:54
  • 1
    Certainly you should not be using synchronize and keeping the canvas locked while the main thread is sleeping. This is asking for all kinds of trouble. Your animation loop doesn't make much sense. – Gene Mar 13 '14 at 1:48

Update: As detailed as this was, it barely scratched the surface. A more detailed explanation is now available. The game loop advice is in Appendix A. If you really want to understand what's going on, start with that.

Original post follows...


I'm going to start with a capsule summary of how the graphics pipeline in Android works. You can find more thorough treatments (e.g. some nicely detailed Google I/O talks), so I'm just hitting the high points. This turned out rather longer than I expected, but I've been wanting to write some of this up for a while.

SurfaceFlinger

Your application does not draw on The Framebuffer. Some devices don't even have The Framebuffer. Your application holds the "producer" side of a BufferQueue object. When it has completed rendering a frame, it calls unlockCanvasAndPost() or eglSwapBuffers(), which queues up the completed buffer for display. (Technically, rendering may not even begin until you tell it to swap and can continue while the buffer is moving through the pipeline, but that's a story for another time.)

The buffer gets sent to the "consumer" side of the queue, which in this case is SurfaceFlinger, the system surface compositor. Buffers are passed by handle; the contents are not copied. Every time the display refresh (let's call it "VSYNC") starts, SurfaceFlinger looks at all the various queues to see what buffers are available. If it finds new content, it latches the next buffer from that queue. If it doesn't, it uses whatever it got previously.

The collection of windows (or "layers") that have visible content are then composited together. This may be done by SurfaceFlinger (using OpenGL ES to render the layers into a new buffer) or through the Hardware Composer HAL. The hardware composer (available on most recent devices) is provided by the hardware OEM, and can provide a number of "overlay" planes. If SurfaceFlinger has three windows to display, and the HWC has three overlay planes available, it puts each window into one overlay, and does the composition as the frame is being displayed. There is never a buffer that holds all the data. This is generally more efficient than doing the same thing in GLES. (Incidentally, this is why you can't grab a screen shot on most recent devices by simply opening the framebuffer dev entry and reading pixels.)

So that's what the consumer side looks like. You can admire it for yourself with adb shell dumpsys SurfaceFlinger. Let's go back to the producer (i.e. your app).

the producer

You're using a SurfaceView, which has two parts: a transparent View that lives with the system UI, and a separate Surface layer all its own. The SurfaceView's surface goes directly to SurfaceFlinger, which is why it has much less overhead than other approaches (like TextureView).

The BufferQueue for the SurfaceView's surface is triple-buffered. That means you can have one buffer being scanned out for the display, one buffer that is sitting at SurfaceFlinger waiting for the next VSYNC, and one buffer for your app to draw on. Having more buffers improves throughput and smooths out bumps, but increases the latency between when you touch the screen and when you see an update. Adding additional buffering of whole frames on top of this won't generally do you much good.

If you draw faster than the display can render frames, you will eventually fill up the queue, and your buffer-swap call (unlockCanvasAndPost()) will pause. This is an easy way to make your game's update rate the same as the display rate -- draw as fast as you can, and let the system slow you down. Each frame, you advance state according to how much time has elapsed. (I used this approach in Android Breakout.) It's not quite right, but at 60fps you won't really notice the imperfections. You'll get the same effect with sleep() calls if you don't sleep for long enough -- you'll wake up only to wait on the queue. In this case there's no advantage to sleeping, because sleeping on the queue is equally efficient.

If you draw slower than the display can render frames, the queue will eventually run dry, and SurfaceFlinger will display the same frame on two consecutive display refreshes. This will happen periodically if you're trying to pace your game with sleep() calls and you're sleeping for too long. It is impossible to precisely match the display refresh rate, for theoretical reasons (it's hard to implement a PLL without a feedback mechanism) and practical reasons (the refresh rate can change over time, e.g. I've seen it vary from 58fps to 62fps on a given device).

Using sleep() calls in a game loop to pace your animation is a bad idea.

going without sleep

You have a couple of choices. You can use the "draw as fast as you can until the buffer-swap call backs up" approach, which is what a lot of apps based on GLSurfaceView#onDraw() do (whether they know it or not). Or you can use Choreographer.

Choreographer allows you to set a callback that fires on the next VSYNC. Importantly, the argument to the callback is the actual VSYNC time. So even if your app doesn't wake up right away, you still have an accurate picture of when the display refresh began. This turns out to be very useful when updating your game state.

The code that updates game state should never be designed to advance "one frame". Given the variety of devices, and the variety of refresh rates that a single device can use, you can't know what a "frame" is. Your game will play slightly slow or slightly fast -- or if you get lucky and somebody tries to play it on a TV locked to 48Hz over HDMI, you'll be seriously sluggish. You need to determine the time difference between the previous frame and the current frame, and advance the game state appropriately.

This may require a bit of a mental reshuffle, but it's worth it.

You can see this in action in Breakout, which advances the ball position based on elapsed time. It cuts big jumps in time into smaller pieces to keep the collision detection simple. The trouble with Breakout is that it's using the stuff-the-queue-full approach, the timestamps are subject to variations in the time required for SurfaceFlinger to do work. Also, when the buffer queue is initially empty you can submit frames very quickly. (This means you compute two frames with nearly zero time delta, but they're still sent to the display at 60fps. In practice you don't see this, because the time stamp difference is so small that it just looks like the same frame drawn twice, and it only happens when transitioning from non-animating to animating so you don't see anything stutter.)

With Choreographer, you get the actual VSYNC time, so you get a nice regular clock to base your time intervals off of. Because you're using the display refresh time as your clock source, you never get out of sync with the display.

Of course, you still have to be prepared to drop frames.

no frame left behind

A while back I added a screen recording demo to Grafika ("Record GL app") that does very simple animation -- just a flat-shaded bouncing rectangle and a spinning triangle. It advances state and draws when Choreographer signals. I coded it up, ran it... and started to notice Choreographer callbacks backing up.

After digging at it with systrace, I discovered that the framework UI was occasionally doing some layout work (probably to do with the buttons and text in the UI layer, which sits on top of the SurfaceView surface). Normally this took 6ms, but if I wasn't actively moving my finger around the screen, my Nexus 5 slowed the various clocks to reduce power consumption and improve battery life. The re-layout took 28ms instead. Bear in mind that a 60fps frame is 16.7ms.

The GL rendering was nearly instantaneous, but the Choreographer update was being delivered to the UI thread, which was grinding away at the layout, so my renderer thread didn't get the signal until much later. (You could have Choreographer deliver the signal directly to the renderer thread, but there's a bug in Choreographer that will cause a memory leak if you do.) The fix was to drop frames when the current time is more than 15ms after the VSYNC time. The app still does the state update -- the collision detection is so rudimentary that weird stuff happens if you let the time gap grow too large -- but it doesn't submit a buffer to SurfaceFlinger.

While running the app you can tell when frames are being dropped, because Grafika flashes the border red and updates a counter on screen. You can't tell by watching the animation. Because the state updates are based on time intervals, not frame counts, everything moves just as fast as it would whether the frame was dropped or not, and at 60fps you won't notice a single dropped frame. (Depends to some extent on your eyes, the game, and the characteristics of the display hardware.)

Key lessons:

  • Frame drops can be caused by external factors -- dependency on another thread, CPU clock speeds, background gmail sync, etc.
  • You can't avoid all frame drops.
  • If you set your draw loop up right, nobody will notice.

Drawing

Rendering to a Canvas can be very efficient if it's hardware-accelerated. If it's not, and you're doing the drawing in software, it can take a while -- especially if you're touching lots of pixels.

Two important bits of reading: learn about hardware-accelerated rendering, and using the hardware scaler to reduce the number of pixels your app needs to touch. The "Hardware scaler exerciser" in Grafika will give you a sense for what happens when you reduce the size of your drawing surface -- you can get pretty small before the effects are noticeable. (I find it oddly amusing to watch GL render a spinning triangle on a 100x64 surface.)

You can also take some of the mystery out of the rendering by using OpenGL ES directly. There's a bit of a bump learning how things work, but Breakout (and, for a more elaborate example, Replica Island) show everything you need for a simple game.

  • Fanstastic explanation and great article. Thank you. Do you know if the memory leak when using Choreographer callbacks on the render thread is still an issue? – Maria Mar 18 '15 at 12:13
  • Also how would you combine Choreographer callbacks with an NDK app using NativeAcivity and native OpenGL ES rendering? I suppose the callbacks should arrive on the looper thread in the java code and be forwarded to native via JNI from where the native render thread should be signaled? – Maria Mar 18 '15 at 12:21
  • @Maria: I don't know the status of the memory leak. It's probably fixed by Android 5.0, but you'd still have a problem on older devices. {~ignore} Chor test in Grafika (github.com/google/grafika/blob/master/src/com/android/grafika/…) was written to exercise the behavior. IIRC, it prevents the Activity from being released when you switch away. For the NDK, as you said, you write the callback in Java code and signal the native thread. – fadden Mar 18 '15 at 15:58

Without ever having made a game in Android, I do have made 2D-games in Java/AWT using Canvas and bufferStrategy...

If you experience flickering, you could always go for a manual double-buffer (get rid of flickering) by rendering to an offscreen Image, and then just page-flip / drawImage with the new pre-rendered contents directly.

But, I get the feeling that you're more concerned about "smoothness" in your animation, in which case I'd recommend that you extend your code with interpolation in-between the different animation ticks;

Currently, your rendering loop update logical state (move things logically) in the same pace as you render, and measure with some reference time and try to keep track of passed time.

Instead, you should update in whichever frequency you feel is desirable for the "logics" in your code to work -- typically 10 or 25Hz is just fine (I call it "update ticks", which is completely different from the actual FPS), whereas the rendering is done by keeping high-resolution track of time for measuring "how long" your actual rendering takes (I've used nanoTime and that has been quite sufficient, whereas currentTimeInMillis is rather useless...),

In that way, you can interpolate between ticks and render as many frames as possible until the next tick by calculating fine-grained positions based on how much time has passed since the last tick, compared to how much time it "should" be between two ticks (since you always know where you are - position, and where you're heading -- velocity)

That way, you will get the same "animation speed" regardless of CPU/platform, but more or less smoothness since faster CPUs will perform more renders between different ticks.

EDIT

Some copy-paste/conceptual code -- but do note that this was AWT and J2SE, no Android. However, as a concept and with some Androidification I'm sure this approach should render smoothly unless the calculus done in your logic/update is too heavy (e.g., N^2 algorithms for collision detection and N grows big with particle systems and the like).

Active render loop

Instead of relying on repaint to do the painting for you (which might take different time, depending on what OS is doing), the first step is to take active control over the rendering loop and use a BufferStrategy where you render and then actively "show" the contents when you're done, before going back at it again.

Buffer strategy

Might require som special Android-stuff to get going, but it's fairly straight forward. I use 2-pages for the bufferStrategy to create a "page-flipping" mechanism.

try
{
     EventQueue.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
        public void run()
        {
            canvas.createBufferStrategy(2);
        }
    });
}    
catch(Exception x)
{
    //BufferStrategy creation interrupted!        
}

Main animation loop

Then, in your main loop, get the strategy and take active control (don't use repaint)!

long previousTime = 0L;
long passedTime = 0L;

BufferStrategy strategy = canvas.getBufferStrategy();

while(...)
{
    Graphics2D bufferGraphics = (Graphics2D)strategy.getDrawGraphics();

    //Ensure that the bufferStrategy is there..., else abort loop!
    if(strategy.contentsLost())
        break;

    //Calc interpolation value as a double value in the range [0.0 ... 1.0] 
    double interpolation = (double)passedTime / (double)desiredInterval;

    //1:st -- interpolate all objects and let them calc new positions
    interpolateObjects(interpolation);

    //2:nd -- render all objects
    renderObjects(bufferGraphics);

    //Update knowledge of elapsed time
    long time = System.nanoTime();
    passedTime += time - previousTime;
    previousTime = time;

    //Let others work for a while...
    Thread.yield();

    strategy.show();
    bufferGraphics.dispose();

    //Is it time for an animation update?
    if(passedTime > desiredInterval)
    {
        //Update all objects with new "real" positions, collision detection, etc... 
        animateObjects();

        //Consume slack...
        for(; passedTime > desiredInterval; passedTime -= desiredInterval);
    }
}

An object managed be the above main loop would then look something along the lines of;

public abstract class GfxObject
{
    //Where you were
    private GfxPoint oldCurrentPosition;

    //Current position (where you are right now, logically)
    protected GfxPoint currentPosition;

    //Last known interpolated postion (
    private GfxPoint interpolatedPosition;

    //You're heading somewhere?
    protected GfxPoint velocity;

    //Gravity might affect as well...?
    protected GfxPoint gravity;

    public GfxObject(...)
    {
        ...
    }

    public GfxPoint getInterpolatedPosition()
    {
        return this.interpolatedPosition;
    }

    //Time to move the object, taking velocity and gravity into consideration
    public void moveObject()
    {
        velocity.add(gravity);
        oldCurrentPosition.set(currentPosition);
        currentPosition.add(velocity);
    }

    //Abstract method forcing subclasses to define their own actual appearance, using "getInterpolatedPosition" to get the object's current position for rendering smoothly...
    public abstract void renderObject(Graphics2D graphics, ...);

    public void animateObject()
    {
        //Well, move as default -- subclasses can then extend this behavior and add collision detection etc depending on need
        moveObject();
    }

    public void interpolatePosition(double interpolation)
    {
        interpolatedPosition.set(
                                 (currentPosition.x - oldCurrentPosition.x) * interpolation + oldCurrentPosition.x,
                                 (currentPosition.y - oldCurrentPosition.y) * interpolation + oldCurrentPosition.y);
    }
}

All 2D positions are managed using a GfxPoint utility class with double precision (since the interpolated movements might be very fine and rounding is typically not wanted until rendering the actual graphics). To simplify the math stuff needed and making code more readable, I've also added various methods.

public class GfxPoint
{
    public double x;
    public double y;

    public GfxPoint()
    {
        x = 0.0;
        y = 0.0;
    }

    public GfxPoint(double init_x, double init_y)
    {
        x = init_x;
        y = init_y;
    }

    public void add(GfxPoint p)
    {
        x += p.x;
        y += p.y;
    }

    public void add(double x_inc, double y_inc)
    {
        x += x_inc;
        y += y_inc;
    }

    public void sub(GfxPoint p)
    {
        x -= p.x;
        y -= p.y;
    }

    public void sub(double x_dec, double y_dec)
    {
        x -= x_dec;
        y -= y_dec;
    }

    public void set(GfxPoint p)
    {
        x = p.x;
        y = p.y;
    }

    public void set(double x_new, double y_new)
    {
        x = x_new;
        y = y_new;
    }

    public void mult(GfxPoint p)
    {
        x *= p.x;
        y *= p.y;
    }



    public void mult(double x_mult, double y_mult)
    {
        x *= x_mult;
        y *= y_mult;
    }

    public void mult(double factor)
    {
        x *= factor;
        y *= factor;
    }

    public void reset()
    {
        x = 0.0D;
        y = 0.0D;
    }

    public double length()
    {
        double quadDistance = x * x + y * y;

        if(quadDistance != 0.0D)
            return Math.sqrt(quadDistance);
        else
            return 0.0D;
    }

    public double scalarProduct(GfxPoint p)
    {
        return scalarProduct(p.x, p.y);
    }

    public double scalarProduct(double x_comp, double y_comp)
    {
        return x * x_comp + y * y_comp;
    }

    public static double crossProduct(GfxPoint p1, GfxPoint p2, GfxPoint p3)
    {
        return (p2.x - p1.x) * (p3.y - p1.y) - (p3.x - p1.x) * (p2.y - p1.y);
    }

    public double getAngle()
    {
        double angle = 0.0D;

        if(x > 0.0D)
            angle = Math.atan(y / x);
        else if(x < 0.0D)
            angle = Math.PI + Math.atan(y / x);
        else if(y > 0.0D)
            angle = Math.PI / 2;
        else
            angle = - Math.PI / 2;

        if(angle < 0.0D)
            angle += 2 * Math.PI;
        if(angle > 2 * Math.PI)
            angle -= 2 * Math.PI;

        return angle;
    }
}
  • Hi, your answer sounds like it could work! Could you please further edit it with some examples? I didn't really get the 5th-6th paragraphs. Thanks! – Asaf Feb 17 '14 at 21:15
  • 2
    Hi -- edited my answer above with code/concept approach that I used in my games "back then" ;) I used 10Hz for animation (logical steps/ticks), whereas the rendering was smooth as silk at 60FPS, and I had some serious collision detection / bouncing calculus going on as well. The approach is good, I dare to say, and is well proven as interpolation as a concept is used in all "professional" games today to separate logical positions from rendered positions and achieve the same "game-speed" on slow and fast platforms. Good luck ;) – Markus Millfjord Feb 18 '14 at 10:00
  • I see - thank you! That seems like a really good approach, but it won't work without a BufferStrategy will it? I'm not sure there is an equivalent to it in android... as far as I/google knows. – Asaf Feb 18 '14 at 19:40
  • Did some googling myself out of curiosity, and no -- you're right. Seems like OpenGL is the way to go -- you can adopt the same concept of interpolation and really smooth animations, but the logic in "how" to setup the active rendering loop needs to be done differently. stackoverflow.com/questions/8522566/… – Markus Millfjord Feb 18 '14 at 20:24

Try this one on for size. You'll notice you only sync and lock the canvas for the shortest period of time. Otherwise the OS will either A) Drop the buffer because you were too slow or B) not update at all until your Sleep wait is finished.

public class MainThread extends Thread
{
    public static final String TAG = MainThread.class.getSimpleName();
    private final static int    MAX_FPS = 60;   // desired fps
    private final static int    MAX_FRAME_SKIPS = 5;    // maximum number of frames to be skipped
    private final static int    FRAME_PERIOD = 1000 / MAX_FPS;  // the frame period

    private boolean running;


    public void setRunning(boolean running) {
        this.running = running;
    }

    private SurfaceHolder mSurfaceHolder;
    private MainGameBoard mMainGameBoard;

    public MainThread(SurfaceHolder surfaceHolder, MainGameBoard gameBoard) {
        super();
        mSurfaceHolder = surfaceHolder;
        mMainGameBoard = gameBoard;
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        Log.d(TAG, "Starting game loop");
        long beginTime;     // the time when the cycle begun
        long timeDiff;      // the time it took for the cycle to execute
        int sleepTime;      // ms to sleep (<0 if we're behind)
        int framesSkipped;  // number of frames being skipped 
        sleepTime = 0;

        while(running)
        {
            beginTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            framesSkipped = 0;
            synchronized(mSurfaceHolder){
                Canvas canvas = null;
                try{
                    canvas = mSurfaceHolder.lockCanvas();
                    mMainGameBoard.update();
                    mMainGameBoard.render(canvas);
                }
                finally{
                    if(canvas != null){
                        mSurfaceHolder.unlockCanvasAndPost(canvas);
                    }
                }
            }
            timeDiff = System.currentTimeMillis() - beginTime;
            sleepTime = (int)(FRAME_PERIOD - timeDiff);
            if(sleepTime > 0){
                try{
                    Thread.sleep(sleepTime);
                }
                catch(InterruptedException e){
                    //
                }
            }
            while(sleepTime < 0 && framesSkipped < MAX_FRAME_SKIPS) {
                // catch up - update w/o render
                mMainGameBoard.update();
                sleepTime += FRAME_PERIOD;
                framesSkipped++;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • Thank you. After testing your code I have noticed that what happens now is that the speed of my objects became inconsistent. I guess it is because of the fact that the screen is updated as fast as possible instead of at a fixed interval. – Asaf Feb 17 '14 at 21:12
  • 1
    @xTCx You should store the last time the screen is updated, and use the current time minus the last update time to get a delta time to be use as the basis of your computation. Additionally, your current logic calculates position with a precision of 1 pixel, you should provide sub-pixel precision (can achieved by shift all values left by 10 bits when doing calculation). This way objects drawn will not for example, move 1 extra pixel every other refresh. More info: stackoverflow.com/questions/7923349/slick2d-game-speed-changing – Kai Mar 9 '14 at 11:35
  • Avoid any object allocation and calculations inside onDraw. On draw should only draw. Anything that you do inside onDraw slow down drawing. Precache your Paint objects and sizes. – Gaskoin Mar 13 '14 at 9:11

First of all, Canvas can perform poorly so don't expect too much. You might want to try the lunarlander example from the SDK and see what performance you get on your hardware.

Try lowering you max fps down to something like 30, the goal is to be smooth not fast.

 private final static int    MAX_FPS = 30;   // desired fps

Also get rid of the sleep calls, rendering to the canvas will probably sleep enough. Try something more like:

        synchronized (mSurfaceHolder) {
            beginTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            framesSkipped = 0;

            timeDiff = System.currentTimeMillis() - beginTime;

            sleepTime = (int) (FRAME_PERIOD - timeDiff);

            if(sleepTime <= 0) {

                this.mMainGameBoard.update();

                this.mMainGameBoard.render(mCanvas);

            }
        }

If you want to you can do your this.mMainGameBoard.update() more often than your render.

Edit: Also since you say things get slow when the obstacles appear. Try drawing them to an offscreen Canvas / Bitmap. I've heard that some of the drawSHAPE methods are CPU optimized and you'll get better performance drawing them to an offline canvas/bitmap because those are not hardware/gpu accelerated.

Edit2: What does Canvas.isHardwareAccelerated() return for you?

One of the most common causes of slow-down and stuttering in a game is the graphics pipeline. Game logic is a lot faster to process than it is to draw (in general) so you want to make sure that you draw everything in the most efficient way possible. Below you can find some tips on how to achieve this.

some suggetion to make it better

https://www.yoyogames.com/tech_blog/30

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